The Japanese Bolt-Action Arisaka Type 99 Rifle Saw Extensive Use In the Pacific Theater
War History Online » World War II
by June Steele
14h ago
The Arisaka Type 99 rifle was a significant evolution in the realm of military armaments. Born out of necessity in the 1930s, its development reflected a desire to equip the Imperial Japanese Army (IJA) with an advanced, reliable weapon; its introduction served to underscore Japan’s commitment to achieving technological parity with other military powers of the time. A need for a more powerful bolt-action rifle Japanese troops stationed in China, equipped with Type 38 rifles, 1937. (Photo Credit: Pictures from History / Universal Images Group / Getty Images) The Arisaka Type 99 rifle came abou ..read more
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Germany Hoped to Weaponize the Occult to Win the Second World War
War History Online » World War II
by Rosemary Giles
14h ago
Germany thought up several strategies to increase its chances of winning World War II, including the breeding of potato bugs to decimate enemy crops and agricultural resources. Arguably the most bizarre tactic entertained during the conflict was the occult. Astonishingly – or, perhaps, predictably, given the prevalent misconceptions held by high-ranking officials – several officers were stark believers in this unconventional approach. Werewolves and vampires Werewolf-like creature that was captured in a German forest in the 1500s. (Photo Credit: Ann Ronan Pictures / Print Collector / Getty Im ..read more
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The Battle of France Saw a European Power Fall in Just Six Weeks
War History Online » World War II
by Clare Fitzgerald
14h ago
One campaign changed the direction of the Second World War: the Battle of France. The period leading up to the engagement was known as the “Phoney War” and it had lulled the Allies into a false sense of security. Taking advantage of this, Germany developed a strategy based on a concept known as Blitzkrieg – or “lightning war.” By circumventing the heavily-fortified Maginot Line, the military aimed to catch the Allies off-guard. All this preparation paid off, with Germany gaining control of not just France, but also the Low Countries by the end of June 1940. Germany’s Blitzkrieg strategy ..read more
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Shiro Ishii and the Dark Legacy of Japan’s Unit 731
War History Online » World War II
by Elisabeth Edwards
3d ago
Japanese physician Shiro Ishii presided over a series of abhorrent medical experiments that stand as some of the most egregious atrocities in modern history. Ranging from the development and testing of biological warfare agents to conducting live dissections on victims, the actions of Unit 731 constituted unspeakable crimes against humanity, targeting men, women and children in ways that defy comprehension, even by contemporary standards. Shiro Ishii’s early life Shiro Ishii upon graduating from Kyoto Imperial University, 1920. (Photo Credit: Aising / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain) Shiro ..read more
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The Dear John Letter Was a Symbol of Heartbreak Amid the Terrors of War
War History Online » World War II
by June Steele
3d ago
When its comes to wartime communications, few carry the weight of the infamous Dear John letter. Originating during World War II, these correspondences have become a symbol of love lost and personal sacrifice during times of conflict, showing that combat can sometimes have a negative impact on peoples’ relationships. World War II origins Photo Credit: Archive Photos / Hulton Archive / Getty Images The term “Dear John” letter is believed to have originated during the Second World War, with the first reported instance being noted in The New York Times in October 1943. Milton Bracker, a war corr ..read more
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Ending the Deadliest Conflict in Human History: Why Did Japan Surrender in World War II?
War History Online » World War II
by June Steele
5d ago
The Japanese surrender in World War II brought to a close one of the darkest and deadliest chapters in human history. While the Germans waved the white flag in May 1945, it took the Empire of Japan several more months to admit they’d been defeated. Most believe the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki were the only reason the country surrendered, but, in reality, there were several factors at play. Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki Ruins of Hiroshima following the atomic bombing, 1945. (Photo Credit: Universal History Archive / Universal Images Group / Getty Images) Two key event ..read more
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Upcoming ‘Armour & Embarkation’ Event to Mark 80th Anniversary of D-Day Landings
War History Online » World War II
by Geoff Moore
1w ago
A recreation of the movements of the American and British forces is scheduled to take place in the county of Dorset in Southern England to mark the contributions of all forces, marking this the 80th anniversary of D-Day build-up. Unfortunately, organizers have confirmed this will likely be the last year of the event, due to high costs. Photo Credit: Geoff Moore / The Travel Trunk This year’s Armour & Embarkation event, a huge historic military vehicle road run and tour of the county, will take place on Saturday, June 22, 2024. Recreating the build-up to the D-Day landings, a convoy of aro ..read more
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Mauthausen Was One of the Most Notorious Concentration Camps Operated By the German Regime
War History Online » World War II
by Clare Fitzgerald
1w ago
Nestled in the picturesque landscape of Austria, the remnants of Mauthausen concentration camp are a somber testament to one of the darkest chapters of the Second World War. Established by 1938, the camp became a symbol of terror and human suffering, witnessing the deaths of tens of thousands of prisoners before being liberated by the Allies in 1945. More than 80 years later, Mauthausen’s legacy, steeped in the pain and the perseverance of those imprisoned there, continues to resonate today. Establishment of Mauthausen concentration camp Construction of Mauthausen concentration camp, 1938. (P ..read more
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Memorial Erected In Honor of American Troops Who Died In D-Day Rehearsal Exercise
War History Online » World War II
by Clare Fitzgerald
1w ago
Nearly 80 years after the disastrous rehearsal for the D-Day landings, a memorial has been erected in honor of the 110 American servicemen who perished during what was supposed to be a practice amphibious landing. The unveiling of the monument was a result of four years of research by one man, who was determined to keep the fallen soldiers’ legacies in the public consciousness. American troops during rehearsals for the D-Day landings, 1944. (Photo Credit: U.S. Signal Corps / Library of Congress’ Prints and Photographs Division / Wikimedia Commons / Public Domain) The size of the D-Day landing ..read more
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‘Female Schindler’ Diana Budisavljević Saved 7,700 Children During World War II
War History Online » World War II
by Bliss Donahue-Power
3w ago
Throughout the Second World War, several individuals risked their lives to save those being persecuted by the German regime. The most notable names are Oskar Schindler and Sir Nicholas Winston, but there’s one person who deserves more recognition: Diana Budisavljević. Horrified at how young children were being treated at German-run labor camps, she dedicated her time to rescuing them from their less-than-humane living conditions. Axis invasion of Yugoslavia German soldiers arriving in Zagreb during the Axis invasion of Yugoslavia, 1941. (Photo Credit: Roger Viollet / Getty Images) Diana Budis ..read more
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