What is Ethical Investing?
Daily Philosophy
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2d ago
We all want our money to serve the right cause – but how can we make sure that it will? Catherine Greene on what is involved in ethical investing and ESG considerations. What is ethical investing? The desire to invest ethically is not new. For example, in the 18th century, Methodists in the US avoided investing in companies involved in alcohol, tobacco, or gambling. Today, retail investors can access an increasing variety of ESG funds and investments (ESG stands for Environmental, Social and Governance), which reflects the ongoing desire of many of us to do good while investing to generate a f ..read more
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Necessary Vices
Daily Philosophy
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1w ago
It is rarely denied that, in societies remotely like our own, an impressive array of vices or human failings is on display. Hypocrisy, greed, cruelty, prejudice, envy, sentimentality, dishonesty, hubris… these are just a few of them. But what if many of these vices are not simply familiar but, as it were, baked into human life as we know it? How should it affect a moral verdict on humankind if its failings are necessary to its forms of life? Responses to this question will vary. For some people, the necessity of many vices merely adds to their already bleak, pessimistic assessment of the human ..read more
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Albert Schweitzer on the Reverence for Life
Daily Philosophy
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1w ago
A history of philosophy in its most famous quotes. Today: Albert Schweitzer, medical doctor, theologian, musician and philosopher who left it all behind to go and help the poorest in Africa, saying: “Ethics is nothing other than the Reverence for Life.” In this series, we go through the most famous quotes in the history of philosophy! Subscribe here to never miss a post! Find all the articles in the series here. “Ethics is nothing other than Reverence for Life. (Albert Schweitzer, Civilisation and Ethics) ” Albert Schweitzer (1875-1965) was a medical doctor, protestant theologian, musici ..read more
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Kant’s Joke: Are Practical Jokes Wrong?
Daily Philosophy
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3w ago
Kant is an unlikely source of humour, one might suppose, given his, by all accounts, reined-in, well-regulated way of life. On the other hand, others report that he could be quite a wit and good company when out convivially eating with others. Be that as it may, the connection with Kant is not with him personally, but with that perhaps even more unlikely joke-source, the Categorical Imperative. Kant is an unlikely source of humour, one might suppose, given his, by all accounts, reined-in, well-regulated way of life.  It is not the Categorical Imperative that generates the joke, but rather ..read more
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Welcome to the German site!
Daily Philosophy
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3w ago
Are you a German speaker? If so, we now offer a subset of Daily Philosophy articles in German at the address: daily-philosophy.de Leave a comment to tell us how you like it and what we can improve. We are happy to announce that Daily Philosophy will from now on be available in German, in addition to the international, English-language site. Since these are still the early days of the German site, only a few articles have been translated, but we are working daily on more and hope, eventually, to have most articles available in German. We know that some places, like menus, dates, headers and f ..read more
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When Does a Fetus Have Rights?
Daily Philosophy
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3w ago
What sort of rights should a fetus or embryo have? This isn’t the only question in debates about abortion, but it’s an important one. The central claim of anti-abortion activists is that destroying a fetus or embryo is wrong because it’s killing a being that has a right to live. And part of the case for abortion access is the opposite claim, that a fetus or embryo is not yet a being with rights. This denial is only part of the case for abortion rights: there’s also the claim that even if a fetus or embryo has rights, the pregnant person’s right to bodily autonomy should take precedence, and th ..read more
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What does “March of the Penguins” have to do with Kant?
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
For those of us who are curious about philosophy and keep studying it, we are often part of events that put us to the test. A common scenario can be described more or less as follows. Imagine you are at a dinner table, having fun with some friends on a Saturday night, and the topic of violence in human beings is brought up. Maybe you are discussing a crime that came up in the news recently, when one of your buddies makes the following pronouncement: “Last week I watched ‘March of the Penguins’ and, to my utter surprise (spoiler ahead!), these animals are very violent! To the point that, when a ..read more
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Shane Epting on the Philosophy of Cities
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
Shane Epting is an assistant professor of philosophy at the Missouri University of Science and Technology. His research focuses on sustainability, transportation, environmental justice and urban futures. In this interview, we discuss the philosophy and future of cities, and why ecocentric ethics are fundamentally flawed. DP: Dr. Shane Epting, welcome to Daily Philosophy and thank you for agreeing to this interview! I am very happy and honoured to have you here. It seems that you are the rare case of a philosopher who has written nothing but fascinating papers and books. As opposed to much of p ..read more
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What's So Wrong With Engaged Buddhism?
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
In this article, Dr Michael McGhee presents an alternative understanding of Buddhism’s relation to social activism from that advocated and presented here previously in the series of articles by Ian Kidd. 1. The great German theologian Adolf von Harnack was satirised by a contemporary, George Tyrrell, who famously remarked that ‘The Christ that Harnack sees, looking back through nineteen centuries of Catholic darkness, is only the reflection of a Liberal Protestant face, seen at the bottom of a deep well.’1 In this eloquent and provocative critique of the ‘Engaged Buddhism’ movement, Ian Kidd o ..read more
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Superhero Thought Experiments
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
Chris Gavaler and Nathaniel Goldberg (2019). Superhero Thought Experiments. University of Iowa Press. 231 pages. ISBN: 978-1609386559. A very enjoyable book that presents classic arguments from philosophy by discussing examples of superhero comics. If you are interested in comics, then this book will give you a good, solid introduction to many interesting problems in philosophy, while also teaching you to see superhero comics from a more sophisticated point of view. What if an evil genius is tricking you into believing that the world around you is real when it really isn’t? What if on an alt ..read more
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