Experimental mRNA Vaccine May Protect Against All 20 Influenza Virus Subtypes
NIH Director's Blog » Influenza Virus
by Lawrence Tabak, D.D.S., Ph.D.
1M ago
Caption: Messenger RNA (mRNA)– nanoparticle vaccine encoding hemagglutinin antigens (H with number) from all 20 known influenza subtypes. Flu season is now upon us, and protecting yourself and loved ones is still as easy as heading to the nearest pharmacy for your annual flu shot. These vaccines are formulated each year to protect against up to four circulating strains of influenza virus, and they generally do a good job of this. What they can’t do is prevent future outbreaks of more novel flu viruses that occasionally spill over from other species into humans, thereby avoiding a future influe ..read more
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CRISPR-Based Anti-Viral Therapy Could One Day Foil the Flu—and COVID-19
NIH Director's Blog » Influenza Virus
by Dr. Francis Collins
1y ago
CRISPR gene-editing technology has tremendous potential for making non-heritable DNA changes that can treat or even cure a wide range of devastating disorders, from HIV to muscular dystrophy Now, a recent animal study shows that another CRISPR system—targeting viral RNA instead of human DNA—could work as an inhaled anti-viral therapeutic that can be preprogrammed to seek out and foil potentially almost any flu strain and many other respiratory viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus that causes COVID-19. How can that be? Other CRISPR gene-editing systems rely on a sequence-specific gui ..read more
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Feed a Virus, Starve a Bacterium?
NIH Director's Blog » Influenza Virus
by Dr. Francis Collins
1y ago
Thinkstock/Stockbyte Yes, the season of colds and flu is coming. You’ve probably heard the old saying “feed a cold and starve a fever.” But is that sound advice? According to new evidence from mouse studies, there really may be a scientific basis for “feeding” diseases like colds and flu that are caused by viruses, as well as for “starving” certain fever-inducing conditions caused by bacteria. In the latest work, an NIH-funded research team found that providing nutrition to mice infected with the influenza virus significantly improved their survival. In contrast, the exact opposite proved tr ..read more
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