Writing retreats build community among academic hospitalists
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
2w ago
IT’S A PERENNIAL problem in academic hospital medicine: Only seasoned and senior authors have protected time to do research, let alone write that research up and put together a grant proposal. According to Christopher Bonafide, MD, MSCE, an academic hospitalist in the section of hospital medicine of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP), his group does have a protected-time program. Clinical hospitalists who are accepted into that program can dedicate between 5% and 20% of their time to work on a research project for between six and 12 months. But as Dr. Bonafide points out, most academi ..read more
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Throughput innovations: one hospital’s solutions to improve length of stay
Today's Hospitalist
by Today's Hospitalist
3w ago
WHILE THROUGHPUT in hospitals has always been king, it is now—with staffing shortages, an aging population and consistently high volumes—more critical than ever. To meet that challenge, clinicians and staff at St. Mary’s Medical Center in Huntington, W. Va., the largest of the four hospitals in the Marshall Health Network, have in the past year put in place a series of throughput innovations. As Rob Hayes, MD, MHA, chief of the hospital-based specialties division and medical director of the hospitalist service, points out, that suite of innovations has cut length of stay in the observation un ..read more
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How much paid time off do hospitalists get?
Today's Hospitalist
by Edward Doyle
3w ago
HOW COMMON is paid time off for hospitalists? According to the 2023 Today’s Hospitalist Compensation & Career Survey, the majority of hospitalists—64.3%—receive no paid for their time off at all. Of the roughly one-third that do receive some pay when they are off, the average amount is 2.7 weeks per year. Pediatric hospitalists are much more likely to receive paid time off than their adult counterparts. Our data found that 61% said they are compensated for time off compared to 32% of adult hospitalists. Pediatric hospitalists also said they received more paid time off—an average of 4.4 we ..read more
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A doctor’s struggle for patient care
Today's Hospitalist
by Today's Hospitalist
1M ago
“I MAYBE HAVE a tiny shred of compassion.” A doctor I know wrote this in reference to a person they’d never met, a person who had been verbally abusive to many health care professionals. A person who was a prospective patient. A tiny shred of compassion. Maybe. I had met the patient in question, was the physician caring for them in the hospital. I was trying to find a PCP who would take care of them after discharge. They were a person of color and they were poor. They were living out of their car but too proud to admit it. They had a low paying job doing hard, honest work that took a toll on ..read more
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Flexible scheduling: smoother workflow, happier doctors?
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
1M ago
SEVERAL HOSPITALIST GROUPS have moved to create flexible scheduling for their staff given the heightened need to reduce physician burnout and improve retention. These changes reflect studies including a literature review posted this year by Global Advances in Integrative Medicine and Health that looked at the prevalence of burnout among women clinicians. In 22% of the studies included, reduced burnout was linked to working in a supportive environment, identified in part as one that offers flexible scheduling. But according to 2023 Society of Hospital Medicine survey data, only one-quarter (24 ..read more
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Matching shift-start times to workflow
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
1M ago
THE HOSPITALISTS WITH Virginia Mason Franciscan Health (VMFH) in Tacoma, Wash., have been working to understand their workflow. That’s the only way, they find, to maintain adequate staffing and sustainable workloads. With 160 hospitalists, the group staffs six separate hospitals in the same system. Day providers used to work a combination of shorter dedicated rounding days and longer ones (12 or 13 hours) to cover late afternoon admissions. But now, group members are transitioning to consistent 12-hour shifts instead. Why? As Ishmael Ching, MD, one of the system’s associate medical directors ..read more
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Different strengths, skills, personalities
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
1M ago
AT UNITYPOINT HEALTH-MERITER Hospital in Madison, Wis., flexible scheduling allows the group to capitalize on the skill sets and strengths of different physicians. “Different demographics prefer different shifts and schedules,” points out Dr. Jaskunas. “It’s not just the type of shift, but the days of the week and the hours of the day. Some personalities, skills and strengths match up better with some shifts than with others.” “Flexibility requires creativity, hard work and openness to change.” Jeremy Jaskunas, MD UnityPoint Health-Meriter Hospital But several factors in the past few years h ..read more
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Making the most of scheduling software
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
1M ago
FOR THE HOSPITALISTS at the University of New Mexico Hospital in Albuquerque, scheduling software has helped them achieve targeted flexibility with different kinds of shifts. Christopher Smith, MD, section chief of hospital medicine, says that historically, the academic hospitalists rounded with residents seven-on/seven-off. But “over time, the hospital has asked more and more of us, each resulting in new and different roles,” Dr. Smith says. Those different roles, as well as the fact that the group just kept getting bigger, “drove a natural process to need different kinds of shifts.” But “ov ..read more
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Seasonal staffing
Today's Hospitalist
by Phyllis Maguire
1M ago
AFTER EXPERIMENTING with different flexible shift options, the hospitalists with Williamson Health’s Williamson Medical Center in Franklin, Tenn., have turned to seasonal staffing to help right-size the number of physicians onsite. Their experimentation with flexible scheduling began in 2019. That’s when group members could choose to do eight-hour rounding shifts if they wanted to, in addition to the 12-hour, seven-on/seven-off schedule the group had maintained for years. The idea was to give colleagues what hospitalist director Bradley Bullock, MD, calls “a real life, even during weeks when ..read more
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Are hospitalists more or less satisfied than when they started in medicine?
Today's Hospitalist
by Edward Doyle
2M ago
ARE HOSPITALISTS more or less satisfied with their careers than when they started working in medicine? When we asked that question in the 2023 Today’s Hospitalist Compensation & Career Survey, we found nearly equal numbers of hospitalists who said they were both less and more satisfied. Among all hospitalists, about one-third (34%) said they were more satisfied, about one third (35%) said they were less satisfied and 30% said their satisfaction levels hadn’t changed much at all. Here’s a closer look at the data on changes in hospitalists’ career satisfaction from our survey. Specialty/tea ..read more
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