Parents vs clinicians: a path to resolution
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
6M ago
Parent-clinician conflict is a common reason that clinical ethicists become involved in children’s care. The genesis of the conflict is often quite early in the course of the child’s illness and the situation builds to a crisis when there is a difficult decision to be made. Clinicians and ethicists have a traditional way of considering the problem confronting the child. In this podcast Bry Moore and Ros McDougall offer a different lens through which to see the problem and, ideally, find a fresh way to consider the conflict and manage a path to resolution. Guests: Associate Professor Bryan ..read more
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13th National Paediatric Bioethics Conference 2022: Friends of the CBC hypothetical
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
9M ago
A hypothetical case discussion sponsored by the Friends of the Children's Bioethics Centre Auxiliary. "Nadia" is a 15-year-old girl with cystic fibrosis who needs a permanent intravenous infusion device to facilitate her treatment. Her parents, of Indian heritage, are unwilling to agree to this. They are planning a family gathering and arranged marriage for Nadia and the infusion device will interfere with their plans. A panel of experts from the CBC, Profs Lynn Gillam, Clare Delany and Dr Georgina Hall, supported by a virtual panel from the RCH Clinical Ethics Response Group, wrestle with the ..read more
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13th National Paediatric Bioethics Conference 2022: Abandoned or relinquished? Challenges for hospital staff
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
9M ago
Jack Southwell, a Social Worker at RCH, describes the moral environment when looking after a child left in the care of the hospital. He discusses the technical differences between abandonment and relinquishment but posits that there is no real difference for staff. The child left in hospital care poses ethical concerns for the child, the staff, the parents and, importantly, the relationship between them all. Jack examines the moral and psychological toll this relationship poses for staff. This presentation won the Patron's Prize for the best presentation at the 2022 conference. The session is ..read more
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13th National Paediatric Bioethics Conference 2022: Vaccinating young people against parental wishes
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
10M ago
An expert panel explores the issues that arise when young people request vaccination for COVID-19 against the wishes of their parents. Dr Veronica Cerrati presents a case of a 14-year-old girl with type-1 diabetes requesting a COVID vaccine from her GP. Associate Prof Margie Danchin explains the medical benefits and risks and clinical approach she would take with a young person in this situation. Prof John Tobin explains how this sits within a human rights framework, drawing on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child. Prof Paula O’Brien considers the legal aspects, including Gillick compe ..read more
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Classic Conundrum: Children as haematopoietic stem cell donors: The role of an advocate
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
10M ago
Haematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation has become the standard treatment for a range of diseases in children and adults. Children, sometimes as young as six months of age may be asked to act as HSC donors, usually for their siblings. This is because siblings are most likely to be an ‘HLA match’. In this episode we explore the ethical issues when clinical teams and parents ask for children to be bone-marrow or peripheral blood stem cell donors for a sick sibling. Host: Prof John Massie, RCH. Guest: A/Prof Michael Marks, RCH senior paediatrician and donor advocate. Ethicist: Sharon Feldm ..read more
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13th National Paediatric Bioethics Conference 2022: Addressing conflict: an introduction to empathic curiosity
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
10M ago
Professor Jodi Halpern introduces the audience to empathic curiosity, a concept that she has developed through her work in psychiatry, paediatrics and clinical ethics. Prof Halpern explains how sympathy may come naturally to many clinicians but is often an unhelpful response to difficulties that patients and parents of sick children face. What is needed is an empathic response that engages the patient and parent and supports the medical decisions that need to be made. Prof Halpern offers a series of steps to operationalise empathic curiosity and build a therapeutic alliance, even if there has ..read more
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Deciding with Children S2 Ep4: Beyond Disability
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
1y ago
In the clinical care of children who have a disability, the processes of deciding with children can present different challenges. Children who have a disability may have limited ability to understand the decision to be made or difficulties communicating their preferences. In this episode, paediatrician Dr Giuliana Antolovich reorientates us to misunderstandings about disability which are often created by preconceived notions of what children with disabilities can do. She challenges us to centre the child in the consultation, listen carefully to their preferences and values, and include these i ..read more
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Deciding with Children S2 Ep3: Finding My Voice
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
1y ago
Transition to adult services is an important step for patients who have been cared for in a children’s hospital or by a paediatrician. This is a process (transition) rather than an event (transfer) and takes both time and careful curation for the young person and their parents. The goal is to help develop the young person as an independent medical decision-maker at the same time as facilitating the parents’ role to switch from parent to patient advocate. There are many barriers to transition: willingness of the clinician to ‘let-go’; the patient's and parents' fears about a new environment and ..read more
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Deciding with Children S2 Ep2: Is deciding with children a human right?
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
1y ago
In paediatric practice, decision-making for children gradually shifts from parents making all the decisions for their child, in collaboration with the child’s doctors, to the young person becoming more involved in their own decision-making. This shift, which is based on an emerging autonomy in the child, brings with it a concurrent need for parents and clinicians alike to step back and to listen to the child, as they develop capacity for holding views about their healthcare. The self-regarding nature of medical decisions generates a strong obligation for young people's views to be heard about ..read more
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The voices of experience: the ethics of partnering with families in paediatric research
Essential Ethics
by The Royal Children's Hospital, Melbourne
1y ago
Practicing family centred care is considered best practice in paediatric clinical care, so why isn’t this widely adopted in paediatric research? The voices of experience include those of the children and families. Therefore, partnering with families in research should also be considered best practice. In this episode we explore this concept through an ethical lens – what are the benefits and challenges of engaging families in research? How do we honour the family experience? How do we ensure the important voices are heard? What do we need to be able to do this effectively? Host ..read more
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