Smoke gets in your eyes
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
4d ago
Except on his birthday, Buddy did not smoke up the place. One reason most people are doing little to fight climate change is that its effects are so surreptitious. We can’t see the sea level rising. We don’t feel the heat in our air-conditioned world. For most of us, drought and storms and flooding are somewhere else. If we’re noticing more effects, it’s mostly through our wallets, directing our attention to other symptoms like homeowners’ insurance, food prices, water costs. But there is one immediate effect of climate change that’s in the face of millions of Americans, and that’s smoke! Co ..read more
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Climate Corps
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
1w ago
In complex projects Buddy always wanted to ‘facilitate collaboration.’ Maybe soon we’ll be seeing gangs of 18-25-year-olds in our neighborhood wearing reflective vests and carrying shovels or chainsaws. Our hometowns are taking lots of measures to protect residents against climate damages and costs. ClimateDog has covered a dozen or more of them, from movable flood barriers to the most recent, preventing sewer overflows. We’ve been looking at the WHAT of these adaptation actions, but I wonder also about the WHO. Who will actually build these labor-intensive protections across the country? Th ..read more
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Grid expansion made easy
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
2w ago
Buddy knew a lot about high-tension wires. Promising developments can help people with climate anxieties reframe their thinking, as Stella did in last week’s Climate Dog. Some of these inventions reduce carbon emissions; some reduce climate costs and damages. New inventions are particularly needed in power distribution. Producing power is one thing, but transporting it from source to use is another. Much of our power today comes from huge amounts of liquid, gas, and coal which are carried by pipeline, train, and truck. But as we gradually switch from those fossil fuels to wind, solar, hydro ..read more
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Telling ourselves
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
3w ago
Always hopeful. Negative thought patterns, especially if kept under wraps, foster negative emotions and behaviors. Here’s an example. What Stella thinks “I’m scared. It took my parents a long time to notice it. “I never had anxiety or depression in grade school, but last summer at the beach, looking at the waves, I started to get really anxious about climate change. Except for school assignments, I couldn’t stand reading the news, especially anything environmental. I started wondering if everything coming my way - sea level rise, flooding, drought, species extinction, the other predictions ..read more
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Underground climate costs
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
1M ago
How safe is this water? Lots of American hometowns have sewer pipes that drain stormwater from their streets and parking lots and deposit it in a stream, river or bay. And about 75 percent of Americans have municipal wastewater treatment facilities piping untreated sewage from our sinks and toilets. In order to dig once, not twice, many stormwater and wastewater pipes were laid together. Of course they were originally designed to keep the sewage and stormwater apart. But climate change has made many of these designs obsolete. Extreme single-day precipitation events, with growing frequency an ..read more
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The appalling silence
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
1M ago
Buddy was usually silent, but often had a sense of urgency. Martin Luther King once told us We shall have to repent in this generation, not so much for the evil deeds of the wicked people, but for the appalling silence of the good people. He was speaking in 1967 about enacting protections for blacks in America. But those words characterize today’s efforts to reduce greenhouse emissions and build local protections against climate change. Most of us are silent. And at the wrong moment! Now is the time On November 5th, America’s efforts to fight the growth of climate change and its local dama ..read more
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Personal climate resilience
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
1M ago
Buddy had few anxieties. A strong support group helped! More and more towns are taking local measures to control flooding, cool their residents, prevent drought, and adapt to other environmental dangers and costs. They’re creating physical resilience, and ClimateDog has described a dozen such protections in recent months. But more and more we’re finding that, beyond the dangers growing in our neighborhood, other risks are growing in our minds. Global warming is threatening the thinking, emotions, and happiness of millions. Symptoms of stress, anxiety, and grief are growing as we think about ..read more
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A new way to see our climate risks
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
1M ago
Please! Can we move to a warmer climate! In my 2016 book Climate-Proof Your Personal Finances I asked Do you know a real estate agent personally?You might ask if she or he sees any signs of reduced demand in neighborhoods with some sort of water or drought risk - flooding, dropping well water, oceanfront. Although most agents don’t acknowledge this trend yet, I have talked to several who admit it’s already happening. Climate oblivion has been the natural condition among Realtors. After all, their inventory of properties for sale is likely to be devalued if local climate risks are considere ..read more
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Harvesting water
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
2M ago
In 2012 Buddy helped organize this Energy Independence Day Expo. We had 70 local climate-related exhibitors. NOAA tells us this February 22% of the lower 48 states were experiencing drought. This is not just the usual suspects like Arizona and California. Low snowpack, decreasing soil moisture, and dry, warm weather have led to growing drought in parts of Wisconsin, Michigan and other normally wet states. With fewer hometowns across the country safe from occasional drought these days, it’s in their best interests for many to take steps to protect residents from water shortages. One of these ..read more
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Wildfire prevention
ClimateDog
by David Stookey
2M ago
Buddy only encountered fire on birthdays. Many of us live in neighborhoods designed to retain some natural surroundings. These patches of trees, grasslands, and scrub can beautify the area and keep us feeling closer to nature, but global warming is quickly turning many of them into hazards. The US Fire Administration tells us that More than 60,000 communities lie in what is called the wildland-urban interface (WUI), and their risks of wildfire are growing.. Between 2002 and 2016, an average of over 3,000 structures per year were lost to WUI fires in the United States. Many more were ..read more
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