Firework anxiety in dogs – Now is the best time to fix it 
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
2h ago
Nearly half of pet owners say that their dog has fireworks anxiety. Research has shown that 80% of owners report significant changes in their pet’s behaviour during fireworks. Now is the perfect time to ensure next year is easier for your dog. It is natural for dogs to be afraid of loud noises and flashing lights. In the natural environment they would warn of danger. Your dogs’ senses are highly developed. Noise will appear far louder to them than us, lights will appear brighter and more defined. Often fireworks displays have multiple flashes and bags in succession or even at the same time. Th ..read more
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Taking Care of your Pet in the Heat 
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
2h ago
Dogs and cats are at risk of heat stroke in the summer months. Cats do like to sunbathe but tend to know when they have had enough heat and will move to a more shaded spot. Dogs are sometimes not quite so smart and may need to be moved from the sun to prevent overheating.  Remember dogs do not sweat like humans, their primary cooling method is panting. When the temperature outside gets close to matching the dog’s body temperature, panting becomes ineffective, and the dog is at risk of heat stroke.   Although all animals can overheat, pets that are obese or are brachycephalic (fl ..read more
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Veterinary Nurse awareness month  
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
2w ago
May is Veterinary Nurse awareness month. This annual event aims to raise awareness of the role of the Registered Veterinary Nurse (RVN).   RVN’s are highly skilled veterinary professionals. Registered Veterinary Nurses have completed extensive training and examinations to achieve their qualifications. Training is always completed through colleges or universities. These must offer qualifications approved by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS). The RCVS regularly inspects education programmes to maintain high standards. A list of RCVS approved qualifications in veterinary n ..read more
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The laws around cat microchipping
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
3w ago
A new law is being introduced in England requiring domestic cats to be microchipped. From 10th June 2024 the law will come into place. All cats must be microchipped by the time they are 20 weeks old. If you do not comply and your cat is found to not have one you have 21 days to have one implanted or you will face a fine of up to £500.  Indoor cats must also be microchipped in case they escape the house. The new law will not be compulsory for feral cats or cats with little human interaction.  This law is not being introduced in Wales, Scotland or Northern Ireland at the current t ..read more
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World Veterinary Day – Celebrating veterinary healthcare teams
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
3w ago
At PetGP, we are incredibly lucky to have an excellent veterinary team comprised of highly skilled, qualified vets and nurses with many years of post-qualification experience.   Veterinary teams are made up of essential health workers not only there to help your pets but also an integral part of human health. The World Health Organisation (WHO) promote a “one health” system that advocates for a unifying approach. This aims to sustainably balance and optimise the health of people, animals, and ecosystems. The health of humans, domestic and wild animals, plants, and the wider environme ..read more
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Preparing your cat for a cattery
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
1M ago
 Leaving a beloved pet in a kennel or cattery for the first time, whether it’s for a day or a week, can be nerve-wracking. The key to ensuring their comfort and well-being during their stay comes down to proper preparation. Read on to learn more about how to help your cat put their best paw forwards.   Start preparing early: Consider starting training in the weeks before your stay. Gradually increase their exposure to their carrier/crate by leaving it open in the house with comfortable bedding and treats inside. This helps your cat associate the carrier with positive experiences ..read more
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Surgical vs Chemical, Dog Castration
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
3M ago
Making decisions that may affect your dog’s health long term can be difficult. We have made this guide to help when making those decisions about castrating your dog by either surgery, or an implant.   Surgical castration  Surgical castration is the removal of both testes under a general anaesthetic. This is normally done either at around 6 months of age or after growth plate closure. This is when your dog stops growing. Larger dogs take a longer time to finish growing, up to 18 months. Smaller dogs may have finished growing by 12 months of age. Castration before this point can l ..read more
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Ten signs that your cat loves you. 
Pet GP Blog
by Admin
3M ago
Although cats get a bad reputation as being a bit cold and aloof, they do love us is in their own special way. Many cat owners, lovers and experts will tell you this. Its important to know how to spot that your cat loves you. We’ve listed ten different ways that a cat may subtly be telling you that they love you. By recognising these signs it will help you build a bond with your pet. It may also help you realise the more subtle signs of when they may be unhappy and unwell as well.    Cat love A strong bond can increase feelings of security and reduce stress. This is beneficial to both hea ..read more
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Spring plant hazards
Pet GP Blog
by Louise Horton
3M ago
As the weather gets warmer we start to spend more time in the garden. Did you realise there are several poisonous spring plant hazards for our pets?  Our pets are curious creatures and will often sniff, chew and ingest plants which could be extremely dangerous to them.  Sometimes it’s just the flowers or pollen which are poisonous and sometimes it can be the bulbs or leaves.     Lilies These are extremely toxic to cats; all parts of the plant are poisonous and can lead to serious kidney problems.  Even the water from a vase of lilies can contain toxins. This ..read more
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Storage mites 
Pet GP Blog
by Admin
3M ago
Storage mites are likely something you have never even heard of. We all live with them in our daily lives and homes. By domesticating our pets and bringing them indoors we have exposed them to these tiny creatures. Like humans, pets can develop allergies to anything. A storage mite allergy can be uncomfortable and frustrating to deal with. It’s useful to be aware of what these mites are and how you can limit exposure.  Storage mites are microscopic insects. They are found in dry stores such as hay, grain, flour, dry pet food and even cheese. These mites thrive in places where dry foods ar ..read more
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