23 | Confused about urinary tumours? You need to read this
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
2d ago
Urinary tract tumours are an important cause of lower urinary tract signs in older patients.   These patients benefit from extensive nursing care—not just at the time of diagnosis but for the rest of their lives, too, to give them the best possible quality of life for as long as possible.  Today, I’m joined by Inge Breathach DipVN, DipAVN(Small Animal), PGCertAVN(Oncology) RVN. Inge has a wealth of oncology experience, currently works as the oncology nurse at Bristol Veterinary Specialists, and will shortly sit her VTS(Oncology) exam. Together, we’ll look at what these tumours are, t ..read more
Visit website
22 | The top 4 things you need to know about prostatic disease as a vet nurse
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
2d ago
Prostatic disease is a common cause of stranguria, haematuria and even recurrent UTIs, especially in older male dogs and entire males.   And the truth is, we can use many nursing skills to diagnose and treat prostatic disease.  Today, we’ll take a look at the four types of prostatic disease we see, the signs they cause, and the diagnostics, treatment, and nursing considerations for these patients. But first, it’s time for a little anatomy refresher… The prostate is a bilobed organ that completely encircles the proximal urethra and the neck of the urinary bladder in male dogs. The pr ..read more
Visit website
22 | The top 4 things you need to know about prostatic disease as a vet nurse
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1w ago
Prostatic disease is a common cause of stranguria, haematuria and even recurrent UTIs, especially in older male dogs and entire males.   And the truth is, we can use many nursing skills to diagnose and treat prostatic disease.  Today, we’ll take a look at the four types of prostatic disease we see, the signs they cause, and the diagnostics, treatment, and nursing considerations for these patients. But first, it’s time for a little anatomy refresher… The prostate is a bilobed organ that completely encircles the proximal urethra and the neck of the urinary bladder in male dogs. The pr ..read more
Visit website
21 | How to plan and deliver amazing care to your urolith patients
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
2w ago
Urinary stones are a common cause of lower urinary tract disease in cats and dogs.   But before we can start treating them, we need to look at what uroliths we commonly see and what causes them to occur.  Each type will require different treatment and, therefore, different nursing care… which is exactly what we’re discussing in this episode of the Medical Nursing Podcast. So what IS a urolith? Put simply, a urolith is a stone. Urolithiasis is the generalised term used to describe a stone anywhere in the urinary tract; then you’ve got nephroliths, ureteroliths, urocystoliths and uret ..read more
Visit website
20 | How to manage those stressed-out bladder cats without getting stressed yourself!
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
3w ago
What if your blocked cat doesn’t have a “real” reason for being blocked?!   If they’ve not got a stone, stricture, plug or mass… chances are they’ve got feline idiopathic cystitis, aka FIC. These cats account for more and more of the obstructions we see - with FIC now being the most common feline lower urinary tract disorder. FIC cats can be really tough to manage as they’re often incredibly stressed, painful, and unhappy in the hospital - and often, we then discharge them to a home environment full of chronic stressors. Today, we’ll discuss what causes FIC, the signs we see in these pati ..read more
Visit website
How to push past the fear and succeed as a medicine nurse with Allana
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1M ago
We talk a lot here about diversifying your career, experiencing new clinics, and using more skills. And whilst I’m pretty good at sharing examples of how I’ve done this in my career in the hope that this helps people do the same, we all know that veterinary nursing (and veterinary technology) look different worldwide. Today, I’m delighted to share Allana’s story with you. Allana is a member of the Medical Nursing Academy and works as an Internal Medicine nurse in a specialty clinic in Australia. She shares her journey so far, from completing her veterinary nursing certification to studying onl ..read more
Visit website
19 | How to give great care to your blocked bladder cats as a vet nurse
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1M ago
We’ve all been in the position where we’ve been busy clearing up after a busy ops day… when the vet rushes through that painful, stressed, straining cat with a bladder like an overinflated balloon.   And whilst this is a very treatable condition, there is a LOT of nursing care that these patients benefit from - not just when they’re obstructed, but to help prevent future obstructions, too. In this episode, we’ll discuss what causes urethral obstruction, how these patients present, and how we can provide them with the best possible care. What is a urethral obstruction? As the name suggest ..read more
Visit website
18 | How to successfully care for cats with ureteral obstructions
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1M ago
I’ll let you in on a secret - I had absolutely no idea that ureteral obstructions were a thing until I went into referral practice.   I’d never seen one - but that quickly changed when my own cat, Nigel, got an obstruction himself. The truth is, though, that ureteral obstructions are being diagnosed more and more often now than ever, particularly in cats - and there is a LOT we can do as nurses and technicians to support these patients.  They usually present markedly painful and with post-renal AKI, which can be life-threatening if bilateral obstructions are present and often require ..read more
Visit website
17 | How to confidently treat and nurse dogs with leptospirosis
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1M ago
This week, we’re chatting about a disease we’re seeing more and more often in practice and one that has significant risks to both us and our clients: leptospirosis.   Leptospirosis is an increasingly common, potentially fatal zoonotic disease found throughout the world. These patients often benefit from advanced treatment and nursing care, especially if they have acute kidney injury as a result of their infection. In today’s episode, we’ll examine leptospirosis, how it affects our patients, and how we can provide the best possible care to them. What is leptospirosis, and how does infecti ..read more
Visit website
16 | How to care for patients with ethylene glycol toxicity as a vet nurse
Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog
by Laura Jones
1M ago
I’m sure when I say ‘antifreeze poisoning’ you’ll have a case you’ve seen that comes to mind.   They’re usually collapsed cats who present with severe renal failure, and they require a ton of nursing care. Though they do have a poor prognosis, there are a lot of nursing skills we can use to support these patients - and to do that, we first need to look at what happens when our patients ingest ethylene glycol. What is ethylene glycol? Ethylene glycol is a highly nephrotoxic compound found most commonly in vehicle radiator antifreeze, though it is also found in other solvents, household pr ..read more
Visit website

Follow Veterinary Internal Medicine Nursing Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR