The Old Ottawa Post Office
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
3d ago
30 April 1876 Ottawa Post Office, circa 1877, Library and Archives Canada, 3358751. One of Ottawa’s iconic buildings that is now lost to history was its old Post Office. It was the subject of countless post cards and photographs during its era. The building was located on the west side of the Rideau Canal, sandwiched between Sappers’ Bridge on its southern side and the Dufferin Bridge on its northern side. The first mail received in the new building arrived on Sunday, 30 April 1876, with the first batch of letters departing the facility that same evening. (Note that the Post Office was exempt ..read more
Visit website
Tobogganing in Old Ottawa
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
2w ago
10 March 1877 The Indigenous peoples of Canada have used toboggans since time immemorial for transporting goods and people over winter’s snowy and icy landscapes. Sometimes, a person on snowshoes pulled the toboggan using a cord around their forehead or shoulder. Other times, a dog or a team of dogs were used as the muscle.  These days, dogs have been replaced by snowmobiles. Regardless, the toboggan was and remains a practical and efficient means of moving freight over snow. Indigenous man on snowshoes with toboggan, 1847-50, Library and Archives Canada, 3838175. European settlers quickl ..read more
Visit website
The Arrival of Cable Television
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
1M ago
21 April 1962 When it comes to television viewing, we are spoiled with choice. There are six English-language networks in Canada—CBC, CTV, Global, Citytv, CTV2, and Yes TV—and three French-language networks—Radio Canada, TVA, and Noovo. In addition to these networks, which are available in most major urban centres, we can also watch the big American networks—CBS, NBC, ABC, PBS—and a host of specialized Canadian and foreign channels that provide tailored programming from news, to sports, to erotica, all delivered to your living room, or, ahem, bedroom, courtesy of the cable television companies ..read more
Visit website
The Birth of Women’s Hockey
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
1M ago
8 March 1889 The sport of ice hockey owes a huge debt of gratitude to Lord Stanley of Preston and his family. Not only did the noble lord, who was Canada’s Governor General from 1888 to 1893, donate the Cup that today signifies North American hockey supremacy, he and his children did much to popularize the sport. After attending a hockey game in Montreal at that city’s 1889 winter carnival, the Stanley family, along with members of the vice-regal staff, donned skates and picked up hockey sticks to play shinny on the outdoor rink at Rideau Hall. In that status-conscious time, the vice-regal sta ..read more
Visit website
Eastview’s Election Irregularities
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
2M ago
5 January 1920 Over the past few years, rumours of widespread election irregularities and voter fraud have gripped our neighbours south of the border despite the lack of any evidence that has stood up to court scrutiny. While Canada has so far avoided similar claims, we shouldn’t be too smug. Charges of voter fraud have occurred here. Indeed, so bad were the irregularities in municipal elections in Eastview, a suburban community neighbouring Ottawa, a hundred years ago, one mayor was unseated by the court, and another given a suspended sentence before his sentence was overturned on appeal. Eas ..read more
Visit website
The Byward Market in Flames
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
3M ago
28 April 1874 and 2 January 1957 While some buildings date back to the mid-nineteenth century, most structures in the Byward Market neighbourhood are newer, owing to recurring fires that have beset the area over the decades. Indeed, the current market building only dates to 1926, when the previous market building was destroyed by fire. Ottawa’s Byward Market is one of the capital’s top attractions for both residents and tourists. Home to the oldest and largest farmers’ market in the city, the streets surrounding the main market building host a myriad of restaurants and chic bars intermingled w ..read more
Visit website
The Statute of Westminster
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
3M ago
11 December 1931 One of the most important dates in Canada’s constitutional development from colony to independent country and for Ottawa as its capital is 11 December 1931. Yet, few Canadians know anything about what happened on that momentous day. This is perhaps not surprising. Even on that day more than ninety years ago, the event was scarcely noticed—no banner newspaper headlines, no fireworks, no celebrations. The Ottawa Journal didn’t even bother to cover the story. The Ottawa Citizen did, but the small article was sandwiched between an item about a University of Vermont student being l ..read more
Visit website
Canada at War with Japan
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
4M ago
8 December 1941 All those interested in history know the date 7 December 1941. This was, of course, the date of the surprise Japanese attack on the US naval base at Pearl Harbor in Hawaii. The attack, which commenced shortly before 8:00 am Hawaii time, took the lives of more than 2,300 service people and destroyed or damaged twenty-one US ships. The battleships Arizona and Oklahoma were complete right-offs. Several other battleships were also sunk in the attack though they were later refloated and restored to service. Also destroyed in the attack were almost two hundred US airplanes; scores mo ..read more
Visit website
Ogilvy’s
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
4M ago
18 November 1887 Once upon a time, Ottawa was the home of many high-quality, independent department stores. The discriminating shopper had a choice between Devlin’s and Murphy-Gamble on Sparks Street and Freiman’s, Ogilvy’s, Larocque’s, and Caplan’s only a short walk away on Rideau Street. However, one by one, they succumbed to changing tastes and the formidable competitive power of the national chain stores, such as Simpson-Sears, Eaton’s and The Bay. The last to fall was the doyen of the group—Ogilvy’s. The store, which could not compete with the opening of the glitzy Rideau Centre in 1983 ..read more
Visit website
Thanksgiving
Today in Ottawa's History
by todayinottawashistory
5M ago
3 January 1850, 15 April 1872 and 6 November 1879 Thanksgiving is celebrated in Canada on the second Monday of October. Traditionally, it is the time to give thanks to the Almighty for the year’s harvest. And, indeed, it is still so celebrated in homes and churches across the country. However, in today’s secular times, the religious aspect of the holiday has diminished. Instead, the long Thanksgiving weekend provides a wonderful opportunity for family get-togethers between the Labour Day weekend in early September and the Christmas and Boxing Day holidays in December. For many Canadians, the T ..read more
Visit website

Follow Today in Ottawa's History on Feedspot for daily/weekly email updates.

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR