Production and perception of stop voicing in Central Australian Aboriginal English: A cross-generational study
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Yizhou Wang Carmel O’Shannessy Vanessa Davis Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen Joshua Roberts Denise Foster University of Melbourne, Australian National University, Tangentyere Council, University of Melbourne & MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University, Australian National University and Tangentyere CouncilYizhou Wang is a teaching associate in Linguistics and Applied Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. His research areas include phonetics and phonology, speech production and perception, applied linguistics, and languages in Australia.Carmel O’Shannessy is an Associate Professor in the School of Literature, Languages and Linguistics at the Australian National University. Her research is in language contact and acquisition, including the emergence of Light Warlpiri, a new Australian mixed language, and children’s development of Light Warlpiri and Warlpiri. Her ARC Future Fellowship project explores aspects of Indigenous children’s language development in Central Australia. She has been involved with languages and education in remote Indigenous communities in Australia since 1996, in the areas of bilingual education and research.Vanessa Davis is a Senior Aboriginal Researcher at the Tangentyere Research Hub in Mparntwe, Alice Springs. She has more than two decades’ experience in social research work, evaluation and data input and analysis. Vanessa has the linguistic and cultural knowledge to conduct respectful, community-identified and community-partnered research, which she undertakes across research topics spanning language acquisition, wellbeing, housing and energy.Rikke Bundgaard-Nielsen is a Senior Lecturer in the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne and an Adjunct Research Fellow at MARCS Institute for Brain, Behaviour and Development at Western Sydney University. Her research areas include the acquisition of first and second language phonology, the role of vocabulary acquisition in phonological development, and first and second language speech perception and processing, with a particular focus on Australian Indigenous languages.Joshua Roberts holds an MA in Linguistics from Memorial University of Newfoundland, and worked on a potential covert contrast in child acquisition of English rhotics. He was involved in the Little Kids Learning Languages project, and is currently working outside of academia.Denise Foster is a Senior Aboriginal Researcher at the Tangentyere Research Hub in Mparntwe, Alice Springs. She has extensive experience in social research work, evaluation and data input and analysis, and conducts respectful, community-identified and community-partnered research.
2w ago
..read more
Visit website
A semantic typology of emotion nouns in Australian Indigenous languages
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Eleanor YacopettiMaïa PonsonnetMonash University & The University of Western Australia and Dynamique du Langage (CNRS) & The University of Western AustraliaEleanor Yacopetti studies semantics, variation and mental representations of language, with a focus on Australian Indigenous languages. She is a PhD candidate at Monash University, investigating spatial reference in the Kune variety of Bininj Kunwok, a Gunwinyguan language of Arnhem Land, Northern Territory.Maïa Ponsonnet is Chargée de Recherche at the French Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique in Lyon (Dynamique du Langage) and Adjunct Research Fellow at the University of Western Australia. She has worked extensively with Indigenous communities from the Top End, and published extensively on how emotion is expressed in the languages of Indigenous Australia.
3M ago
..read more
Visit website
Navigating language maintenance challenges with health professionals: Reflections from Spanish speaking families in Australia
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Suzanne GrassoMonash UniversitySuzanne Grasso works as a Spanish interpreter and translator, teaching associate and research consultant. She is a PhD candidate at Monash University where she is investigating the role of health professionals in supporting parents to raise their children in their heritage languages. Her research interests include intercultural communication, multilingualism, heritage language maintenance, language education and language policy.
5M ago
..read more
Visit website
The Eastman transcripts: A case study calling Australian linguists to action against legal misconceptions about language in forensic evidence
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Helen FraserThe University of MelbourneHelen Fraser studied linguistics, specializing in phonetics, at Macquarie University and the University of Edinburgh, then worked for many years at the University of New England, NSW, where her theoretical and practical interests revolved around the representation of spoken language – both internally, in the minds of language-users, and externally, in writing and transcripts. Casework experience, starting in the 1990s, led her to research specifically on forensic transcription. In 2017, she instigated a call to action, led by the Australian Linguistic Society and endorsed by three other national organizations, asking the judiciary to review and reform problematic legal practices in relation to transcription of poor-quality audio used as forensic evidence in criminal trials. Following more than a decade as an independent researcher and consultant, in 2020 she became the inaugural Director of the Research Hub for Language in Forensic Evidence at the University of Melbourne.
5M ago
..read more
Visit website
Apologizing in Kodhi
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Yustinus Ghanggo AteCharbel El-KhaissiThe Australian National University (ANU) & Universitas Katolik Weetebula and ANUYustinus Ghanggo Ate is a doctoral student at The Australian National University working on the language documentation and description of Kodhi/Kodi. His research interests include endangered language documentation and description, and theoretical linguistics with a focus on morphology and syntax.Charbel El-Khaissi is a doctoral student of historical linguistics at The Australian National University where he uses computer-assisted methods to analyze the development of definiteness in Aramaic. His research interests include formal syntax, corpus linguistics and Semitic languages.
5M ago
..read more
Visit website
A typological study on the syntactic variations of counterfactual clauses
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Qian YongHaoran MaJinan University and Hong Kong UniversityQian Yong is an associate professor at the college of Foreign Studies, Jinan University. Her primary research area is linguistic typology based on large-scale language samples. Her research captures linguistic diversities, especially on endangered languages, and is committed to the establishment and improvement of databases of the world's languages.Haoran Ma studies at the University of Hong Kong, Master of Arts in Linguistics. His current interests include the linguistic typology of aspect, typology of languages in China and comparative study on Tibeto-Burman languages.
6M ago
..read more
Visit website
A quantitative study of the polysemy of Mandarin Chinese perception verb kàn ‘look/see’
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Shuqiong WuYue OuSichuan International Studies UniversityShuqiong Wu is a professor of linguistics at Sichuan International Studies University. Her main research areas are Cognitive Linguistics, corpus linguistics and lexical semantics. Her present research focuses primarily on quantitative studies of lexis and grammar based on corpus data. She has published on these topics in various journals such as Language Sciences, Corpus Linguistics and Linguistic Theory, Review of Cognitive Linguistics, Discourse & Society, and Language and Cognition.Yue Ou is a PhD student at Sichuan International Studies University, specializing in Cognitive Linguistics.
7M ago
..read more
Visit website
Towards an interactional grammar of interjections: Expressing compassion in four Australian languages
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Ilana MushinJoe BlytheJosua DahmenCaroline de DearRod GardnerFrancesco PossematoLesley Stirlinga School of Languages and Cultures, University of Queensland, Australiab Department of Linguistics, Macquarie University, Australiac State University of New York at Buffalo, USAd School of Languages and Linguistics, University of Melbourne, AustraliaIlana Mushin is Professor of Linguistics at the University of Queensland and co-editor of the journal Interactional Linguistics (Benjamins). Her research interests include interactional linguistics, conversation analysis, language typology, and the documentation and description of Australian Indigenous languages, especially Garrwa. She is the author of A grammar of (Western) Garrwa (Mouton, 2012).Joe Blythe is an Associate Professor in interactional linguistics. His research interests include gesture and embodiment, turn-taking, spatial cognition, language evolution, kinship concepts and social identities – particularly as instantiated within everyday conversation and as acquired by children. He leads Conversational Interaction in Aboriginal and Remote Australia, a comparative project funded by the Australian Research Council investigating conversational style in four Australian Aboriginal languages and in English varieties spoken by non-Aboriginal people in the Australian outback.Josua Dahmen is a postdoctoral researcher who uses an interactional-linguistic approach to study language structures in ordinary conversation. He has a special interest in the documentation and description of Australian First Nations languages and has been working in collaboration with the Jaru community in the north of Western Australia.Caroline de Dear is a doctoral researcher who is currently completing her dissertation on canonical and non-canonical questions in Gija conversations. Her research interests include Australian Indigenous languages, pointing and spatial language, nominal classification, interactional linguistics, and conversation analysis.Rod Gardner is Honorary Associate Professor at the University of Queenland. He has published conversation analysis research over 30 years, on ordinary conversation, classroom interaction and Australian Indigenous conversation, the last mostly on Garrwa with Ilana Mushin.Francesco Possemato is a postdoctoral researcher who uses conversation analysis and interactional linguistics to study language use in social interaction in everyday and institutional contexts. His research interests include pragmatic typology, bilingualism and language maintenance, and interactions involving speakers with acquired communication disorders.Lesley Stirling is Professor of Linguistics and Head of the School of Languages and Linguistics at the University of Melbourne. She has published in descriptive and typological linguistics, semantics, discourse analysis and psycholinguistics, including on the grammar of the Australian language Kala Lagaw Ya. Her current research focuses on the analysis of conversational interaction.
10M ago
..read more
Visit website
Uncovering ergative use in Murrinhpatha: Evidence from experimental data
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Rachel Nordlinger, Evan Kidd
1y ago
..read more
Visit website
Conceptualizations of gratitude: A comparative analysis of English and Persian dissertation acknowledgements written by Persian authors
Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics
by Ali Dabbagh, Mohammad R. Hashemi
1y ago
..read more
Visit website

Follow Taylor and Francis Online » Australian Journal of Linguistics on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR