How Not To Run Out of Money In Retirement. By Ashley Owen.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
1w ago
Today’s story looks at two key factors that determine the answers to the big questions when planning retirement finances: ‘How much do I need?’, and ‘How much can I afford to spend?’ - in order to have confidence that you can maintain your living standards, not run out of money, and not have to rely on welfare. These two factors are: your current age, and your likely life span. In particular, we highlight the four big problems when relying on ‘life expectancy’ tables that are used throughout the financial advice and retirement industry. The bottom line: be prepared for the real possibility of ..read more
Visit website
Ben Carlson on self awareness and not meeting your heroes. By Larissa Fernand.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
2w ago
I find that you rely heavily on historical data. Data is very objective and unemotional. How do you cross this line when you as an investor, bring your biases and emotions to the table? I do like to look at history because it gives you a good range and idea of the outcomes that are possible. I think it's impossible to predict what the terms are going to be in the future. But looking at past data can let you know what the risks are going to be, and the fact that everything is cyclical. It's helpful from that perspective. Warren Buffett has this quote, where he said that if past history was all ..read more
Visit website
Work Out What’s Important in Life. By Robin Powell.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
3w ago
Investing is a means to an end, not an end in itself. You need to know what you’re investing for and what you want to achieve. That’s why we strongly recommend that investors have a financial plan and, preferably, work with a professional financial planner. This is the first in a new series of occasional articles explaining how the planning process works. The article focuses on the importance of working out what we want from life and how we really want to spend our money.  It’s written by Jonathan Clements, a fellow journalist and financial educator whose work I have admired for several y ..read more
Visit website
Is the trend your friend? By Robin Powell.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
1M ago
Look in an investment magazine or the money section of a weekend newspaper, and you'll see plenty of suggestions for things to invest in.  The ideas are often based on trends or themes that appear to be gathering momentum. It might, for instance, be plant-based meat alternatives or driverless cars, and the reasons for investing always seem so plausible.  Other investment ideas are billed as diversifiers, with risks that aren’t correlated with those of equities, but which offer the potential for higher returns than cash or bonds.  But it’s vitally important, when you read article ..read more
Visit website
A lesson for investors from astronomy. By Robin Powell.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
1M ago
He's now regarded as one of the most influential mathematicians of all time, but it was his interest in astronomy that inspired Pierre-Simon Laplace to produce his most famous work. Laplace was fascinated by the movements of planets and stars. He initially shared the scientific consensus at the time that celestial mechanics could be described deterministically. That view was based on the work of Isaac Newton, which suggested that, given the required information, it was possible to predict the future positions of celestial bodies with accuracy. But Laplace gradually changed his mind. Uncertaint ..read more
Visit website
Every Quarter Counts
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
1M ago
From the IMF cutting global growth forecasts to central banks withdrawing stimulus to eye-popping inflation figures and the emergence of a new virulent strain of the coronavirus, the December quarter provided plenty of worrying headlines. Yet investors with diversified exposure to global equity markets still experienced solid returns in that period. Global developed markets delivered a return for the three months of just over 7% in AUD terms and nearly 30% over the year. The Australian market posted a quarterly return of just over 2%, bringing its full year return to more than 17%. The New Zea ..read more
Visit website
Learn to embrace the uncertainty. By TEBI.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
2M ago
Human beings dislike uncertainty. It’s an adaptive trait that has helped us to navigate complex environments, make safer choices, and foster social bonds, all of which have contributed to our species’ survival and success. But this dislike of uncertainty can be unhelpful in certain areas of life, and particularly in investing. As DAVID BOOTH, co-founder of Index Fund advisors explains, investors would be better off, financially and emotionally, if they could learn to embrace uncertainty instead of seeing it as a constant threat. “A wave of new scientific discoveries reveals that learning to l ..read more
Visit website
Quick fixes in investing, as in dieting, rarely work. By Robin Powell.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
2M ago
Humans beings like taking shortcuts. We look for quick fixes and easy solutions, whether it’s the latest fad diet or a new cryptocurrency we’re told will make us rich. Although, almost invariably, the results are disappointing, we keep on making the same costly mistake, because that’s the way our brains have evolved. Is there anything we can do about it?   Most of us have been on a health drive at some stage, and the universal experience is that they’re very hard to maintain. We start with the best intentions to exercise more or eat a healthier diet, but, within a few weeks, or even days ..read more
Visit website
Investors have never had it so good (or so tough). By Joe Wiggins.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
2M ago
“It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness…” - Charles Dickens, A Tale of two Cities   These are strange times we are living in. We have technology and resources at our disposal and enjoy a level of wealth today that our ancestors could only have marvelled at. And yet we seem to be facing ever more problems, whether it’s inflation, climate change, political divisions or international tensions. It’s a good time to be alive on so many levels, and a bad time on others. A similar dichotomy exists in the world of investing. I ..read more
Visit website
The Psychology of Inflation. By Ben Carlson.
The Private Office Blog
by Olivia Peterson
2M ago
A reader asks: I get all the stuff Ben has been saying about inflation — wages have kept pace, economic growth has been higher than the 2010s, wages have risen the most for lower income people, etc. I get all that. My husband and I own a house and own stocks so we’ve benefitted in recent years. Having said all of that, I STILL CAN’T GET OVER HOW HIGH PRICES ARE!!! The grocery store, home/auto insurance, restaurants, babysitters for the kids…everything is more expensive. So how do I get over the sticker shock? Will it just fade eventually as we get used to higher prices? The psychological com ..read more
Visit website

Follow The Private Office Blog on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR