Many states don’t educate people sentenced to life. Now some are coming home.
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Charlotte West, OpenCampus
2d ago
When Yusef Qualls-El was 17, a judge sentenced him to life behind bars. It was the mid-1990s, an era when the U.S. prison population exploded. Thousands of minors like Qualls-El received sentences of life without parole and entered prison at an age when their peers were going to college or starting their careers. But inside, education is often reserved for those who will soon return to society. As a result, those who were seen as the least likely to get out had the fewest opportunities. Now, as courts and lawmakers have begun to rethink extreme sentencing policies for young people, thousands o ..read more
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Breaking walls, building bridges: A call for restorative justice in school discipline
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Jully Myrthil, The Hechinger Report
4d ago
This story was originally produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news outlet focused on education. Imagine waking up each morning with no hope for the day ahead, navigating a minefield of potential conflicts with your body on high alert. That was my reality as a marginalized youth — misunderstood, labeled as a troublemaker and cast out without a chance to reconcile and evolve. Growing up with anxiety in school is an all-too-common experience that perpetuates a cycle of fear and resentment. It’s time to acknowledge and address this narrative that adversely affects ..read more
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Report: America’s growing movement to divert youth out of the justice system
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Nickolas Bagley
2w ago
Source The Sentencing Project Summary "After decades of neglect, the youth justice field is awakening to the importance of diversion in lieu of arrest and formal court processing for many or most youth accused of delinquent behavior. Even amid rising concerns over youth crime nationwide, jurisdictions across the country are heeding the evidence by taking concerted action to address more cases of alleged lawbreaking behavior outside the formal justice system. This momentum to make diversion a centerpiece of juvenile justice reform is encouraging given powerful research showing that youth who ar ..read more
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Tennessee lawmakers want more oversight of juvenile detention. The Department of Children’s Services is pushing back.
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Paige Pfleger, WPLN/Nashville Public Radio
3w ago
This story was originally published by ProPublica. The commissioner of the Tennessee Department of Children’s Services publicly said this month that the agency was working with lawmakers to address oversight gaps at juvenile detention facilities across the state. But behind the scenes, the department is working to water down a bill that would do just that, according to one of the bill’s sponsors and others working on the legislation. Last year, an investigation by WPLN and ProPublica revealed that the Richard L. Bean Juvenile Service Center in Knoxville was illegally locking children alone ..read more
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When police encounters with autistic people turn fatal
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Jamiles Lartey, The Marshall Project
3w ago
This article was first published by The Marshall Project, a nonprofit news organization covering the U.S. criminal justice system. Last Saturday, a San Bernardino sheriff’s deputy shot and killed Ryan Gainer, an autistic Black 15-year-old, outside his home in Apple Valley, California. The shooting, which is under investigation, came after Gainer chased the deputy with a large bladed garden tool, according to police and body camera footage released by the department. The teen’s family had called 911 when he became upset during a disagreement, broke a glass door and struck a relative. They told ..read more
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6 tips: What families need to know about how to safely store firearms at home
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Kerri Raissian, University of Connecticut and Jennifer Necci Dineen, University of Connecticut, The Conversation
1M ago
For the past few years, guns have been identified as the leading cause of death for children in the United States. There were 2,571 children age 1 to 17 who died in shootings in the U.S. in 2021, 68% more than the 1,531 that occurred in 2000. To help reduce the number of firearm-related deaths and injuries among children, Secretary of Education Miguel Cardona in January 2024 called upon school and district administrators to talk with parents and guardians about safe firearm storage practices. As experts on the safe storage of firearms – and as leaders of the University of Connecticut’s ARMS Ce ..read more
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Q&A: Texas court ruling on a Black student wearing hair in long locs reflects history of racism in schools
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Kenjus T. Watson, American University
1M ago
America’s schools don’t always welcome cultural expression: A judge ruled that a Texas school did not violate the CROWN Act by suspending Darryl George for his hairstyle. Barbers Hill ISD removed the Black 18-year-old student from regular classes Aug. 31, 2023, stating he was not complying with the dress code. The Texas CROWN Act, which prohibits race-based hair discrimination, went into effect just one day later. A Texas judge ruled (video below) on Feb. 22, 2024, that the Barbers Hill School District didn’t violate the law when it punished Darryl George, a Black student, for wearing his ha ..read more
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Schools are sending more kids to psychiatrists out of fears of campus violence, prompting concern from clinicians
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Meredith Kolodner and Annie Ma, Hechinger Report
1M ago
This story was produced by The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news outlet focused on education. The 9-year-old had been drawing images of guns at school and pretending to point the weapons at other students. He’d become more withdrawn, and had stared angrily at a teacher. The principal suspended him for a week. Educators were unsure whether it was safe for him to return to school — and, if so, how best to support him. “None of us can predict violence.” Nancy Rappaport, psychiatrist So, as schools around the country are increasingly inclined to do amid hei ..read more
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Active shooter training: State-specific requirements for schools and law enforcement
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Lexi Churchill and Lomi Kriel, The Texas Tribune and ProPublica
2M ago
After a teenage gunman killed 10 people at Santa Fe High School in 2018, Texas lawmakers mandated that all school police officers receive training to better prepare them for the possibility of confronting a mass shooter. The law, which required that such training occur only once, didn’t apply to thousands of state and local law enforcement officers who did not work in schools. Four years later, officers who descended on Uvalde’s Robb Elementary School, a vast majority of whom were not school police, repeatedly acted in ways that ran contrary to what active shooter training teaches, waiting 77 ..read more
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A history of holding parents responsible for their kids’ crimes
Juvenile Justice Information Exchange
by Mark Keierleber, The 74
2M ago
Just three days before her 15-year-old son carried out a mass shooting at his Michigan high school in 2021, Jennifer Crumbley was captured on security camera leaving a shooting range with the handgun in tow. She had just taken her son out to target practice in what she described on social media as a “mom and son day testing out his new Christmas present:” a 9-millimeter pistol the high schooler referred to online as “My new beauty.” The images were pivotal to an unprecedented conviction this week that legal scholars predict could create a new tool for prosecutors as the nation looks for ways t ..read more
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