Top 6 Mountain Marvels of Alberta
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
5d ago
By Holly Hastings A symphony of species defying the odds exists in the airy domain of Alberta’s Rocky Mountains. Let’s countdown four extraordinary species that survive despite the odds in this ruthless habitat. Can you guess which animal is #1? #6 Gray-crowned Rosy Finch Grey-crowned rosy finch, Photo by basarov, CC BY-NC 4.0 This pink and brown songbird is the highest altitude breeding bird in North America!1 These little birds breed around 1,000 to 2,500 meters2 above sea level in the Rockies as well as other mountains like the Brooks Range, the Cascades, the Sierra Nevada, and Alaska ..read more
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WHITE-TAILED JACKRABBITS: NATURE’S MASTER SURVIVORS
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
By Katie Grant White-tailed jackrabbits are true hares, not rabbits, and are naturally solitary beings. Living singly or in pairs, they exhibit a distinctive behaviour of molting in the autumn, turning white in northern populations. They are similar in size and form to rabbits but generally have longer ears. Equipped with excellent eyesight, sensitive whiskers, and extraordinary hearing, white-tailed jackrabbits are masters of evasion. If detected, they bound away at an impressive speed, often in a zigzag pattern, reaching up to 55 kilometers per hour, and they are capable of leaping up to ..read more
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Let’s Talk About bird tongues, AGAIN!
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
By Jennea Frischke After writing “Let’s Talk About Bird Tongues”, I’ve been so curious about other bird tongues. I covered three types of woodpecker tongues in that article (read here https://www.aiwc.ca/blog/lets-talk-about-bird-tongues/). During my research, I learned that depending on what a bird eats and their habitat bird tongues have evolved and adapted into different shapes, sizes, and functions, and I can’t help but wonder:  What are they hiding in that beak?  And what special tricks does it do?  I’m intrigued and must know. This time I will focus on three birds I see ..read more
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Dancing on Water: The Unique World of Grebes
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
By Marissa Hansen In the vast wetlands and serene lakes of Alberta, a peculiar group of waterbirds glides gracefully, capturing the attention of birdwatchers and nature enthusiasts alike. These grebes are fascinating creatures distinguished by their distinctive features and behaviors that set them apart from other avian species in the region. Distinctive Features: Feet, Bill, and Beyond Red-necked grebette showing lobed toes in care at the AIWC (2022). Grebes, belonging to the family Podicipedidae, possess an array of features that distinguish them from other water birds.1 Perhaps the m ..read more
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Leave it to Beavers!
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
By Carley Goodreau Busy as a beaver! These famously industrious creatures can be found building dams in ponds and on the Canadian nickel. Beavers cut trees with their teeth, spend time both in and out of the water, and build dams to create ponds they can live in. Beavers are the second largest rodent in the world, and weigh in at 16 to 29 kilograms (35 to 65 pounds).1 Easily recognizable by their long, orange, front teeth and flat, broad tail,2 “nature’s engineer”3 lead fascinating social lives. Beaver patient in care at AIWC (2022). Colonies, Lodges, and Family Structure Beaver families tha ..read more
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Amphibian Multiplication: The Reproduction of Alberta’s Frogs, Toads and Salamanders
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
by Sydney Nelson Do you remember learning about the lifecycle of a frog during your earliest science lessons or library visits? You can probably recall a circular diagram showing translucent eggs developing into fish-like aquatic creatures. The creatures were tadpoles that grew legs and gradually became fully formed frogs. Maybe you remember the frog in the diagram showing off its long, hopping legs or sticking its tongue out to catch a fly. The metamorphosis of frogs, toads and salamanders has charmed us for generations. As we look forward to spring, we can also look forward to amphibians ..read more
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Creating a Wildlife Haven: Tips for a Wildlife-Friendly Garden
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
by Chelsea Blyth Within Alberta’s landscapes, residents have an opportunity to cultivate thriving ecosystems right in their own backyard. By making conscious choices in garden design and plant selection, individuals can transform their outdoor spaces into havens for local wildlife. In this article, we’ll explore several strategies tailored to Alberta’s unique environment, aimed at making your garden a welcoming sanctuary for birds, bees, butterflies, and other precious wildlife. Native Plants One of the most effective ways to attract wildlife to your garden is by incorporating native plant ..read more
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Owl Eyes: Nature’s Night Vision Goggles
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
by Holly Hastings In the mystical realm of night, where shadows dance and humans sleep, there exists an animal with eyes that pierce through the darkest abysses. Imagine a world where sight is an art form and vision is a symphony of precision. Let us go on an enchanting journey to understand the nocturnal magic in owls’ eyes.  An owl’s diet consists mainly of mice, voles, and other rodents, often active at night.1 Therefore, most owls are nocturnal, and night is where the hunt begins.2Not only are owls’ eyes specialized for darkness, but they also have other evolutionary characteristic ..read more
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Swallows in Alberta
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
by Marissa Hansen Alberta is home to a diverse array of wildlife. Among the many avian residents of this province, swallows stand out as fascinating and important species. These various bird species inhabit different environments across the province and have unique nesting habits. With factors such as climate change and habitat loss, many swallow species have seen a decline in population. It is important to understand swallows and their differences when creating conservation strategies. Swallow Species of Alberta: Tree Swallow Tachycineta bicolor Wild tree swallow. Photo by Vicki Hale. T ..read more
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Let’s Talk About bird tongues, AGAIN!
Alberta Institute For Wildlife Conservation Blog
by AIWC Volunteer
1M ago
Add Your Heading Text Here After writing “Let’s Talk About Bird Tongues”, I’ve been so curious about other bird tongues. I covered three types of woodpecker tongues in that article (read here https://www.aiwc.ca/blog/lets-talk-about-bird-tongues/). During my research, I learned that depending on what a bird eats and their habitat bird tongues have evolved and adapted into different shapes, sizes, and functions, and I can’t help but wonder:  What are they hiding in that beak?  And what special tricks does it do?  I’m intrigued and must know. This time I will focus on three bir ..read more
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