Group tied to Kent Thiry drops $1.1 million into Colorado legislative primaries in final days before election
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Sandra Fish and Jesse Paul
14h ago
A group tied to Kent Thiry, the wealthy former CEO of the Denver-based dialysis giant DaVita, is spending nearly $1.1 million on TV and digital ads in 13 state legislative races in the days leading up to Colorado’s primaries on Tuesday.  The money supports more moderate Democratic and Republican candidates in their races against their more liberal or conservative opponents.  Let Colorado Vote Action, a state-level super PAC, was created Monday and spent the money Wednesday on ads that were to begin Thursday. The committee reported the spending Friday night, meeting a 48-hour campai ..read more
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Colorado GOP spent $20,000 supporting Chairman Dave Williams’ congressional campaign in May, report shows
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Sandra Fish
1d ago
The Colorado GOP spent nearly $20,000 in late May to help party Chairman Dave Williams in his 5th District Congressional campaign. That represented the largest single expense of the nearly $90,000 the party spent last month, according to a Federal Election Commission filing late Thursday. The party raised about $56,000 in May and began June with about $550,000 in the bank. Williams has faced intense criticism for using party resources to benefit his congressional bid as he faces conservative commentator and activist Jeff Crank in the 5th District Republican primary June 25. Earlier this week ..read more
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Colorado ends budget year $164M in the red with potential tax cuts looming on November ballot
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Brian Eason
2d ago
The state of Colorado will end its budget year June 30 with a deficit of as much as $164 million, forcing it to dip into its reserves as it heads into an election cycle fraught with financial uncertainty. And the budget picture only deteriorates from there, according to revenue forecasts provided to the Joint Budget Committee on Thursday. Next fiscal year, which starts July 1, the state will start in a $35 million to $86 million hole that budget writers would have to close during midyear budget adjustments, which take place each year in January. That leaves little wriggle room if something u ..read more
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Expensive battle over direction of policy at the Colorado Capitol plays out in Democratic legislative primaries
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Brian Eason and Jesse Paul
2d ago
Democratic legislative primaries this year across the Front Range have become an extraordinarily expensive — and at times mean-spirited — battle over the direction of policy at the Colorado Capitol. The stakes are significant.  The makeup of the historic Democratic majorities at the statehouse will determine the future of laws on housing, environmental regulations, taxes, and worker and consumer protections — policy areas where bills have lived or died based on the votes of a single Democratic lawmaker on a key committee. While each of the contested Democratic legislative primaries have ..read more
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Expensive battle over direction of policy at the Colorado Capitol plays out in Democratic legislative primaries
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Brian Eason and Jesse Paul
3d ago
Democratic legislative primaries this year across the Front Range have become an extraordinarily expensive — and at times mean-spirited — battle over the direction of policy at the Colorado Capitol. The stakes are significant.  The makeup of the historic Democratic majorities at the statehouse will determine the future of laws on housing, environmental regulations, taxes, and worker and consumer protections — policy areas where bills have lived or died based on the votes of a single Democratic lawmaker on a key committee. While each of the contested Democratic legislative primaries have ..read more
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Elisabeth Epps, Tim Hernández — two of the Colorado legislature’s most liberal lawmakers — battle to keep their jobs
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Brian Eason and Jesse Paul
3d ago
Two of the Colorado legislature’s most liberal lawmakers — Denver Democratic Reps. Elisabeth Epps and Tim Hernández — are battling in the June 25 primary to keep their jobs at the Capitol.  Epps faces attorney and Air Force veteran Sean Camacho in the Democratic primary in House District 6, while Hernández faces former federal immigration judge Cecelia Espenoza in the Democratic primary in House District 4. Here’s a look at where the candidates stand on the issues, and the groups spending money to influence voters in each race.  Elisabeth Epps vs. Sean Camacho Epps, a lawyer by tra ..read more
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A new Colorado law will assess the harms of slavery and racism. But only if supporters raise almost $800K on their own.
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Tatiana Flowers
4d ago
A bill creating the Black Coloradan Racial Equity Commission was signed into law June 4. But supporters must raise $785,000 to prove there is strong community support for what the law directs History Colorado to do — assess and quantify the financial impact of slavery, racism and discrimination on Black Coloradans and make recommendations for corrective measures. The group is about $30,000 short of reaching that goal by July 1. “This is not us using public dollars for something other folks didn’t think we needed a study on,” said State Sen. James Coleman, a Democrat and lead sponsor of the la ..read more
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Democrat Adam Frisch is running TV ads in 3rd Congressional District GOP primary to boost his chances in November
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Jesse Paul
4d ago
Democrat Adam Frisch is spending at least $100,000 to air a TV ad in the Republican primary in Colorado’s 3rd Congressional District in an apparent attempt to shape the race and give himself a better chance to win in November.  The ad attacks Grand Junction attorney Jeff Hurd for “ducking Republican debates” and for refusing to say who he voted for in the 2016 and 2020 presidential elections, as well as for being the beneficiary of corporate super PAC money.  It’s a clear call to GOP primary voters in the Republican-leaning 3rd District to back a different candidate in the six-way ..read more
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Southeastern Coloradans could pay $20 more a month if state regulators approve utility’s rate increase
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Mark Jaffe
5d ago
Black Hills Energy, which serves about 100,000 customers in a slice of southeastern Colorado, is seeking a $36.7 million rate hike, which would increase the average residential bill by about $20 a month. Rapid City, South Dakota-based Black Hills told the Colorado Public Utilities Commission it was seeking its first rate increase in eight years mainly to recoup $370 million in infrastructure investments. The rate request comes after Black Hills added a $1.50 surcharge, or rider, to bills in March to pay for its Clean Energy Plan, which will add 400 megawatts of renewable energy resources. The ..read more
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Mountain Village is the only town in Colorado that lets nonresidents vote. Now it’s considering adding LLCs to voter rolls.
The Colorado Sun – Politics and Government
by Jason Blevins
5d ago
When the town of Mountain Village above Telluride incorporated in 1995, emerging from a special district, the town charter allowed nonresident property owners to vote. Mountain Village is still the only town in Colorado that allows nonresidents to vote in local elections for council members, mayors and new regulations.  Now the town board is considering amending Mountain Village’s charter to expand voting to owners of LLCs and trusts that own property in the tony resort municipality.  “This is something that no other community has done,” Mountain Village Mayor Marti Prohaska said a ..read more
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