Vietnamese adopted brother and sister find each other through DNA
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by lynellelong
16h ago
Mikati is a fellow Vietnamese adoptee raised in Belgium, who joined the ICAV network some years ago, wanting to connect to those who understood the complexities of this lifelong journey. I’m honoured to be a part of her life and she told me the amazing news recently of finding and reuniting with her biological brother Georges who was also adopted, but to France. Neither knew of the other until their DNA matches showed up. Together, Mikati and Georges have shared with me their thoughts about finding each other and searching now for their Vietnamese family. Since sharing this and having their ne ..read more
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How to Truly Save and Help a Child
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
16h ago
by Jessica Davis, USA adoptive mother to Uganda daughter returned to biological family, founder of Kugatta. Around Christmas and the new year, I get to see my formerly adopted daughter and her family and each time, I am reminded of everything that was almost lost. I see them together, happy and thriving and I’m reminded just how powerful investing into the lives of others can be. As someone who has participated in and witnessed the negative impacts of intercountry adoption as well as running a nonprofit that helps families that have been separated from their loved one via this practice, I can ..read more
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Being Adopted
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
3w ago
by Marcella Moslow born in Colombia and adopted to the USA; trauma therapist The heavy realities that adoptees must navigate are staggering and complex. The voids we carry with us are enormous and no matter the amount of love we receive, it often feels like it is not enough. The connection and attunement we seek, the culture that we have a right to, the attachment we were wired for is stripped from us, leaving deep wounds behind. This is devastating to an individual’s system and carries into future generations. We grapple with the reality that not only did we have something happen to us, but w ..read more
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Adopted for 32 years and now FREE!
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by lynellelong
1M ago
by Lynelle Long, Vietnamese ex-adoptee raised in Australia, Founder of ICAV I can officially now say, “I WAS adopted” as in, it is of the past. Now, my identity changes once again and I am no longer legally plenary adopted. I am my own person having made a clear and cognitive adult age decision that I want to be legally free of the people who looked after me since 5 months old. Mostly, I wanted to be legally recognised as my biological mother’s child and for the truth to be on my birth certificate and flowing into all my identity documents for the future. This also impacts my children and the ..read more
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Navigating Disability and Rare Medical Conditions as an Intercountry Adoptee
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by lynellelong
1M ago
Webinar, Perspective Paper and Resources On 23 November, ICAV ran a webinar with 6 incredible panelists sharing lived experience as intercountry adoptees with disability and rare medical conditions. It’s taken some time to edit this webinar and I hope you will take the time to have a listen. Adoptees with disability and medical conditions are often invisible amongst the intercountry adoptee community and our goal was to elevate them and help to raise awareness of the extra complexities they experience. Webinar Video Timecode For those who are time poor, I have provided a time code so you can ..read more
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Restoring my Korean Citizenship
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
2M ago
by Stephanie Don-Hee Kim, adopted from Sth Korea to the Netherlands. Application for restoring of Korean Citizenship Next to legally restoring my birth family name, I have spent quite some energy in completing my application for restoring my Korean Citizenship. The Korean Government allows dual citizenship since 2011, mainly for adoptees. It was mandatory to submit the application on site in Korea at the Immigration Office in Seoul. It is thought that this was quite an obstacle for many adoptees, since travelling to Korea is not cheap nor very easy to organise. Since 2021, the procedure has ch ..read more
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Grief in Adoption
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
2M ago
by Cosette Eisenhauer adopted from China to the USA, Co-Founder of Navigating Adoption Grief is a weird concept. I expect myself to grieve people that I know, family and friends that have passed. Those times it makes sense to grieve the loss of a loved one. I know them and I’ve loved them. I am able to grieve a person that I’ve met, a person who impacted my life for one reason or another. People also grieve when there are tragic events, a lot of times this come with knowing their names and faces. Grieving my biological parents and the life I might have had in China is a weird type of grief ..read more
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Confirmation that we are born as adoptees
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
2M ago
by Hollee McGinnis born in South Korea, adopted to the USA, Founder of Also Known As (AKA), Assistant Professor of Social Work at Virginia Commonwealth University Like many adoptees, the only pictures I had of my birth growing up were the ones of me when I entered the orphanage around the age of two that convinced my parents I was to be their daughter and photos of my arrival to the U.S. when I was three. And so, I felt as a child I had fallen out of the sky on a Boeing 747, walking, talking, and potty-trained. Being born was foreign. I had no evidence of it happening to me, no one to be my m ..read more
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An Adoptee’s Thoughts on Haaland vs Brackeen
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by Guest Blogger
3M ago
by Patrick Armstrong adopted from South Korea to the USA, Adoptee Speaker, Podcaster, and Community Facilitator, Co-Host of the Janchi Show, Co-Founder of Asian Adoptees of Indiana Today the Supreme Court will hear the case of Haaland v. Brackeen. What’s at stake? The Indian Child Welfare Act (ICWA) and potentially, other federal protections for Indigenous tribes. Per the New York Times: “The law was drafted to respond to more than a century of Native children’s being forcibly removed from tribal homes by social workers, sent to government and missionary boarding schools and then pl ..read more
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One Adoptee’s Thoughts on the UN Joint Statement on Illegal Intercountry Adoptions
InterCountry Adoptee Voices
by lynellelong
3M ago
Resilience by CLAIR On 29 September 2022, the United Nations (UN) published a press release titled: Illegal intercountry adoptions must be prevented and eliminated: UN experts which provides a Joint Statement from the UN Committees. While the majority around the world could not have pre-empted this statement, it was not news to me because our coalition Voices Against Illegal Adoption (VAIA) had been talking with the UN to ensure our input was included. I know other experts in illegal intercountry adoption around the world gave input too. The UN Joint Statement created for me a day of mixed fee ..read more
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