Roads reduce breeding occupancy and productivity in barn owls
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Brian T. Busby, Michael P. Gordon, Jim Belthoff
1w ago
We investigated effects of roads and urban areas on barn owl breeding occupancy and productivity to provide information to potentially help guide the placement of nest boxes. We found that both productivity and the likelihood of breeding occupancy decreased with increasing proximity of nest boxes to roads, but did not find that the proportion of urban area surrounding nest boxes substantially influenced either. We recommend land managers place nest boxes for barn owls farther from roads when possible to increase the probability of breeding occupancy and to foster higher productivity. Abstrac ..read more
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Moose in wolf diets across northeastern Minnesota
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Yvette Chenaux‐Ibrahim, Seth A. Moore, Steve K. Windels, William J. Severud, Ron A. Moen
1w ago
We evaluated the importance of moose in wolf diets via scat analysis; most wolf prey consisted of white-tailed deer, moose, and beaver. Preference for moose depended on the relative densities of prey species, indicating that management of alternate prey could influence predation upon moose. Abstract The moose (Alces alces; mooz in Anishinaabemowin, Ojibwe language) population has recently declined in Minnesota, USA, and gray wolf (Canis lupus; ma'iingan) predation is likely a contributing factor. We analyzed diet composition of gray wolves in northeastern Minnesota during 2011–2013 to evalua ..read more
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Influences of aquatic and terrestrial habitat characteristics on abundance patterns of adult wood turtles
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Jena M. Staggs, Donald J. Brown, Andrew F. Badje, James T. Anderson, Lena V. Carlson, Carly N. Lapin, Madaline M. Cochrane, Ron A. Moen
1w ago
We conducted wood turtle population surveys at 57 sites in Wisconsin and Minnesota and assessed the influence of aquatic and terrestrial habitat characteristics on abundance. We found that 2 aquatic and 2 terrestrial variables best explained variation in abundance across the study sites. Our results can inform forest management strategies to improve habitat quality for wood turtles and assist managers with locating potentially robust populations in under-surveyed areas. Abstract Wood turtles (Glyptemys insculpta) are a species of conservation concern throughout their geographic distribution ..read more
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Effects of ungulate‐proof fencing on space use by wild pigs
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Kelly Koriakin, D. Buck Jolley, Benjamin Smith, Kurt C. VerCauteren, Nathan P. Snow
1w ago
We examined changes in spatial movement behaviors of wild pigs with the construction and completion of ungulate-proof fencing in Guam from February 2021 to March 2022. Wild pigs nearer the fence decreased their space use and enclosed wild pigs increased overlap between conspecifics. We recommend increasing trap sites nearer the fence to maximize wild pig control activities. In addition, wild pigs inside the fence should be eradicated quickly to minimize secondary damages to native flora and fauna and decrease disease risk. Abstract Wild pigs (Sus scrofa) are a highly adaptable species that h ..read more
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The Codex of the Endangered Species Act: The First Fifty Years (Volume 1) By Lowell E. Baier, Lanham, Maryland: Rowman and Littlefield. 2023. pp. 864. $99.00 (hardcover). ISBN 978‐1538112076
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Leopoldo Miranda‐Castro
2w ago
The Journal of Wildlife Management, EarlyView ..read more
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Downed wood removal effects on survival and site fidelity of woodrats in a California oak woodland
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Timothy J. Smyser, Michael A. Hardy, Amy J. Davis, William L. Preston, William D. Tietje
3w ago
From 2004–2009, we used a before-after-control-impact study design to assess the effects of an experimental removal of downed wood while also evaluating the influence of other habitat attributes on a population of big-eared woodrats (Neotoma macrotis) in otherwise undisturbed oak (Quercus spp.) woodlands in coastal-central California. Woodrat survival, site fidelity, abundance, and reproduction were positively associated with increasing measures of habitat complexity, demonstrating that fuels management practices for wildfire mitigation need to consider the ecological benefits of snags and do ..read more
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Discrimination among similarly colored goose species in federal harvest surveys
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Joshua L. Dooley, Paul F. Doherty Jr., David L. Otis, Gary C. White, Daniel R. Taylor, Doreen L. Griffin, Stephen C. Chandler, Stephanie M. Catino, Kathy K. Fleming, Robert V. Raftovich, Antoinette J. Piaggio
3w ago
We evaluated genetic- and morphological-based methods to discriminate between cackling (Branta hutchinsii) versus Canada (B. canadensis) geese (dark geese) and Ross's (Anser rossii) versus snow (A. caerulescens) geese (light geese) tail feather samples submitted to the United States Fish and Wildlife Service Parts Collection Survey. We found a greater ability to discriminate between dark geese than light geese, and genetic-based methods were more accurate than morphological-based methods. We recommended new genetic-based central tail feather length thresholds to separate dark geese and that m ..read more
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Wild birds and the ecology of antimicrobial resistance: an approach to monitoring
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Tullia Guardia, Lorena Varriale, Adriano Minichino, Rosario Balestrieri, Danila Mastronardi, Tamara Pasqualina Russo, Ludovico Dipineto, Alessandro Fioretti, Luca Borrelli
1M ago
Wildlife and wild birds are recognized as an important bridge between environment, humans, and livestock in perpetuating AMR. It is fundamental to standardize and optimize a wild bird monitoring approach for AMR surveillance that includes non-invasive sampling methods, culture-independent techniques for ARG identification, and database integration and implementation. A multidisciplinary perspective could involve veterinarians, biologists, ornithologists and conservationists and may represent a part of the solution, considering that the ultimate goal is to reverse the route of AMR and try to c ..read more
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Wolverine density, survival, and population trends in the Canadian boreal forest
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Matthew A. Scrafford, Jacob L. Seguin, Laura K. McCaw, Mark S. Boyce, Justina C. Ray
1M ago
We estimated wolverine density, survival, and population trend at boreal forest field sites in northwestern Alberta and northwestern Ontario, Canada. Wolverine density was 6.74 individuals/1,000 km2 in Alberta and 3.64 individuals/1,000 km2 in Ontario. Our wolverine survival estimates contributed to evidence of population decline in Alberta and stability in Ontario. Wolverine population growth could be achieved by limiting human access to wolverine habitats. Abstract There is limited information available on wolverine (Gulo gulo) population density and trends in the boreal forest of North Am ..read more
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Wildlife Stewardship on Tribal Lands: Our Place is in Our SoulBy Serra J. Hoaglandand Steven Albert (Eds.), Baltimore, Maryland: Johns Hopkins University Press. 2023. pp. 432. $59.95 (hardcover). ISBN 978‐1‐4214‐4657‐8
Wiley » The Journal of Wildlife Management
by Johanna M. H. Ford, Ambar A. Melendez Perez, Lindsey A. W. Gapinski, Juliana M. Kaloczi, Michael Rohde, Taylor Siddons, Riggs O. Wilson, Aaron A. Yappert, Robert W. Klaver
1M ago
The Journal of Wildlife Management, EarlyView ..read more
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