253 – Scatology in the Classroom and on the Trail
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
1w ago
“So who do you think made this scat?” I asked, while holding the handful of rubber bear scat aloft. Several hands shot into the air. Omnivore. That was an easy one. Next, I pulled out a replica of scraggly fox scat, and a pile of rubber deer scat. No problem. Most kids were confident that they could categorize any scat they might find in the woods. Most kids were delightfully grossed out by the thought. Now it was time for the next step. As odd as it may seem, being able to identify animal scat significantly enhances my time outdoors. By observing scat, I get to be a detective, a scientist, an ..read more
Visit website
252 – Foraging Fervor by Mary Swanson
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
2w ago
I enjoyed making weed soup as a child. Here’s the recipe: fill a plastic pail with water, add cut grass, dandelion leaves, a generous handful of weed seeds, mix well, and show Mom. Since then, I’ve taken classes, accumulated books, and joined walks with experts on edible wild plants. I’ve progressed to wild plum and apple chutney, capered milkweed buds, and maple-glazed black walnuts. Throughout my life I’ve dreamed about a more natural lifestyle, growing and gathering my food. Can foraging really contribute to my food self-sufficiency? The post 252 – Foraging Fervor by Mary Swanson first appe ..read more
Visit website
251 – Wings on the Ground
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
3w ago
During the Museum group’s visit to El Rosario Monarch Butterfly Preserve, our guide Daniel Behn called me over to an educational display he’d laid out on a stump. Each of the three butterflies had been eaten by a different predator, and their bodies bore tell-tale clues. The male monarch at the top was eaten messily by a black-eared mouse. The butterfly on the right, a female, had her abdomen bitten cleanly off by a black-headed grosbeak. A black-backed oriole slit open the abdomen on the female on the lower left. Each of these predators—the mice, the grosbeaks, and the orioles—have something ..read more
Visit website
250 – Monarchs’ Sacred Trees
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
1M ago
Every pair of gravity-defying wings, each metamorphosed body and magnetic navigational system is worthy of awe. But it is the collective action of an entire population that brought us here. Butterflies, and monarch butterflies specifically, live all over the globe. But no pollinator garden, no butterfly conservatory even comes close to hosting this many winged wonders. Somewhere in these clusters is every single surviving monarch born on our backyard milkweed. These volcanic mountains hold the most spectacular example of an insect migration we’ve ever encountered. The post 250 – Monarchs’ Sacr ..read more
Visit website
249 – Monarch Magic
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
1M ago
Every pair of gravity-defying wings, each metamorphosed body and magnetic navigational system is worthy of awe. But it is the collective action of an entire population that brought us here. Butterflies, and monarch butterflies specifically, live all over the globe. But no pollinator garden, no butterfly conservatory even comes close to hosting this many winged wonders. Somewhere in these clusters is every single surviving monarch born on our backyard milkweed. These volcanic mountains hold the most spectacular example of an insect migration we’ve ever encountered. The post 249 – Monarch Magic ..read more
Visit website
248 – Butterflies, Pyramids, and Volcanoes
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
1M ago
Although we didn’t set out on our trip to Mexico with the intention of visiting volcanoes, that seems to have been the result. Volcanoes provide shelter to butterflies, a model for pyramids, and inspiration to many cultures. And finally, their pull in the Lake Superior basin draws me home. The post 248 – Butterflies, Pyramids, and Volcanoes first appeared on Cable Natural History Museum ..read more
Visit website
247 – Bear Tracks and Cold Toes
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
1M ago
As usual, my toes were cold. So, I hopped off my fat bike and began jogging down the trail beside it instead, trying to wiggle warmth back into my feet. Crunch, crunch, crunch, I ground icy snow under my boots with every step. The day before had been well above freezing, and the briefly slushy snow was now even more solid. I was keeping an eye on the edge of the trail when my foot landed next to the track of a larger foot. This wasn’t just some deer hunter’s big snow boot. This wide track showed five toes. And claws. Black bear! The post 247 – Bear Tracks and Cold Toes first appeared on Cable ..read more
Visit website
246 – Red-bellied Woodpeckers Moving North
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
2M ago
Red-bellied woodpeckers aren’t just expanding north into areas that now have the milder winter temperatures they are used to. The birds are expanding beyond their previous comfort zone and have somehow adapted to survive colder winters. I can relate. The climate hasn’t quite warmed enough to make winters in Northern Wisconsin comparable to the weather I grew up with in Iowa, but I’ve tweaked my wardrobe and thickened my blood enough to make the cold survivable. The post 246 – Red-bellied Woodpeckers Moving North first appeared on Cable Natural History Museum ..read more
Visit website
245 – November Child by JoAnn Malek
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
2M ago
I am a November child. The bare bones of empty trees have always fascinated me. As I venture through the November of my life, I treasure memories of role models in my family tree. I am honored by a large--even growing--network of friends. I am blessed with a strong root system and the ability to appreciate patterns my life etches on the grey November sky. The post 245 – November Child by JoAnn Malek first appeared on Cable Natural History Museum ..read more
Visit website
244 – Not a Lowly Lichen
Cable Natural History Museum
by CNHM Admin, Cable Natural History Museum
2M ago
Lichens on the whole are incredible. Each lichen is a symbiotic relationship between a species of fungus—who gives the lichen both their structure and their name—and another partner, like algae, who can photosynthesize. Together, they can live on bare rock, dead tree branches, old rusted-out cars abandoned in the woods, and much more. Nutrients come from the wind and rain. They create sugars from water and air. The post 244 – Not a Lowly Lichen first appeared on Cable Natural History Museum ..read more
Visit website

Follow Cable Natural History Museum on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR