A Better Society?
Daily Philosophy
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6d ago
Anarchism has always had a mystification about it. It’s a political philosophy at its origin, but it always runs into trouble with real-world applications. Living Anarchy on a large scale? Unlikely. The idea itself feels impossible. Still, when we consider the historical lineage that planted the seeds for Anarchy, a broad spectrum of both individually and socially liberating ideas reveals itself. Further, one of history’s most overtly radical and violent Anarchists may have synthesized these ideas in a way that anybody can consider and utilize to fulfill themselves. A World Without Power Pierr ..read more
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Islam in 10 Minutes
Daily Philosophy
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1w ago
How did Islam begin and expand, what do Muslims believe, and what does the daily practice of a Muslim believer look like? Learn all of that and much more right here. Background of Islam To understand Islam, it’s useful to first see where it came from. Islam emerged in the 7th century CE in the Arabian Peninsula, where the Prophet Muhammad received divine revelations from Allah. It is important to keep in mind that “Allah” is just a word in a different language, but it refers to essentially the same God that Christians also think of as the one God. Despite of all the religious wars and the vio ..read more
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African Philosophy
Daily Philosophy
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1w ago
The great currents in history and society may often be experienced through the simple things of life. Someone singing a song, greeting a friend, or preparing a meal. Such things may tell us a great deal about a broader culture and patterns of thought. It was like this that I first came to understand the African way of thinking. I should say, more specifically, the Xhosa way of thinking – where the Xhosa people belong to the broader Nguni group of Southern Africa. I married into Africa. That is, my wife is a member of a Xhosa clan – in fact, a descendant of the great King Mpondo. Year by year ..read more
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Nothing
Daily Philosophy
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2w ago
“Lately, every time I ask my wife what’s wrong, all I get is the same old nothing. But I know better, mate. There’s too much packed in that nothing of hers. So I can’t help but wonder, what does she expect from me?” Rooney was complaining while grabbing a beer from the fridge. “To decipher everything! That’s what’s expected of you, my friend.” Max answered as confidently as he was slicing the eggplant, which he then salted to remove the excess liquid and bitterness and to ensure its silkier texture. “I guess you’re right,” muttered Rooney, while opening his beer. “I know what you mean. You can ..read more
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The Case for Feeding the Surfers
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
Universal Basic Income, or UBI, has been a long-standing, long-defended idea of wealth redistribution in society. While its pre-industrial ancestors were more concerned with an equal sharing of fertile land or territory, the idea has since evolved to be the redistribution of the communal wealth generated and owned by society at large. Also found under the labels of ‘social dividend’ or ‘national dividend,’ the main premise on which this idea rests is the productive capacity of a large group of people, most commonly a state or the world. Seeing as the production of value is a shared, communal e ..read more
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Meaning
Daily Philosophy
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1M ago
Call me Gottlob. And just to make sure we don’t get off on the wrong foot, my name is indeed Gottlob. But what is the actual meaning of names? I know, I know, that’s a tough one. I wonder about it, too. I wonder, as I sit on the deck looking at the brightest star in the sky during the day – Phosphorus. The drops of sweat trickling down my face are as salty as the sea. Have I been out in open waters for too long? I remain so lost in thoughts about the meaning of proper names that I get startled when a young man from the crew exclaims by my side. “Ah, what a night! Look at Hesperus, sir! Isn’t s ..read more
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Art, Its Value, And How We See Ourselves
Daily Philosophy
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2M ago
1. What I wish to do is to look at the value of art in the wide human cultural context, most fundamentally indeed as part of the human condition. By the human condition is meant the essential features of what it is to live a life as a human person. Whatever value we derive from experiencing art, engaging with it in particular cases, there is something beyond that which points to the value of art as a whole and as such. Art causes particular affects (that is, art causes the experience or feeling of emotion) in us. It may even inspire ideas in us and carry and transmit ideas. However, we can als ..read more
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What is Cultural Appropriation?
Daily Philosophy
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2M ago
For a long time, we have been watching the public discussion on cultural appropriation, and I know that many writers and philosophers, even guests we have interviewed here on Daily Philosophy, have been reluctant to discuss the topic in public. All the more it is necessary, in my opinion, that we philosophers try to bring some light into this discussion, and that we contribute whatever we can towards clarifying the issues involved. I started being aware of questions related to cultural appropriation while I was discussing Hermann Hesse’s book Siddhartha. You can find this article on the Daily ..read more
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Studying Philosophy at a Time of Automated Thinking
Daily Philosophy
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2M ago
Why study philosophy? A first answer would be: because we want to learn to think rigorously, which is a thinking that goes to the foundations of things. It is not merely about acquiring information for a specific field of application in a particular segment of society (‘education’). Philosophy starts by questioning what the other sciences presuppose, the assumptions of all activity, cognition, and knowledge as a whole. One can put it in loftier terms thus: philosophy is the thinking of thinking and the unity of thinking and being. It does this methodically. But what exactly is the point of it ..read more
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Plato’s Theory of Forms
Daily Philosophy
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2M ago
Main takeaways: Plato’s Theory of Forms proposes two worlds: the imperfect physical realm we see and the perfect, eternal world of abstract Forms. Physical objects are considered flawed reflections of perfect Forms, emphasizing their impermanence and constant change. Plato’s Allegory of the Cave symbolizes the journey from ignorance to knowledge, emphasizing the transition from the world of appearances to the world of Forms. Despite critiques, Plato’s Theory of Forms continues to influence metaphysical and epistemological discussions, shaping perspectives on reality and knowledge acquisition ..read more
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