No, getting your boyfriend to peel an orange won’t prove his loyalty. Why TikTok relationship ‘tests’ are useless
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Edith Jennifer Hill, Associate Lecturer, Learning & Teaching Innovation, Flinders University, Lydia Woodyatt, Professor of Psychology, Flinders University
3M ago
Shutterstock Have you ever wondered if your partner really loves you? Well apparently so have thousands of TikTok users, who are testing their theories for the world to see. In the past year we’ve seen a rise in TikTok trends that purport to “test” a partner’s loyalty or the strength of a couple’s relationship. These tests vary in severity, from telling your partner you saw a cool bird and hoping they respond with equal enthusiasm, to asking an influencer to flirt with them to see if they’ll cheat. If this sound stressful or potentially problematic to you, that’s because it is. What are thes ..read more
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Happy wife, happy life? A harmonious relationship is the responsibility of both partners
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Cheryl Harasymchuk, Professor, Psychology, Carleton University
1y ago
Women are often considered the barometers of a relationship. (Shutterstock) Relationships play a key role in people’s happiness. There are scholars who study how people maintain good quality relationships and the challenges they face. Some challenges are beyond people’s control, including financial, familial and health stressors — however, there are things people can control to make their relationships stronger. For instance, people can avoid escalating conflict, criticizing a partner or acting too jealous. They can also do positive things in the relationship in the form of gratitude, laughter ..read more
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Partnering up can help you grow as an individual – here's the psychology of a romantic relationship that expands the self
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University
2y ago
Following a partner's lead in an activity they enjoy can foster growth for you. The Good Brigade/DigitalVision via Getty Images It’s common to want to become a better version of yourself. Much like the desires to eat, drink and avoid harm, human beings also experience a fundamental need to learn, grow and improve – what psychologists call self-expansion. Consider your favorite activities. Things like reading a book, spending time in nature, volunteering with a new organization, taking a class, traveling, trying a new restaurant, exercising or watching a documentary all broaden the self. Those ..read more
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Should I stay or should I go? Here are the relationship factors people ponder when deciding whether to break up
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University
3y ago
Are you feeling more 'soul mate' or 'k bye' about your relationship? Christine_Kohler/iStock via Getty Images Plus Where do you see yourself in five years? It’s a standard job interview question, but it’s an even better question to ask yourself about your relationship. The person you talk to, date, move in with, get engaged to, marry, break up with or divorce – it’s all up to you. You’re in the driver’s seat regarding your relationship’s trajectory. Most of the time, you probably cruise along on autopilot, maintaining the status quo. Every once in a while, though, something disrupts that equil ..read more
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7 research-based resolutions that will help strengthen your relationship in the year ahead
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University
3y ago
Consider some science-backed ways to keep the home fires burning in 2021. Gabriele Grzelewski/iStock via Getty Images Plus The new year is going to be better. It has to be better. Maybe you’re one of the 74% of Americans in one survey who said they planned on hitting the reset button on Jan. 1 and resolving to improve. Those New Year’s resolutions most commonly focus on eating healthier, exercising, losing weight and being a better person. Admirable goals, to be sure. But focusing on body and mind neglects something equally important: your romantic relationship. Couples with better marriages r ..read more
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Love lockdown: the pandemic has put pressure on many relationships, but here's how to tell if yours will survive
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gery Karantzas, Associate professor in Social Psychology / Relationship Science, Deakin University
3y ago
Soroush Karimi/Unsplash Life in lockdown has been tough on many relationships. But negotiating the transition back to “normal” as restrictions continue to lift could also be a challenge for couples. So what are some of the key factors that affect how relationships fare during such times? To answer this, I’m going to draw on an important model in relationship science called the vulnerability stress adaptation model. Read more: The coronavirus lockdown could test your relationship. Here's how to keep it intact (and even improve it) 3 important factors As its name suggests, the model proposes th ..read more
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Married at First Sight - a 'social experiment' all but guaranteeing relationship failure
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gery Karantzas, Associate professor in Social Psychology / Relationship Science, Deakin University
3y ago
Married at First Sight's many failed relationships are not a surprise, given the way the show is made. 9Now Despite its obvious appeal, the Nine Network’s reality TV show Married at First Sight is based on a false premise. This “social experiment” is built on the notion that individuals looking for love are matched by experts, increasing the probability of a lasting and satisfying union. However, it is entirely apparent that the show all but guarantees relationship failure. From the first five seasons, it seems that only one couple has stayed together. Many would say this is due to the way the ..read more
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Think you love your Valentine? What's beneath the surface may be more complicated
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Vivian Zayas, Associate Professor of Psychology, Cornell University, Yuichi Shoda, Professor of Psychology, University of Washington
3y ago
Real love has more nuance than a candy heart's message. Laura Ockel/Unsplash, CC BY Valentine cards are filled with expressions of unequivocal adoration and appreciation. That’s fitting for the holiday set aside to express love and reaffirm commitment to one’s romantic partner. But what if there’s more going on below the surface of these adoring declarations? How might thoughts and feelings that people are not even aware of shape their romantic relationships? We are two psychology researchers interested in how the mind works, and how it affects a variety of experiences, including romantic rela ..read more
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15 questions to determine if your relationship is Hall of Fame material or a strikeout
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University
3y ago
Relationship science can weigh in on whether you're with a winner. Evgeniia Trushkova/Shutterstock.com Decisions are a part of life. At various times you may need to choose the best vacation spot, job candidate, babysitter, or place to live. Your most important decision may be figuring out your best romantic partner. Relationships matter – a lot. They have implications for your health, your reactions to stress and even how you look at the world. But how can you determine if your current romantic partner is the best of the best for you? It’s hard to know what factors truly matter, what you shou ..read more
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Why you should date your best friend
The Conversation » Relationship Science
by Gary W. Lewandowski Jr., Chair and Professor of Psychology, Monmouth University
3y ago
Bestie + Lover = Relationship Nirvana? Aspa, CC BY One person fills two roles. Being someone’s BFF is a big deal – you don’t hand over the other half of your “Best Friends” necklace to just anyone. Having a romantic partner who is also your best friend potentially sounds perfect. With your BFF as your romantic partner, you get the best of both worlds, someone with whom you can laugh, share your life and cuddle. When you look at seemingly happy celebrity couples like Ashton Kutcher and Mila Kunis, or Leslie Mann and Judd Apatow, not only do they appear to be in love, but they also seem to genui ..read more
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