OSIRIS-REx becomes APEX
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
9h ago
After NASA's OSIRIS-REx spacecraft's successful sample retrieval from asteroid Bennu, it's onto its next adventure as OSIRIS-APEX, the Apophis Explorer. Scott Guzewich, deputy project scientist for APEX, joins Planetary Radio to discuss the next steps for the mission as we count down to asteroid Apophis’ flyby of Earth in 2029. Then Bruce Betts, The Planetary Society’s chief scientist, pops in for What's Up and a look at other multi-world missions. Discover more at: https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2024-osiris-apex  See omnystudio.com/listener for privacy information ..read more
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The Space Race: Honoring the first African-American space explorers
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1w ago
This week on Planetary Radio, we take a peek behind the scenes at National Geographic's new documentary, “The Space Race,” which celebrates the triumphs and struggles of the first African-American space pioneers and astronauts. Co-directors Diego Hurtado de Mendoza and Lisa Cortés, space pioneer Ed Dwight, and astronaut Leland Melvin join us to discuss the film. But first, Casey Dreier, The Planetary Society's chief of space policy, and Jack Kiraly, our director of government relations, give an update on the U.S. budget gridlock that caused the recent layoff of hundreds of people at NASA's Jet ..read more
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Exploring solar eclipses through time
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
2w ago
This week on Planetary Radio, we delve into the evolution of humanity's relationship with one of our planet's most awe-inspiring phenomena: total solar eclipses. Ed Krupp, the director of Griffith Observatory in Los Angeles, will share insights from the fascinating field of archaeoastronomy. We'll explore how cultures throughout history have interpreted and imbued solar eclipses with meaning. We'll also introduce The Planetary Society's latest addition, Asa Stahl, our new science editor. Then Bruce Betts, The Planetary Society's chief scientist, shares a new random space fact and his experienc ..read more
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Space Policy Edition: Space isn’t black — it’s grey
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
2w ago
It’s a policy paper episode! Laura Delgado López joins the show to break down “Clearing the Fog: The Grey Zones of Space Governance” by Jessica West and Jordan Miller. Grey zones are harmful or disruptive space activities that fall short of provoking a military response — ideally. But the ambiguity, by its nature, could generate unplanned escalation and conflict. What are these grey zones, and why do they exist? What are their consequences to humanity, even for those in nations not actively pursuing spaceflight? And by what means can we reduce the uncertainty and, therefore the risk to space o ..read more
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The 20th landing anniversary of Spirit and Opportunity
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
3w ago
January marks 20 years since NASA’s twin Mars rovers, Spirit and Opportunity, touched down on the surface of the red planet. Matt Golombek, project scientist for the Mars Exploration Rover Project, joins Planetary Radio to celebrate. But first, the countdown to the next great American total solar eclipse continues. Kate Howells, The Planetary Society’s public education specialist and Canadian space policy adviser, explains why this periodic alignment of our Earth, Moon, and Sun is more rare on the scale of the Universe than you might think. Stick around for What’s Up with Bruce Betts, our chie ..read more
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Blazing a trail to the Moon
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1M ago
We're celebrating lunar missions and the space advocacy that helps make them happen this week on Planetary Radio. Casey Dreier and Jack Kiraly, chief of space policy and director of government relations at The Planetary Society, update you on our next Day of Action in Washington, D.C. Kate Howells, our public education specialist, shares the triumph and challenges of the Japanese space agency's SLIM lunar lander, as Japan becomes the fifth nation to make a successful soft landing on the Moon. We begin our coverage of the upcoming 2024 total solar eclipse in Mexico, the United States, and Canad ..read more
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What’s hidden inside planets?
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1M ago
Venture into the hearts of worlds and uncover how we study planetary interiors this week on Planetary Radio. Sabine Stanley, professor of planetary physics at Johns Hopkins University and author of the new book "What's Hidden Inside Planets?" discusses some of the amazing things that lie under the surfaces of the worlds in our Solar System. But first, Mat Kaplan, senior communications advisor at The Planetary Society, gives an update on the first Commercial Lunar Payload Services mission and the timeline for NASA's Artemis program. We close out this show with Bruce Betts, our chief scientist ..read more
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JWST finds a new lead in the search for life on a mysterious exoplanet
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1M ago
This week on Planetary Radio, we're diving into one of the most remarkable new exoplanet discoveries with the help of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). JWST has detected signs of methane and carbon dioxide in the atmosphere of K2-18 b. This discovery could reshape our search for life beyond Earth and teach us more about the enigmatic class of exoplanets known as sub-Neptunes. Our guest, Knicole Colón, is the deputy project scientist for exoplanet science for JWST. She'll fill us in on all of the details. Stick around for What's Up with Bruce Betts, the chief scientist of The Planetary Soc ..read more
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Space Policy Edition: India’s growing space ambitions
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1M ago
The history of India’s space program is, in many ways, the inverse of that of the US and Russia. While the two superpowers were outpacing each other in space spectaculars in their early decades, India — which began its space program around the same time in 1963 — prioritized practical programs by developing its own launch capability and launching satellites for weather, communications, and regional positioning systems. It is only in the 21st century that India began embracing the more symbolic feats of spaceflight, first with its launches of robotic spacecraft, including the Chandrayaan series ..read more
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Revisiting the discovery of phosphorus on Enceladus
Planetary Radio: Space Exploration, Astronomy and Science
by The Planetary Society
1M ago
This week on Planetary Radio, we are revisiting one of the biggest recent headlines in planetary science, the detection of Phosphorus in the oceans of Saturn’s moon Enceladus. Phosphorus is a key ingredient for life on Earth, and this discovery marks the first time it has been found in an ocean off of Earth. Chris Glein, a lead scientist at the Southwest Research Institute, joins us to discuss the discovery and its implications for the search for life. Then Bruce Betts returns for What's Up. Discover more at: https://www.planetary.org/planetary-radio/2024-revisiting-phosphorus-on-enceladus Se ..read more
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