June 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
2w ago
Welcome back to June's Papers of the month! We kick off this month looking at the work up of patients with a first episode of psychosis. With these patients there is a chance of a psychosis secondary to an underlying structural cause. Getting neuro-imaging to look for this prior to psychiatric assessment is tricky though, often with a need for sedation and then the subsequent delay for psychiatric assessment. Our first paper looks at the yield of positive scans for these patients and helps us to understand a bit more about the need for this. Secondly; sepsis screening tools are commonplace in ..read more
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May 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
1M ago
Welcome back to the podcast and three great papers for May's episode! First up we take a pretty deep look into refractory VF. This follows on from our our review of DOSE-VF in December '22's papers of the month and our recent Roadside to Resus on the topic. In that we discussed the possibility that many of the cases we see at pulse checks as being refractory VF may actually have had 5 seconds or more, post shock, where they jumped out of VF but then reverted back into it. This paper is a secondary analysis of DOSE-VF and reveals what really happen to these 'refractory VFs' by interrogating the ..read more
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April 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
2M ago
Welcome back to the podcast! Three more papers covering topics that are relevant to all of our practice. The importance of removing wet clothes from patients is often discussed, both to prevent hypothermia and increase patient comfort. But how important is it to get wet clothes off and is it something we can defer to a different point? We start off taking a look at an RCT on this very question. Next up another RCT, this time looking at the efficacy of morphine, ibuprofen and paracetamol for patients with closed limb injuries. Which one, or combination, would you think would be most efficacious ..read more
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End Tidal CO2; Roadside to Resus
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
3M ago
End Tidal CO2, or ETCO2 for short, is something that’s talked about pretty often in Emergency and Critical Care and that’s because it’s used a lot in the assessment and treatment of patients! It’s got a big part to play in airway management, resuscitation, sedation and is also increasingly used in other situations. Some of these applications have some pretty strong evidence to back them up but others are definitely worth a deeper thought, because without a sound understanding of ETCO2 we can fall foul of some traps… ETCO2 is a non-invasive measurement of the partial pressure of CO2 in expired ..read more
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March 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
3M ago
Welcome back to the podcast, a new month, three more papers and discussion around the topics. We kick off with a paper comparing mechanical ventilation in CPR compared to the more traditional hand ventilation; what difference does the machine make to ventilation in arrest and should we be changing to this strategy as a standard? We've talked about aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage a fair amount on the podcast and the second paper looks at the effectiveness of lumbar CSF drain compared to standard care with some pretty staggering results! Lastly we take a look at a paper exploring decision ma ..read more
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Refractory VF; Roadside to Resus
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
4M ago
As we all know, rapid and effective resuscitation makes a huge difference to the chance of survival from a cardiac arrest. If you’re going to pick a rhythm to have as the patient or as the Resuscitationist, then it’s going to be a shockable rhythm, so VF or pulseless VT as they hold the greatest chance of survival. You'll find an initial shockable rhythm in around 20% of cases & defibrillation alone may lead to a ROSC. So it’s absolutely imperative to get the immediate management spot on! Whilst current practice is good, there are some aspects of care that we can improve on and make a real ..read more
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February 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
4M ago
Welcome back to February's papers of the month. Syncope is a really common presentation to the Emergency Department and it can be complicated to tease out those with a concerning precipitant from the others with a more benign cause. The first paper gives us some context to the management of these undifferentiated syncopes and provides a barometer for how stringently ESC guidance on the topic is followed. Next up we take a look a huge RCT of transfusion thresholds in patients presenting with a myocardial infarction. Should we be restrictive in our approach, saving a valuable resource, or is it ..read more
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Paediatric Fever; Roadside to Resus
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
5M ago
Fever is an incredibly effective mechanism to fight off pathogens. Clearly, whilst many illnesses that cause a fever don’t require anything more than the body’s natural response, there are some patients in which a fever might represent a serious illness. Differentiating those serious illnesses from self-limiting presentations can be tricky at times, but can also be anxiety provoking for clinicians and parents, or carers of that child.  In children the limited communication can make the diagnostic challenge of the origin of the fever a real challenge, along with the added difficult of gain ..read more
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January 2024; papers of the month
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
6M ago
Happy New Year! We've got some great topic and in person events lined up for 2024 which we'll be able to share some more details about with you soon. This month we look at an RCT of conservative airway management in patients with a low GCS following presentation with acute poisoning. Next up we take a look at paper reviewing our diagnostic ability with dissociative seizures; this gives us some really valuable signs and symptoms to looks for and outlines how we can improve with these presentations. Lastly we look at prognostic scores following out of hospital cardiac arrests with a study that c ..read more
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Caring in a Broken System; Roadside to Resus
The Resus Room
by Simon Laing, Rob Fenwick & James Yates
6M ago
We know it's the festive season but we thought we’d try and cover an issue from which there appears to be no escape and is a particular problem at this time of year, queuing! Whether we like it or not, this has become a factor for all of us working in emergency care, whether its delays getting your patient into the department, queueing down the corridor into ED, a prolonged stay in ED for an appropriate ward, or even in a physical queue to get out of the ED and onto an appropriate bed! We are looking after our patients for significantly longer than we’re used to and this pushes the patient and ..read more
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