Becoming Water Literate
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
2w ago
With cave diver and climate advocate Jill Heinerth. Climate change affects us all. But women, girls, and gender-diverse people often experience harsher impacts of climate change, especially those who are most marginalized. They’re also an important part of effective climate solutions. Gender equality itself is a climate crisis solution.  Anishinabek Nation Chief Water Commissioner Autumn Peltier says, “I advocate for water because we all came from water and water is literally the only reason we are here today and living on this earth.”  The United Nations says, “from unpred ..read more
Visit website
The Model Minority Myth
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
1M ago
With Prachi Gupta, author of They Called Us Exceptional: And Other Lies that Raised Us. The Canadian Encyclopedia says the model minority is a stereotype that “depicts Asians as hard working, successful at school and in the workplace, and as economically prosperous.”   It may seem like a positive stereotype. But it divides non-model and model racialized communities, ignores vast disparities in wealth and well-being faced by pan-Asian people, and trivializes the impacts of racism.  That the model minority stereotype is racist is no question. But how does it impact people differen ..read more
Visit website
Talking Gender and Climate Change
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
1M ago
With Katie Harper at Project Neutral. I’ve heard people say, “climate disaster knows no bounds”. There’s a sense in which that’s true. But impacts of climate change affect different people in Canada and around the world differently, depending on who they are.   Women, girls, and gender-diverse people often experience harsher impacts of climate change, especially if they are marginalized due to racism, poverty, and other factors. They’re also an important part of effective climate solutions. Gender equality itself is a climate crisis solution.  Guest Katie Harper is Senior Advisor at ..read more
Visit website
The Walrus Talks Gender-Based Violence (Part 2)
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
2M ago
With Jake Stika of Next Gen Men, Fay Slift and Fluffy Soufflé of The Fabulous Show with Fay and Fluffy, Shree Paradkar of the Toronto Star, and Angela Sterritt, national bestselling author of Unbroken. Today’s episode features four of seven incredible speakers at The Walrus Talks Gender-Based Violence, presented by the Canadian Women’s Foundation and held on November 16, 2023. Speakers addressed pressing issues and solutions to end gender-based violence. Listen to learn how we can become allies to survivors of abuse and work as agents of safety and care from the ground up.  ..read more
Visit website
The Walrus Talks Gender-Based Violence (Part 1)
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
3M ago
With Paulette Senior and Anuradha Dugal of the Canadian Women’s Foundation and Pamela Cross at Luke’s Place. Today’s episode features three of seven incredible speakers at The Walrus Talks Gender-Based Violence, presented by the Canadian Women’s Foundation and held on November 16, 2023. Speakers addressed pressing issues and solutions to end gender-based violence.  Listen to learn how we can become allies to survivors of abuse and work as agents of safety and care from the ground up.  A note about content: this episode addresses gender-based violence.  Relevant links: The F ..read more
Visit website
Being Young and Facing Gendered Digital Abuse
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
3M ago
With Amanda Arella at YWCA Canada. Those who are young face elevated risks of gendered digital harm. Statistics Canada found that, among those aged 18 to 29 years, young women were more often the target of online abuse, with a prevalence almost double the rate of young men. The gender difference was especially pronounced for receiving unwanted sexually suggestive or explicit material, where young women were almost three times as likely to be targeted as young men.  YWCA Canada found that 44% of women and gender-diverse people aged 16 to 30 report having been personally targeted by ha ..read more
Visit website
Taking Action on Online Hate
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
3M ago
With Leigh Naturkach at the Mosaic Institute. We’re still not doing enough to end gendered digital hate, harassment, and abuse on a large scale. Perhaps that can give us the impression that the public doesn’t care or we’re all too complacent to do anything about it.  The numbers tell us otherwise. In 2023, the Canadian Women’s Foundation found that 88% of people in Canada believe we need to make changes so online spaces are safer for everyone. Fifty-eight per cent of women in particular strongly agree with this idea. Likewise, 88% of people in Canada believe social media companies have a ..read more
Visit website
Technology-Facilitated Gender-Based Violence
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
4M ago
With Rhiannon Wong at Women’s Shelters Canada. The Tech Safety Canada website says technology-facilitated gender-based violence “happens when someone uses technology to harm or control you.” It can take the form of “harassing text or social media messages, restricting access to technology, non-consensually sharing intimate images, using location-tracking technology, or threatening to do any of these.” The scope of this abuse is big because the scope of gender-based violence in Canada is big. Statistics Canada says that sixty-seven per cent of those who report online intimidation to police are ..read more
Visit website
Rising Extremism and Gendered Digital Abuse
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
4M ago
With Barbara Perry, Professor in the Faculty of Social Science and Humanities at Ontario Tech University, and Director of the Centre on Hate, Bias and Extremism at Ontario Tech University. A recent House of Commons report speaks to the rise of ideologically motivated violent extremism in Canada, based on xenophobic, gender-driven, anti-authority, and other personal grievance-driven ideas and ideologies. The report says that, in the age of social media, it can “elude the terminology and analytical frameworks long used by our law enforcement and national security agencies”, and these “longstandi ..read more
Visit website
Digital Creator Alicia Mccarvell (@aliciamccarvell)
Alright, Now What?
by Canadian Women's Foundation
4M ago
With Alicia Mccarvell, creator and social media influencer (@aliciamccarvell). There’s a lot of research on how social media can impact users and expose them to harmful content. But those with a prominent online presence experience more digital harassment themselves - politicians, academics, journalists, and professional content creators and highly-followed influencers. Creators and influencers can be subject to repeated insults and derogatory and humiliating comments on a daily basis. Women influencers report more severe consequences, such as going into a state of shock and facing economic lo ..read more
Visit website

Follow Alright, Now What? on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR