Brunneous
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Brunneous is an adjective that means dark brown.  Our word of the day comes almost directly from the Latin word brunneus (broo NAY oose) which means ‘brown.’ Here’s an example of brunneous in use: The brunneous color of the trees is very different from my surroundings during the week. It would be nice to have that shade when I wake up each day, but it would take forever to paint all the concrete and steel brown.  ..read more
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Cerulean
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Cerulean is an adjective that means sky blue.  Our word of the day dates back to the mid 17th century and the Latin word caelum (KY loom) which means ‘sky.’ Here’s an example of cerulean in use: Andrea’s striking cerulean eyes were the first thing I noticed when I regained consciousness in the hospital. The second thing I noticed is the way her blue eyes matched her dress.  ..read more
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Rubricate
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Rubricate is a verb that means to color red.  The Latin word rubrica (ROO brick uh) means ‘red.’ By the Late 16th century, this word had been imported to English and turned into a verb which meant to turn something red.’ Here’s an example: The author decided to rubricate the letters that indicated the location of the main character. By having this information in red, there was no chance the reader could confuse his location with other locations.  ..read more
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Castaneous
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Castaneous is an adjective that means chestnut colored.  The Latin word for ‘chestnut’ is castanea (cass TAN ee uh). By the 17th century, this would branch off into several English words, including ‘castanets,’ a small musical instrument made of wood and our word of the day, an adjective to describe something ‘chestnut colored.’ Here’s an example of castaneous in use: The castaneous tan I acquired last summer took three weeks in Italy and a lot of laying around in the sun. If we had visited Norway, as we first planned to do, my chestnut-colored complexion would have been a lot closer to p ..read more
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Heterogenous
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Heterogenous is an adjective that means ‘diverse in character and content.’  Our word of the day is from the Latin word ‘heteros,’ (HET er ose) which means ‘different’ or ‘other.’ It’s been around since the early 17th century. Here’s an example: The heterogenous nature of the animals in that area makes it difficult for them to get along. By putting together those creatures from such diverse backgrounds, they threaten to harm the chemistry.  ..read more
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Handsel
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Handsel is a noun that refers to a gift for good luck.  Our word of the day dates back to the Middle English period and is occasionally used as a verb just like its synonym ‘gift.’ Here’s an example: When my parents gave me a car as a handsel on my 18th birthday, they didn’t know they were changing my life. That new Toyota may not have given me good luck, but it certainly brought good times.  ..read more
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Simpatico
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Simpatico is an adjective that means having shared characteristics or attributes.  Our word of the day is a loan word that has been borrowed from Italian since the early 20th century. Here’s an example of it.  I had a feeling I’d be simpatico with my new neighbors the minute I saw their lawn sign that declared ‘no Yankees fans’ in front of their door. Nothing brings together strangers like a hatred of a sports team.  ..read more
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Umbra
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Umbra is a noun that refers to a shadow or darkness.  Our word of the day began life as a Latin word for ‘shade.’ Since the late 16th century, it’s been an English word for ‘shade’ or ‘shadow.’ Here’s an example: The long umbra cast along the lake is a sight to behold. The fact that it’s a shadow of a port-o-potty makes the image a little less romantic.  ..read more
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Vocable
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Vocable is a noun that refers to a single syllable that carries a meaning despite not being a ‘real’ word.  The Latin word vocabulum ( vo COB oo loom) has given us such English words as ‘vocal’ and ‘vocabulary.’ Our word of the day has been around since the Middle English period. Here’s an example: When my kids are enjoying a meal, they tend to express it in the most vocable terms. They don't use actual words to convey their joy, just a simple, ‘mmmmm ..read more
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Lawfare
Word of the Day
by Word of the Day
1M ago
Lawfare is a noun that refers to the use of lawsuits as a means of intimidation and combat.  Our word of the day is a very recent addition to the English language that combines the common English words ‘law’ and ‘warfare.’ here’s an example: After getting laid off, I tried to bully my former boss Stan with a series of excessive lawsuits, but in retrospect, I may have made a bad decision. It wasn’t such a smart move to use lawfare against a practicing attorney.  ..read more
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