Issue Information
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by
1M ago
No abstract is available for this article ..read more
Visit website
NEW PRODUCTS, NEW TASTES? AGRICULTURAL INNOVATIONS AND CONTINUITIES BETWEEN THE NINTH AND FOURTH CENTURIES BC IN MEDITERRANEAN IBERIA
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Guillem Pérez‐Jordà, Leonor Peña‐Chocarro
1M ago
Summary The encounters between the immigrant populations of the Levant and the local communities of the south and east of the Iberian peninsula occurring from the beginning of the first millennium led to the transformation of diet and agricultural production. The arrival of new products such as chickpeas and different fruit trees, including in particular the vine, increased the variety and quality of the food consumed. It was at this specific moment that the so-called ‘Mediterranean agricultural model’ was defined, upon which the identity of the different communities living in this territory w ..read more
Visit website
Connections to the Pompeii water supply network: artisanal and commercial establishments as places that consume water
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Elena H. Sánchez López
2M ago
Summary Analyses of the urban distribution of the water supplied from aqueducts have generally focused on those elements directly referred to by Vitruvius (De Arch. 8.6.2): fountains, baths and houses. However, excavations in Pompeii, which has one of the best-preserved water supply networks from antiquity, have revealed that other places also benefited from these connections, including those with an artisanal or commercial purpose. This paper compiles the available information related to water supply in Pompeii and complementary data from new field documentation. It analyses the distribution ..read more
Visit website
MASSIVE PREHISTORIC PIT SITES IN SOUTHERN IBERIA: CHALLENGES, OPPORTUNITIES AND LESSONS LEARNED
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by María José Armenteros‐Lojo, Víctor Jiménez‐Jáimez
2M ago
Summary Archaeological sites characterized by significant concentrations of pits (‘pit sites’) were widespread in prehistoric Europe. In southern Iberia, many pit sites date back to the Late Neolithic and Chalcolithic periods (fourth-third millennia BCE), and often display massive numbers of pits. Deciphering the social, economic, and symbolic significance of such sites, composed of hundreds or even thousands of pits, holds deep historical implications. What do these pits mean, and how were they used? If they functioned as grain storage pits, as many believe, did they represent a substantial e ..read more
Visit website
OPPIDUM VOCANT, QUIDVIS CUM VALLO ATQUE FOSSA. SOME THOUGHTS ON OPPIDA, CENTRAL PLACES, AND SOCIAL COMPLEXITY IN THE EUROPEAN IRON AGE
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Samuel Nión‐Álvarez
3M ago
Summary The following paper presents an analysis of the term ‘oppidum’, discussing its value for understanding social complexity in Iron Age Europe. Throughout this paper, the most relevant debates regarding the oppida and their value are synthesized from a semiotic point of view. Key features such as urban planning, social hierarchies and political centralization are analysed to frame research in terms of Iron Age mentalities and cultural diversity. Accordingly, the ‘oppidum’ is assessed as a conceptual tool, weighing its appropriateness as a wide-ranging concept in the European Iron Age. Sev ..read more
Visit website
Issue Information
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by
4M ago
No abstract is available for this article ..read more
Visit website
MAKING A DIFFERENCE: PALAEOLITHIC ICONOGRAPHY AS A TRAIT OF IDENTITY IN THE IBERIAN PENINSULA
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Miguel García‐Bustos, Olivia Rivero
5M ago
Summary The study of the figurative repertoire of Palaeolithic artists allows us to approach aspects such as iconographic diffusion and cultural preferences. This paper presents an updated corpus of figurative rock art for the Iberian peninsula and analyses its distribution in the Cantabrian region, inland Iberia and the Mediterranean basin, three areas frequently used in the literature. This corpus contains 3341 graphic units that were analysed using multivariate statistics and hypothesis testing. The results show that the main figurative themes can be classified according to their discrimina ..read more
Visit website
A NARRATIVE TURN: HUMAN AGENCY IN ROCK CARVINGS AT NÄMFORSEN, NORTHERN SWEDEN
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Peter Skoglund, Michael Ranta, Tomas Persson, Anna Cabak Rédei, Jan Magne Gjerde
5M ago
Summary The idea to create pictorial narratives seems to have occurred long after humans learned to produce iconic images, that is, depictions based on visual similarity to external objects. In Scandinavia, e.g. in Gärde, Sweden or Stykket and Bøla, Norway, early Mesolithic images (e.g. rock carvings from before c.5000 BCE) often feature animals that are solitary or without suggestion of causal or narrative relations to other figures, although they sometimes are grouped by proximity or are superimposed on each other. Notable is also the almost complete absence of human figures. However, i ..read more
Visit website
Piecing together the story of a pair of Makron’s fragmented cups
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by David W. J. Gill, Christos Tsirogiannis
5M ago
Summary In 2022, an Athenian red-figured cup attributed to Makron was returned to Italy by New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. The cup had been acquired in fragments, through purchase and gift, from multiple sources over several years, starting with two fragments from the restorer Fritz Bürki in 1978. A second cup, also attributed to Makron, was acquired in a parallel way. The sources for the fragments from both cups point to galleries collectors and donors – Summa Galleries, Frieda Tchachos, Elizabeth Hecht, and Dietrich von Bothmer – who have been associated with other material that has b ..read more
Visit website
Secrets Of The Drava: Bronze Age Metalwork In Continental Croatia
Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology
by Andreja Kudelić, Ana Franjić, Snježana Vrdoljak, Miljana Radivojević
6M ago
Summary The article presents a group of Bronze Age artefacts recovered from the Drava river wetlands in continental Croatia, examining their typological and chronological markers, and assessing the technological characteristics of the material through spectrometric and use-wear analyses. We discuss the context of the finds, types of items retrieved and deposition locations, and how these fit into the patterns of European Bronze Age metal deposition practices. Compositional and metalwork use analyses indicate that most of the items were in use prior to their deposition and display solid metallu ..read more
Visit website

Follow Wiley Online Library » Oxford Journal of Archaeology on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR