Thanks to ABTA, I was able to get the support I needed – Penny’s postnatal mental health journey
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
1M ago
At the delivery of my 2nd daughter Paige Abbigale, after a very quick induction due to my GD at 38 + 3 weeks, we were faced with an umbilical cord prolapse, which turned into a medical emergency with both my life and the life of my daughter in the hands of my OBGYN. One minute I was going to be rushed for an emergency c-section, but no time, I had to push. All I remember is the room filling with people, I kept asking if my baby was okay, and no one gave me an answer. When she was delivered she was blue, and not breathing and she was rushed over to the incubator. I was told we would have to ..read more
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It will be different this time – birth after birth trauma, Sinead’s story
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
2M ago
I had so little experience with babies or pregnant women that I truly had no idea what to expect the first time I got pregnant. There was no reference point, and I didn’t seek one out. I trusted my body would know what to do and the extent of my preparation was to see a women’s health physio during and after my pregnancy. With years spent playing sport, I was focused on the physical impact pregnancy and birth might have on my body and never considered the emotional or psychological changes that would take place.    My birth began as many births do – at home in the early stages o ..read more
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“My calls for help were overlooked.” The reality of accessing postnatal mental health services, Melinda’s story.
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
2M ago
Here I was, a content yet waddling and mildly tired (nearly) 42-week pregnant women. I had a trouble free and relaxed pregnancy, with a nicely growing baby. I remember attending a planned ‘post-dates’ appointment at 41 weeks and 3 days. I remember this so vividly because I recall saying to the midwife that I could happily plod along for another 2 weeks. Although I felt slow and only a little tired, I felt healthy, content and had big trust in my body to birth whenever it was ready.    Fast forward to two days later where I was feeling the pressure to have my waters broken and be ..read more
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Birth with HELLP – Jo’s story
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
2M ago
I love a good birth story, however recently I have been thinking deeply about the trauma mothers and partners can carry beyond birth. For Perinatal Mental Health Week, I sat down with my friend Jo to talk about her experience of pregnancy, birth and HELLP syndrome. Almost 10 years later and still feeling a little uncomfortable, Jo tells me her story in full detail for the first time.  I share Jo’s story in the hope to raise awareness of HELLP Syndrome, to highlight the importance of preparing your mind and body for birth and surrounding yourself with a supportive team. We all have ou ..read more
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Emily’s Story – next birth after trauma
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
3M ago
I’ve always been pretty organised. I was the kid who did their homework the day it was set and I always, always follow the instructions on flat pack furniture. So, when I fell pregnant with my son in November 2018, I prepared, as I always did: pregnancy yoga, hypnobirthing, a meticulous birth plan.   Preparation did nothing, though, when it all went wrong. My son never engaged until my waters broke and his head slammed into my pelvis, where it stayed wedged and swelling until he was removed by 6 attempts of forceps, with no pain relief for four of those attempts. While I was offered a ca ..read more
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Why we need better access to pelvic health physiotherapy outside of major cities
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
3M ago
I’ll just say it; Living outside of a major city in Australia puts you at a disadvantage. Don’t get me wrong, I live regionally, and I love it. I have no desire to return to the chaos of the capital city I studied in. I appreciate the slower-paced, coastal and walkable community I call home. However, I do not believe that this is some sort of moral failing which means I should have less access to healthcare than my metropolitan counterparts.    In Australia, most women who give birth will sustain some degree of pelvic floor injury,1,2. Yet access to pelvic health physioth ..read more
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5 things I wish I’d known about birth trauma and cerebral palsy (Lisa’s story)
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
4M ago
Over 14 years later, I still shudder when I remember how quickly my waters were broken. I remember the wires that restricted my movement and how the gas made me vomit. But it’s the last 15 minutes of my seven hour labour that will stay with me forever. My baby was stuck. His heart rate was dropping. I was told to push as hard and fast as I could. So I did. My beautiful first born son, Cody, arrived into this world with the umbilical cord wrapped around his neck. It was 25 long and terrifying minutes before he took his first unassisted breath. After a textbook pregnancy, my husband and I w ..read more
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Corie’s story – birth trauma and NICU
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
4M ago
Trigger Warning: This birth story discusses trauma, topics discussed include forceps delivery, emergency theatre and postpartum haemorrhage, and NICU stay. If you are seeking support for your birth trauma, we have downloadable resources here or join one of our free Peer2Peer Support programs.  As a first time mum, I didn’t quite know what to expect during birth. I had taken classes, and read plenty of books, but I couldn’t really imagine what it would be like. All I could picture was, regardless of the type of birth, the moment that I pulled my baby to my chest for the fir ..read more
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A little letter to the NICU parents from the NICU nurses
Birth Trauma Blog
by Lisa Griffith
4M ago
First of all we want to congratulate you on your new bundle (or bundles) of joy! What a journey! The rollercoaster of emotions you must have felt from the time you found out you were to become parents and the time is finally here!   However we know that being in the neonatal unit is not something you have prepared for.  Whether your baby was born early, needs support with their breathing, requires medicine for infections, or phototherapy for jaundice just to name a few – as nurses we can only imagine what an overwhelming and stressful time it must be right now.  As NICU n ..read more
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Birth Trauma Awareness Week 2022 – Wrap Up
Birth Trauma Blog
by Amy Dawes
5M ago
TRIGGER WARNING: Some discussion of birth injuries. Please read with care. If you’d like to connect with peer support find out more here. Birth Trauma Awareness Week 2022 took place July 17-24. The theme this year was; Physical Birth Injuries: diagnosis and treatment. Together with our colleagues, Birth Trauma Association UK and Make Birth Better (UK) we released a report, which focused on the impact, diagnosis, and treatment of physical birth injuries. Our findings shine a light on a silent epidemic; the major impact birth injuries can have the on daily life of women, as well as affe ..read more
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