Rhapsody in Tulip
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
1M ago
Rhapsody in Tulip is my last 2023 image in the Artfully Random series. As I look back, this image speaks to me with its sense of color and rhythm: a paean to the wonders to be found in so many flowers and gardens. Rhapsody in Tulip © Harold Davis Note that the red and purple tulips are resting on a bed of peonies that are partially dried. So one could think of this image as a paean to peonies, or at least peonies as a foil to tulips!   ..read more
Visit website
Rose Curves Ahead
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
1M ago
A bouquet of luscious white roses came home one day. The interior curves of these roses attracted me with their grace and serenity, and I decided to photograph them close-up to create monochromatic abstractions. The first image (above) is at about 1.5:1, so substantially larger than life. Going in closer, I photographed the second image at twice life size (2:1). Rose Study #42 © Harold DavisRose Curves © Harold Davis Some related images: Lost in the Folds of a Rose; Kiss from a Rose; Rose Rose in Rose and in Black and White ..read more
Visit website
Iris Suite
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
1M ago
I have been photographing Irises close-up and personal. Irises are wonderful flowers, and I come back to them quite a bit. With these images, I used a simple setup with a light box for back lighting. In some cases, I used only the back lighting, and in others I added a small LED ring light to illuminate from the front. These images are all fairly extreme macro range, from 1:1 going as close as 2:1, or twice life size. I am thinking about creating a small portfolio of Iris images. Iris Window © Harold DavisSpectral Iris © Harold DavisPillars of Iris © Harold DavisIris Runway © Harold DavisIris ..read more
Visit website
Macro Photography: The Undiscovered Country
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
2M ago
I’ve written about looking through my viewfinder with a macro lens on the camera and navigating a new country. The topography and contours of this “country” are unknown, and it is my job to explore. It’s also my job to present a coherent slice of this jumbled terrain to present to my audience a “landscape” they haven’t seen before. Proteus I © Harold Davis After all, collaborating with one’s viewers to show something in a new way is one of the goals of photography, or, dare I say, all art. And where could this be more true than in macro work? Of course, just because something is novel, because ..read more
Visit website
Mandala
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
3M ago
Yesterday I spent most of my day building a mandala from flower petals on my light box. I used petals from alstroemeria, chrysanthemum, gerbera, some lobelia from the garden, and a few ilex berries. Putting together a composition like this requires an almost Zen level of concentration, not to mention holding one’s breath and nimble fingers. As opposed to my method in some previous compositions, I used “just-in-time” petal plucking rather than first creating a library of plucked petals. Here’s my Mandala as photographed on my light box. Mandala (White) © Harold Davis As those of you have follow ..read more
Visit website
New U.S. Postage Stamps
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
4M ago
I am proud to have five of my images reproduced in 2024 as United States postage stamps. As you can see, these are “miscellaneous” low denomination stamps, with values of one cent, two cents, three cents, five cents, and ten cents. Thanks to the USPS art director Ethel Kessler, the number of blossoms in each stamp image very cleverly matches the value of each stamp. The text of the announcement follows below. A new series of low denomination stamps will debut in 2024. Each stamp will showcase a different flower design: 1-cent fringed tulip, 2-cent daffodils, 3-cent peonies, 5-cent red tulips ..read more
Visit website
White Peonies
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
8M ago
I have been photographing some stunning white peonies. For this flower, the internal cluster is in a pretty unusual formation. Part of the idea of photographing this flower on the light box is to let the colors of the flowers I have arranged under the petals be refracted up into the image.  In a way, these two images of white peonies fit in with my Artfully Random sequence. But in this case, I think it is visually clear that the randomness has been conspicuously arranged to enhance the composition, so the randomness is clearly not entirely random. White Peony © Harold Davis Peonies and ..read more
Visit website
Artfully Random
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
9M ago
I’ve stumbled into a new series of flower images. These images have in common the appearance of “artful randomness.” They are supposed to seem casual and minimally arranged. But the fact is that I create these images from “the ground up” using both a scaffolding and an intermediate structural layer, so the appearance of randomness is just that—an appearance—and there is very little about these images that has been left to chance, whatever chance may be. In art, I like to think, there are no accidents, only serendipity. To play fast and loose and improvise, first understand and master your craf ..read more
Visit website
Glory of the Garden
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
10M ago
How wonderful to be photographing flowers from my garden at this time of year when the world comes to life and all the colors glow and are so glorious! Glory of the Garden © Harold Davis Glory of the Garden 2 © Harold Davis Glory of the Garden 3 © Harold Davis ..read more
Visit website
Rojasianthe Superba
Harold Davis » Flowers
by Harold Davis
11M ago
This Rojasianthe superba, sometimes called “White Sunflower Tree,” was growing in the entry garden of San Francisco Botanical Garden, where (with permission) I cut this specimen. The seeds of Rojasianthe were collected by a botanist on the slopes of a volcano in Guatemala, and sent to the garden to propagate. Currently, only San Francisco Botanical Garden and UC Berkeley grow this amazing specimen outside of its native habitat. San Francisco’s moist, relatively warm, and sunny climate make it ideal for growing plants that are originally from cloud forests in subtropical high-mountain ecosystem ..read more
Visit website

Follow Harold Davis » Flowers on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR