Eunice Newton Foote: Scientific ladies – experiments with condensed gases
STEMinism
by Maia, Ellen and Susi
2y ago
We are super excited to bring this story to y'all! In this episode we are discussing the story of Eunice Newton Foote, a true scientist (not an amateur scientist) who was a pioneer of Climate Change research. Her discovery of the Greenhouse effect that occurs with the presence of CO2 in the atmosphere was groundbreaking, but was almost left unnoticed. She found that higher levels of atmospheric CO2 trapped more heat from radiation. Even though her research was published as short papers in several American and European journals, John Tyndall, who is often cited as the discoverer of climate chan ..read more
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Gladys Iola Tantaquidgeon
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
2y ago
Hi everyone! A little late for national Indigenous day in the USA, but today we are talking about Dr. Gladys Iola Tantaquidgeon, who was a Mohegan medicine woman, anthropologist, author, tribal council member, and elder. She was devoted to help minoritized women as well, so we think she was one of the first Steministas! Shoutout to the Smithsonian Instagram, who inspired this podcast episode. Also check out the Google website today, which is in honor of an Indigenous person, We:wa, a Zuni Native American who didn't identify with traditional gender definitions. So many more amazing people to re ..read more
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Trota of Salerno
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
2y ago
Little is known about Trota of Salerno - and some of what is may be false! What is true: she was a medical practitioner in the 11th and 12th centuries and wrote Practica Secundum Trotam (Book of Practical Medicine). What is false: she did not write the Trotula! Listen in to this episode to learn more facts and misinformation about Trota. References Benton, John F. “Trotula, Women’s Problems, and the Professionalization of Medicine in the Middle Ages.” Humanities Working Paper 98 (November 1984). Green, Monica. “Women’s Medical Practice and Health Care in Medieval Europe.” Signs: Jou ..read more
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Alice Augusta Ball
STEMinism
by Maia, Ellen and Susi
2y ago
Through her groundbreaking work as a chemist, Alice Ball changed the lives of thousands of people. She was the first black women to receive a master's degree from the University of Hawaii and she became a professor at the age of 23. However, her story was very nearly lost to history. We are excited and honored to be among the people now celebrating her achievements and role as a pioneering STEMinist in the 1920s.  ..read more
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Maria Sibylla Merian
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
3y ago
 Hi everyone, it's been a while again. Oh boy we've been busy. I bet you were too! We're back though with a new episode, this time a German/Swiss naturalist, entomologist (one of the first) and botanical illustrator. Because of her we now know that insects don't just spontaneously emerge from poop. She also...you won't believe it, coined the name (we think) Vogelspinne, which means tarantula in German! She was a world traveler and appeared to be good hearted, always acknowledging the people she talked and who helped her out with her discoveries, no matter their rank. References https://ww ..read more
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The Matilda Effect
STEMinism
by
3y ago
Instead of covering a specific woman in STEM this week, Ellen and Susi discuss the Matilda Effect. The Matilda Effect, coined by Margaret Rossiter in 1993, is the phenomenon where women in STEM are under- or unrecognized for their contributions to STEM fields. Listen in to learn more about this phenomenon, and who Matilda is. References Dominus, Susan. “Women Scientists Were Written Out Of History. It’s Margaret Rossiter’s Lifelong Mission to Fix That.” Smithsonian Magazine, October 2019. Gage, Matilda Joslyn. “Woman as an Inventor.” The North American Review 136, no. 318 (May 1883): 478-489 ..read more
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Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkins
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
3y ago
Hi everybody, we're back with a new episode on one of my favorite woman we've covered so far, Dorothy Crowfoot Hodgkins. Dorothy discovered the 3D structure of penicillin and many essential biomolecules. Penicillin is an antibiotic that was discovered in fungi, which saved many lives, especially during the war. Dorothy's whole family is fascinating, we hope you enjoy her story as much as we did. Also check out the Netflix mushroom documentary Fantastic Fungi!!! Referenceshttps://www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/science/leading-figures/dorothy-hodgkin-the-woman-who-saw-penicillin/ https://en.m.wikipedi ..read more
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Henriette Avrum
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
3y ago
Henriette Avrum was a computer programmer who revolutionized libraries with her creation of Machine-Readable Cataloging (MARC) for the Library of Congress. Listen to Ellen gush to Susi about how important MARC is to librarians on this episode of STEMinism ..read more
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Rosalind Franklin
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
3y ago
Hi friends! You probably missed us last week :) Ellen and I decided we will take one week out each month to take a well deserved break. It may not seem as much, but each episode takes a bunch of work for research, recording and cutting :) But we're so glad to be back. This week with Rosalind Franklin, the mother of DNA. Rosalind and her PhD student took the first picture of DNA, which was then swooped up by 3 men, who went and received a Nobel Prize for their discovery of the structure of DNA. We believe Rosalind would have deserved to share that prize as well. Unfortunately her life was cut s ..read more
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Nettie Stevens
STEMinism
by Ellen and Susi
3y ago
Let's talk about sex...chromosomes! Nettie Stevens is known for discovery the Y sex chromosome and the part it plays in genetics, but often is unrecognized for her contributions. Listen to learn more! References Bainbridge, David. The X in Sex: How the X Chromosome Controls Our Lives. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 2003. Brush, Stephen G. "Nettie M. Stevens and the Discovery of Sex Determination by Chromosomes." Isis 69, no. 2 (June 1978): 163-172. Cross, Patricia C. and John P. Steward. "Nettie Maria Stevens." Sandstone & Tile 17, no. 1 (Winter 1993): 3-12 ..read more
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