Penzance: end of the line
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
We have reached the final registration district (RD) in this tour of Cornwall’s nineteenth century districts and their migration patterns. Penzance was Cornwall’s most westerly RD but had a somewhat more diverse economic structure in the 1800s than its immediate neighbours. Although there were miners, particularly along the coast between St Just and St Ives ..read more
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Camborne-Redruth: Cornwall’s Central Emigration District
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
The Redruth RD of the nineteenth century included within its bounds the central mining district. Named such because of its geographical centrality in the emerging eighteenth century industrial region of west Cornwall, the central mining district was also the most prolific producer of tin and copper ore from the early 1700s onwards. Fittingly, after the ..read more
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Helston: quaint old Cornish town?
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
In the centuries before the 1600s Helston was one of the two most important market towns west of Truro, the other being Penryn. Falmouth and Penzance were not on the map until the 1500s while Camborne and Redruth were just small churchtowns indistinguishable from the scores of others scattered over the inhospitable and lightly populated ..read more
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Falmouth: port and people
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
Falmouth was, and is, different, often cited as the atypical Cornish town. More than any other place in Cornwall, Falmouth’s horizons seem to look outwards rather than inwards. It emerged late, a new town of the seventeenth century nestling on the sheltered western side of the Fal estuary and quickly elbowing aside its older medieval ..read more
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Truro: Cornwall’s ‘county’ town
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
Truro is now Cornwall’s premier town, leading the way in the transformation of Cornwall into a ‘home county’ by the sea. Its residents might prefer to call it a city though, courtesy of the cathedral built there in the 1880s after an Anglican diocese was restored to Cornwall. A population of just under 19,000 in ..read more
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St Austell: the clay effect
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
In the early 1800s St Austell differed little from the other small market towns typical of east Cornwall. Its fortunes were however about to be transformed by the expansion of copper mines to its east and then clay works in the hills to the north. Nonetheless, the population of the urban district of St Austell ..read more
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St Columb: life before Newquay
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
Children born in the St Columb Registration District (RD) around 1850 grew up at a time when Newquay was a small fishing and trading village. Newquay’s population was still under 3,000 as late as 1901. It then grew rapidly in the first half of the twentieth century to overshadow the market town of St Columb ..read more
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Bodmin: from stay at homes to population boom
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
In 1961, the population of the market town of Bodmin was just over 6,000. The previous half-century had only seen a small increase of less than 1,000 on its 1901 population of 5,300. Nonetheless, it was larger than its east Cornish rivals at Launceston and Liskeard. But this was not enough. Local politicians were seduced ..read more
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Liskeard: Just passing through?
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
3M ago
Let’s return to the Cornish Victorian Lives database. Liskeard Registration District (RD) was large in terms of area and, relative to the other eastern RDs, population. Like the Calstock/Callington sub-district that was reviewed in the previous post and unlike the RDs to its north and east, it had been more than touched by mining operations ..read more
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Speculations on the swift: celebrating Charles Morton
Cornish Studies Resources
by bwdeacon
4M ago
At this time of the year, bird-watchers will begin to feel a keen sense of anticipation as they await the first sign of migrant birds returning to our skies. Particularly fascinating are the swifts, those black birds with sickle-shaped wings who swoop and swerve above our heads, their distinctive cries alerting us to their presence ..read more
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