Fishermen Vs U-Boats
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
1d ago
During the First and Second World Wars British fishing trawlers were turned into the Royal Naval Patrol Reserve to help clear the seas of mines and even take on the deadly U-Boats. They became known as 'Harry Tate’s Navy' - a nod towards the celebrity comedian known for his bungling of everyday tasks and slipshod approach to life. Taking this wry criticism on the chin the fishermen-turned naval personnel embraced it and Harry Tate's Navy became a byword for exceptional resource fullness and courage in the face of appalling difficulty and danger. To find out more Dr Sam Willis spoke with the hi ..read more
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Shipbuilding at Barrow-in-Furness
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
1w ago
This episode was recorded at the fabulous Dockyard Museum in Barrow-in-Furness during the filming of their magnificent collection of ship models for the Lloyds Register Foundation's project 'Maritime Innovation In Miniature'. In the last quarter of the nineteenth century Barrow experienced one of the fastest and most extraordinary transformations in history when it changed from a small farm to one one of the largest and most successful shipbuilding centres in the world in just a handful of years. Dr Sam Willis speaks with John Irving, Barrow local and premises manager at the Dockyard Museum to ..read more
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Iconic Ships 19: HMS Agamemnon - Nelson's Favourite Ship
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
2w ago
Our series on Iconic Ships continues with one of the most battle-honoured ships of Nelson's Navy: HMS Agamemnon. Today we got back to those days of the wooden walls to hear about this 64-gun Third Rate that saw service in the American Revolutionary War, the French Revolutionary War and the Napoleonic War. She fought in many of the major naval battles of those conflicts and had a reputation as being Nelson’s favourite ship. After a remarkably eventful career her working life ended in 1809 when she was wrecked off the River Plate on the coast of Uruguay. The location of the wreck has been known ..read more
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Maritime Africa 5: The World Heritage Sites of Songo Mnara and Kilwa Kisiwani
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
3w ago
We continue our mini-series on maritime Africa with an episode on Songo Mnara and Kilwa, two significant maritime settlements on the Swahili Coast. In the previous episode we heard how the Swahili coast of east Africa is particularly rich in its maritime cultural heritage and trading past, where African and Arabic cultures have mixed for centuries across the Indian Ocean. In this episode we investigate two locations in great depth, both Swahili stone towns that made their place in global maritime history. Dr Sam Willis spoke with Mercy Mbogelah, who manages the ruins of both sites for UNESCO W ..read more
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Maritime Africa 4: The Swahili Coast
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
1M ago
We continue our mini-series on maritime Africa with an episode on the Swahili coast – a fascinating part of east Africa particularly rich in its maritime cultural heritage and trading past. The Swahili coast is distinctive for its mixture of African and Arabic cultures and the way that the two have been bound together by maritime trade across the Indian Ocean. There is also clear Chinese influence here as well, reflecting historic maritime trade routes thousands of miles longer and which date back to the Middle Ages. To find out more Dr Sam Willis spoke with Dr Stephanie Wynne- Jones form the ..read more
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Victory at Sea in WW2
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
1M ago
In this episode Dr Sam Willis speaks with Professor Paul Kennedy about the fundamental change in the balance of naval power and the strategic landscape that occurred in the Second World War. By the end of the war, the Italian, German, Japanese and French navies had been all but eliminated; the era of the big-gunned surface vessel ended; and America had risen as an economic and military power larger than anything that world had ever seen before. Paul Kennedy is the J. Richardson Dilworth professor of British History at Yale most well known for his 1976 book The Rise and Fall of British Naval Ma ..read more
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How to Map the Ocean Floor: The Challenger Expedition 1872-1876
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
2M ago
On 7 December 1872 the Challenger expedition set sail from Sheerness. It’s purpose was conceived just two years earlier, in 1870, by Charles Wyville Thomson Professor of Natural History at Edinburgh University. Thomson had managed to persuade the Royal Society of London to ask the British Government to furnish one of Her Majesty's ships for a prolonged voyage of exploration across the oceans of the globe….a voyage of deep-sea exploration, unique for its scale of ambition and scope. Their job was to do nothing les than map the ocean floor and search for life in the abyss. This remarkable exped ..read more
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Freak Ships of the Nineteenth Century III: Cigar Ships
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
2M ago
Freak Ships of the Nineteenth Century is the title of a pamphlet written in 1966 by J. Guthrie, then an employee of the maritime classification society Lloyds Register. It was written for private circulation amongst the staff. Guthrie realised that, as the premier classification society Lloyds Register were able to produce a very good technical description of vessels, often directly from plans, reports and records of conventional ships. But this left a gap in their knowledge - 'But what of the unorthodox ships, the rebels from tradition: those monsters and freaks of the nautical world which, t ..read more
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Maritime Africa 3: African Whaling
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
2M ago
Our third episode dedicated to the maritime history of Africa. We find out about indigenous African whaling; European and American exploitation of African waters; the numerous uses to which whale products were put both in Africa and abroad; the written and the archaeological evidence available for the study of whaling in Africa. To find out more Dr Sam Willis spoked with Dr. Lynn Harris who has worked as a maritime historian and underwater archaeologist for over 40 years in South Africa, Namibia, Costa Rica, North and South Carolina and is currently employed as a Professor at the Program of Ma ..read more
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Iconic Ships 19: Preussen
The Mariner's Mirror Podcast
by The Society for Nautical Research and the Lloyds Register Foundation
3M ago
Preussen was a marvel of a ship. A steel-hulled, five-masted, ship-rigged sailing ship built in 1902 and named after the German kingdom of Prussia. Until the launch of Royal Clipper in 2000, a sail cruise liner, Preussen was the only five-masted full-rigged ship ever built and carried six square sails on each mast. Not only did she have a fascinating career at a time when the sun was setting on the great clipper ships, she also had a fascinating and abrupt end in 1910, and ended up wrecked in the English Channel near Dover. Parts of her hull can still be seen today. To find out more Dr Sam ..read more
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