#JournalClub with Alysia: How exosomes can promote cancer spread?
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
3d ago
Hi, it’s Alysia, here to give you some insight on exosomes’ impact on tumor metastatic niche formation! I found an interesting paper related to my work that I want to share with you: Tumour-derived exosomes drive immunosuppressive macrophages in a pre-metastatic niche through glycolytic dominant metabolic reprogramming. Exosomes have been a groundbreaking field of research ..read more
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#JournalClub with Ronja: What can we learn from other cancers?
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
3w ago
In this row of journal club blog posts, I’ve decided to look at this study: A Tumor Microenvironment Model of Pancreatic Cancer to Elucidate Responses toward Immunotherapy. In this study, researchers developed an advanced model to simulate the environment surrounding pancreatic cancer cells. Using a specialized hydrogel matrix, they encapsulated pancreatic cancer cells, patient-derived stromal ..read more
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What Can VHI Women’s Mini Marathon Do For You?
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
1M ago
I have never been a runner. In my head, the word ‘marathon’ was linked to professional athletes and the Olympics or Athletics competitions. I could not imagine anyone doing a race as long as one gets guts. However, once I found the courage and motivation to explore my body’s limits. It was probably our team ..read more
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Class 2024: Congratulations to Ciara, Ellen and Rabia!
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
1M ago
Massive congratulations on the official moulding of PhD and MSc by Research to our promising young scientists: Rabia Saleem, Dr Ciara Gallagher and Dr Ellen King! Great accomplishments! Three different journeys, with two through the COVID-19 pandemic. The full range of ups and downs. Who said that the PhD is a straight line? It has ..read more
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Walking the Wicklow Way, 87/129 km
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
2M ago
Little did I know about hikers when I moved to Ireland in 2004. Who they are and how they get around. My knowledge was limited to Rosalind Franklin’s love of hiking. I could not even imagine that one day I’d try their shoes. However, things have changed since then! Spiced by the COVID-19 pandemic and ..read more
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How things work in science: Gene editing technology
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
3M ago
Few advancements in biomedical sciences hold as much promise for revolutionising cancer research as CRISPR-Cas9. This ground-breaking gene-editing tool has sparked a wave of innovation, offering precision and efficiency in manipulating the human genome in the fight against cancer. Now, what is it? CRISPR is basically an acronym for a very long name Clustered Regularly ..read more
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Congratulations to a new Dr in the house: Dr Ellen King
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
3M ago
Huge congrats to a newly minted Dr Ellen King!  She passed her PhD viva on April 9. This is a testimony to your dedication, strong will and hard work. May this PhD be the beginning of many more successful endeavours, Ellen! We thank examiners Prof Sally-Ann Cryan (RCSI) and Prof Joanne Lysaght (TCD) for the time and expertise ..read more
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How things work in science: targeting cell components.
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
4M ago
How do researchers study cells? How do we get the nitty gritty? We use many methods to tag and chase various cell components. One of my favourites is fluorescent microscopy. It allows the use of nearly all spectrum of colours from blue to purple in one go. However, we prefer to narrow it down to ..read more
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How things work in science: Scaffolding
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
4M ago
At the Cancer Bioengineering Group, we use different types of scaffolds to mimic the 3D structure of tumours outside the body. We use these scaffolds to test new therapeutics and understand the tumour microenvironment. But I bet you didn’t think we had this in common with spiders? Spiders make their webs by producing silk from ..read more
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How things work in Science: Tìr na nÒg
Blog About Neuroblastoma Biology
by Neuroblast
4M ago
In humans, NANOG, SOX2, and OCT4 are transcription factors that maintain the undifferentiated state of embryonic stem cells (ESCs). NANOG was first discovered in 2003 by Chambers et al. and Mitsui et al. as a transcription factor in ESCs responsible for cellular self-renewal. More importantly, it enables continuous self-renewal of cancer stem cells, leading to ..read more
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