Autism Acceptance Month
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
6d ago
A Reflection on 25 Years of Progress As we embark on Autism Acceptance Month, it’s essential to explore the journey of understanding and supporting autistic individuals. Having spent 25 years working with autistic children, I’ve witnessed firsthand the evolution of attitudes, approaches, and understanding surrounding autism. In this blog post, I’ll delve into the transformative shifts that I’ve made with my vocabulary, thoughts and teaching approaches. By looking back at these areas I hope to help promote a better understanding of autism and encourage acceptance and support for autistic child ..read more
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Toilet Training Autistic Children
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
3w ago
If you joined us for Part 1 and 2 of this series, you are READY for these tips and tricks. If you haven’t read them, go and do that now and come back to this one. Potty Training With Compassion-Part 1 Potty Training With Compassion-Part 2 We’ve talked about WHY toilet training can be more difficult for autistic children. Interoception differences and delay, as well as language delays can make it harder to get started with toilet training. Despite that, there are skills you can work on, no matter where your child or student is on this potty journey. In the last two blog posts we ..read more
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Autism: Potty Train Your Child
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
3w ago
Toilet training marks a significant developmental milestone for children, yet it presents unique challenges, particularly for those on the autism spectrum. In our previous blog, Potty Train With Compassion-Part 1, we delved into the hurdles posed by interoception and language delays. If you haven’t had the chance to read it, I highly recommend doing so before proceeding with this post. When embarking on toilet training with autistic children, employing the right strategies and support is crucial for success. We’ll dive deeper into identifying the initial skill to focus on and explore specific ..read more
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Potty Train With Compassion – Part 1
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
1M ago
One of the biggest skills parents of my students want to work on is potty training, and rightly so. This skill is huge when it comes to independence! But, many times, ditching those diapers and pull-ups takes a lot more time than with neurotypical children. Why is that? This is the first of three blog posts about potty training autistic children. We will delve into the unique challenges faced by parents and caregivers while providing practical strategies to identify where you can get started. I want to help you make toilet training a positive and empowering journey for all. Why Does ..read more
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Play-Based Learning for Preschool Autistic Children
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
1M ago
We’ve been hearing a lot more about play-based learning in the last few years. But, how does that work for our young autistic children who require structure in the classroom? We are going to explore combining structure and predictable routines with play-based learning for young autistic children! What is Play-Based Learning? Play based learning is a method of education that uses play as the primary means for children to learn and develop skills. It allows children to explore, experiment, and engage in activities that are enjoyable and meaningful to them, while also promoting their cognit ..read more
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Spring Break Social Story
Autism Little Learners Blog
by autismlittlelearners
1M ago
This spring break social story will help prepare your student or child for spring break. This story is short and simple. If you would like a free starter visual schedule to use during spring break, sign up for the free Visual Supports Starter Set here. You can find the spring break social story in the Social Story Library by clicking here. Simply choose the home or school category and scroll down until you see the title “Spring Break”. If you would like to learn more about using visual schedules to improve transitions, click here. If you use visual supports in your classroom or home, you are ..read more
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Circle Time For Preschool Special Education
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
1M ago
Establishing structured and predictable routines is paramount, particularly when it comes to engaging autistic learners during morning meetings or circle time. These routines not only provide comfort and security but also enhance understanding and reduce anxiety. We’ll explore three effective strategies to establish predictable routines for circle time, specifically tailored for learners who are new to small group gatherings. Why Predictable Routines are Essential: Comfort and Security: Predictable routines offer a sense of comfort and security to autistic children, allowing them to feel saf ..read more
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Free Valentine Gift For You!
Autism Little Learners Blog
by autismlittlelearners
2M ago
I have a free Valentine’s gift just for you! Try out an errorless interactive visual book and see how your student or child likes it. Click here for the free book. If you like this interactive visual book, you will LOVE the Adapted Book Library. It’s filled with visuals and activities for hundreds of adapted books and dozens of interactive visual books (errorless, matching, and some higher-level concepts)for the early childhood level. Get access to the Adapted Book Library here. If you use visual supports in your classroom or home, you are going to want to sign up for this free Visual Support ..read more
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Autism: Routines Are Key!
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
2M ago
Predictable routines…they are everything when you are teaching young autistic children. We’ll discuss why predictable routines are so important and also about HOW to get started implementing a few in your own classroom! Predictable routines are lifelines for autistic students. Here’s why: 1. Stability and Reduced Anxiety in Predictable Routines Imagine a world where every day feels like stepping into the unknown, where you can’t predict what will happen next. For many autistic students, this is their reality, which can lead to heightened anxiety levels. Predictable routines act as a beacon of ..read more
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Self Regulation: Foundation For Learning
Autism Little Learners Blog
by Lindsay Van Voorst
2M ago
When little ones start growing up, they’re not just learning about the things around them – they’re also figuring out how to control their feelings and actions. This is so important because regulation is the foundation for learning. In this post, we will talk about why supporting regulation is so crucial for autistic children, and what self-regulation and co-regulation mean. I’ll also share some easy tips for parents and teachers who want to work proactively to prevent dysregulation. The start of a new school year is an opportune time to reflect on how we support our students self-regulation ..read more
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