Interview with a Single Foster Mother
Adopting.org
by Christina Gochnauer
8M ago
This woman is someone I’ve known and loved since high school. So, for a long time. She’s a single foster mom and a nurse. She amazes me. I got to ask her a few questions and she was gracious enough to answer with honesty and transparency.  For the safety and anonymity of everyone, she’s going by a pseudonym.  Me: So, Heidi, can you tell us a little bit about yourself? Heidi: I have always had an interest in advocating for and showing love to kids in need. Becoming a foster parent was something I had an interest in pursuing, but always thought, “after I’m married.” So, I kept putting ..read more
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10 Things I Wish I Knew Before Adoption
Adopting.org
by Christina Gochnauer
8M ago
1. It’s not about me.  I’m not the savior of anyone. I’m not a superhero. The kids are a gift to me, not the other way around. They had parents before me, I didn’t have kids before adoption.  2. It’s harder than it looks to be an adoptive parent. Lifetime, Hallmark, and the musical Annie paint a picture of adoptive bliss: children who are thankful and grateful for adoption and kids who happily integrate into an entirely new, scary, different world. I’ve had hours of training and I still sometimes break down crying over how difficult it is to keep it together when their trauma is maki ..read more
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5 Things Adoptive Families Want You To Know
Adopting.org
by Christina Gochnauer
8M ago
Do you know an adoptive family? Have you checked in on them lately? They might be fine but just in case they aren’t, I have something to say. Here are some things adoptive families want you to know. 1. If we don’t hang out as much, there’s a reason. I know that feels like a line. However, adoption is an emotional transition with a bunch of moving parts. While I thought I would love to take my kids everywhere and do all of the things I saw biological families doing (going out and being around large groups of people, mostly), I found myself unable to do so. My kids were emotionally and physicall ..read more
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Adoption Pet Peeves
Adopting.org
by Christina Gochnauer
8M ago
Ahem *steps on soapbox* I have gathered you here today to discuss one of my biggest, major peeves. Let me start by telling you I love animals. Young me thought she was going to be a veterinarian, zoologist, or marine biologist for a significant portion of her life. I have four dogs, two goldfish, and a turtle. We are even, occasionally, home to several dozen tadpoles. My problem is not with loving animals profusely. My problem is the way people talk about adoption.  I once had a whole conversation with a woman who I thought was talking to me about human foster care and adoption and it was ..read more
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Getting Your Home Ready for Adoption
Adopting.org
by Guest Post
8M ago
As you get ready to step into this new phase of life, whether you already have kids or not, the adoption process takes time. While stocking your nursery and pantry may be easy, the process of getting your home and current family ready takes a little longer. Whether the decision to adopt came from wanting to grow your family or other personal reasons, here are a few steps to prepare your home and family. Home Study Preparation When applying to adopt, you will need to complete a home study. This can look different based on how you’re choosing to adopt (international or domestic) as each has diff ..read more
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Is Adoption Right for Me?
Adopting.org
by Jennifer Jones
10M ago
When my husband and I began our adoption journey, I spent countless hours on the web googling “Is adoption right for me?” No one in either of our immediate families had been touched by adoption. We didn’t know of anyone who had been adopted or who had adopted children. My closest connection was a friend of a family from my parent’s church who had adopted a little girl from South Korea 20 years before. It was a stretch, to say the least. Two international adoptions from two different countries later, I have learned a lot about adoption. I have learned that adoptive connections can run deeper th ..read more
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Navigating the Cocoon
Adopting.org
by Kristina Frazier
11M ago
When you decide to pursue adoption, there will be many instances when your family’s situation will look unique from others who have gone before you. Life after adoption will also be unique. Whether that be in how you discipline, the vacations you take, the names you use, or the holidays you celebrate, there will be many circumstances that call for leading your family in a nonconventional way. One way that may be very different than how others approach raising their children is the idea of cocooning.  Cocooning is the time after an adopted child has come home where the family chooses to li ..read more
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Close Conversations: A Tale Of Hope And Love
Adopting.org
by Lisa Kersey
11M ago
In my last interview, we met my son’s biological mother. We discussed her early life, her struggle with addiction, her biological children, and how she is working every day to overcome her addictions and remain healthy. If you asked me the day I met her when she was probably 12 years old if I would ever think our story would turn into this, I probably would laugh at you. But here we are. In that interview, she allowed me to ask questions about anything and everything, and answered them for me, truthfully. When I let a friend read my article before submitting it, she said she wanted more. She w ..read more
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Understanding Trauma and Traumaversaries
Adopting.org
by Rebecca Dell
11M ago
Did you know that it is possible for your body to unconsciously remember a traumatic event? The brain is an amazing machine and it will move mountains to protect you. When a traumatic event happens to a person, the brain may tuck the event away. Even though the person may not remember that traumatic event, it may show up in association with, when, or how the trauma occurred. A traumaversary is a term used to identify a pattern of behavior that shows up at the same time year after year in association with a traumatic event.  Many adoptive families have found that traumaversaries are very r ..read more
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Am I Ready to Adopt
Adopting.org
by Janelle Oliveira
11M ago
Making the decision to adopt begins with asking yourself, “Am I ready to adopt?” Knowing whether or not you are ready to adopt is a pretty broad question and feels different for everyone. The answer to this somewhat loaded question will be based on some deep-diving, soul searching, and honesty. Something to consider is that whether or not you feel ready to adopt, there are many factors that you may or may not be able to control once you get started. Understanding that and being prepared to roll with the punches is just as important as being confident in your choice to begin your adoption journ ..read more
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