Former Tata Motors CEO Ravi Kant on the merits of leading from the back
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
15h ago
We’ve heard about the popular phrase “leading from the front”. It means taking the lead in making decisions and showing people the way. But Ravi Kant, former vice chairman and CEO of Tata Motors, is of the belief that business leaders should no longer aspire to lead from the front, but instead, aim to lead from the back. Why does he say that? What does he mean? And is this something organisations will even be open to implementing? Let’s find out. In this episode, Kant discusses his new book ‘Leading from the Back’, which he has co-authored with bestselling writers Harry Paul and Ross Reck ..read more
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Gretchen Morgenson and Josh Rosner on how private equity can plunder the economy
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
1M ago
In this episode, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Gretchen Morgenson and Joshua Rosner, managing director of Graham Fisher and Co., talk about their book These are the Plunderers: How PE runs and wrecks America. The book is a well-researched critique of how private equity firms in the US that specialise in buying companies, load them with debt and completely squeeze them for profits. The authors talk to Divya Shekhar about the insurance takeover by PE, the lack of transparency in their dealings, and the responsibility of the media while covering PE billionaires ..read more
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Robin Sharma on wealth, leadership, and how to separate good advice from bad
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
1M ago
The author and leadership coach, known for international bestsellers The Monk Who Sold His Ferrari and The 5 AM Club, speaks with Divya Shekhar about his forthcoming book The Wealth Money Can’t Buy, and the relevance of self-help books in the age motivation content fatigue, thanks to social media. He also discusses why hubris takes down many great people and companies, why most CEOs and billionaires are “cash rich and happiness poor”, how technology takes us away from creativity, and the secret behind how successful people separate good advice and decisions from all the noise ..read more
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Raghuram Rajan and Rohit Lamba on reimagining India’s economic growth path
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
2M ago
Raghuram Rajan and Rohit Lamba believe that India’s best days are still ahead and that the country shouldn’t lose its biggest strength—its democracy—by “any stretch of the imagination”. In their new book, ‘Breaking the Mould: Reimagining India’s Economic Future’, Rajan, former Reserve Bank of India (RBI) governor, and Lamba, an economist at Pennsylvania State University, talk about why creativity and human capital should be at the centre of growth and development. They also tell Divya Shekhar why it’s essential to reprioritize our resources to focus on the basics ..read more
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In conversation with Kashmir Hill: Facial recognition technology and the end of privacy
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
3M ago
What if I tell you there’s a company that can scrape every photo you casually upload on social media? A company that uses powerful facial recognition technology in ways that even big tech companies like Google and Facebook have refrained from using. The New York Times Journalist Kashmir Hill speaks to Divya Shekhar about her book Your Face Belongs to Us, which investigates the inner workings of Clearview AI, a controversial facial recognition startup. She discusses the promises and perils of such technology and its impact on privacy ..read more
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Fali Nariman on the Constitution, judiciary and the future of Indian democracy
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
4M ago
Fali Nariman is arguably the greatest living expert on the Constitution. He started his legal practice the year the Constitution of India was enacted in November 1949. He spoke with Divya Shekhar and Forbes India Editor Brian Carvalho about his new book 'You Must Know Your Constitution'. He discusses pertinent issues, including how the Constitution can be taken to the masses, questions around sedition and censorship, national vs official languages and whether it’s time for India to have a new Constitution. (Published by Hay House Publishers India and distributed by Penguin Random House India ..read more
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Madhav Gadgil on India’s priorities towards conservation, climate and sustainability
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
4M ago
All through his career, Madhav Gadgil has worked closely with communities on the ground, roping in researchers, policy-makers, NGOs, farmers, teachers, students and citizens for environmental conservation. His contributions towards saving the Western Ghats and building an inventory to monitor biodiversity in India, among other things, have made him one of the country’s most eminent field ecologists. Gadgil speaks with Divya Shekhar about his newly-released memoir, A Walk Up The Hill, and summarises his decades-long experience of how we interact with the environment, the role of government and ..read more
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Water in the age of climate change, with Harini Nagendra and Seema Mundoli
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
5M ago
The teachers of sustainability at the Azim Premji University in Bengaluru discuss their new book ‘Shades of Blue: Connecting the Drops in India’s Cities’, which combines scientific rigour with anecdotes, community histories, and nostalgia to take us through water bodies across the country. The authors talk to Divya Shekhar about our complicated collective history with water, community warriors who are showing the way, whether we need to put a price on water, and how we can start rebuilding our relationship with it ..read more
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Nagaraja Prakasam on why entrepreneurs should solve for ‘Bharat’, not just India
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
5M ago
In his book ‘Back to Bharat: In Search of a Sustainable Future’, impact investor Nagaraja Prakasam distinguishes between India and Bharat. For him, the word ‘Bharat’ means the “ignored billion” in the country. These are people, he says, that are still largely left out of the digital revolution—venture investors are mostly wary of them, and businesses stay away as they do not see profit in solving for them. Prakasam, who calls himself a farmer, retired from a software career at the age of 41 and has since spent his time backing social enterprises. He talks to Divya Shekhar about his new bo ..read more
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Azim Premji Foundation CEO Anurag Behar on education and stories from the ground
From the bookshelves of Forbes India
by Forbes India
6M ago
Anurag Behar is the CEO of the Azim Premji Foundation that has been working in the space of education and now healthcare. In his new book, ‘A Matter of the Heart: Education in India’, he shares a collection of essays that takes us to schools in some of the most remote villages in India. Behar leads an organization of thousands of people working across districts in India. He tells Divya Shekhar that his book is about stories of ordinary people doing extraordinary work. It also throws light on the struggles and infrastructure challenges at these schools, but at its core, it is about voices that ..read more
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