Change weightlifting to lowering, reduce your gym time
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2d ago
Exercise is great, but many of us would still rather do less of it. Luckily, new research from Edith Cowan University suggests there’s a quick way to decrease your gym time while maximizing effectiveness — and no, it’s not a scam. The recent study found that lowering weights, as a motion, rather than picking weights up or pulling them toward you, is a type of muscle contraction most effective at increasing muscle strength and size. In fact, across groups of study participants asked to perform three different types of dumbbell curls, those who started with the weights up and slowly lowered them ..read more
Visit website
Spanking children affects brain activity in kids
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2d ago
To spank or not to spank. For many parents, that is the question. From decades of research, a conventional wisdom eventually emerged: Spanking children is linked to negative effects on behavior, including an increased risk of anxiety and depression. Now, a study by Florida State University researchers sheds new light on how corporal punishment affects a child’s neural system to produce these adverse effects. In a study of 149 children ages 11 to 14, scientists used a monetary guessing game and a video game-like task while measuring brain-wave activity from the scalp. With that data, each parti ..read more
Visit website
Too little sleep in middle age can raise disease risk
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2d ago
If you’re middle age or older, hopefully this won’t keep you up at night: Getting less than five hours of sleep can heighten your risk of developing at least two chronic diseases. That’s what researchers at University College in London determined after analyzing the effect of sleep duration among more than 7,000 people between the ages of 50 and 70. Not only was a lack of sleep associated with chronic diseases, it was also linked to higher death rates in those age groups. At age 50, those who consistently slept five hours or less were 20% more likely to be diagnosed with a chronic disease such ..read more
Visit website
Winter weather may be frightful, but your skin doesn’t have to be.
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2d ago
As the temperature and humidity fall, skin becomes dry, cracked and itchy. It needs extra TLC to stay supple and soft. Banish the winter woes and keep your skin smooth by incorporating a few tips into your skin care routine. First, moisturize often. Frigid outdoor temperatures and artificial indoor heaters zap the skin of its natural moisture, so it’s a good idea to invest in a heartier moisturizer during the winter months. Look for a fragrance-free, hypoallergenic lotion or cream. To maximize its benefits, apply moisturizer immediately after you shower — the humidity in the bathroom keeps the ..read more
Visit website
Scientists gain insight into PCBs and our bodies
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2d ago
Once hailed as an “industrial miracle,” manmade polychlorinated biphenyls, or PCBs, were used to make all kinds of things. Invented in 1929, scientists later found PCBs were carcinogens and they were widely banned from commercial use in 1979. But for decades they were ubiquitous, used to make children’s fingerpaints. Trash bags. Containers you kept leftovers in. Baby bottles. Magazines. Fluorescent bulbs. Yet, even with a ban, PCBs still haunt us as they linger in the environment. Now, a team of Japanese researchers say that enzymes produced by the body unevenly metabolize those lingering PCBs ..read more
Visit website
Poll: Most of us notice signs of aging around 42
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
1w ago
We age second after unrelenting second. We won’t notice any difference in our bodies day to day, month to month, even year to year. The clock, however, never stops advancing, destination unknown. Over time we start to realize our bodies aren’t as spry as that long gone 23-year-old who could exercise all day without the hint of ache or pain. Chances are, you were or will be about 42 when the revelation really hits. That’s according to a poll of 2,000 Americans by the market research company OnePoll, which found, on average, people notice the signs of aging around that age. Those first gray hair ..read more
Visit website
New way to limit what mosquitoes ‘hear’ may help reduce population
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2w ago
Picture this: You’re meeting a date at a restaurant. When you see them, you get excited and call their name. But they don’t seem to hear you … then they walk away. Rude? Sure, but it’s a social rejection Japanese researchers hope mosquitos begin to experience after their new study. That’s right. Scientists have figured out a way to make female mosquitoes’ mating “buzz” fall on deaf males’ “ears.” Disrupting mosquito populations is important not only because they are annoying — they also transmit dangerous diseases to humans such as malaria, dengue [ding-gay] and Zika. Although much research ha ..read more
Visit website
For treating anxiety, mindfulness can be an effective option
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2w ago
For people with anxiety and depression, there’s a well-known drug that delivers consistent results.  Now, there may be a pill-free option for some: Recent research shows that a stress reduction regimen can be a reliable alternative. Researchers at Georgetown University Medical Center have found that a guided anti-stress program known as mindfulness-based stress reduction, or MBSR, works as well as escitalopram [es-sye-tal’-oh-pram]. The drug is also known by its brand name, Lexapro. During a study involving nearly 300 people in the northeastern United States, patients were separated into ..read more
Visit website
A three-part Rx for waking up with energy
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2w ago
How often do you wake up feeling perky? Once in a blue moon? Never? New research suggests that paying close attention to three things — sleep, exercise and breakfast — could turn you into a morning person. The University of California, Berkeley’s three-pronged prescription includes substantial physical activity during the day, sleeping longer and later in the morning, and having a low-sugar breakfast high in complex carbohydrates. The study tracked more than 800 people for two weeks. Participants ate a variety of breakfasts, wore watches to record their movements and sleep, logged their food i ..read more
Visit website
Gardening helps with loneliness, study says
Health in a Heartbeat
by Kimberley Smith, UF Health
2w ago
Looking for new friends? Dust off your gardening gloves and locate your knee pads. A recent study from the University of Essex indicates that having a green thumb may be one key to thwarting loneliness — and finding a connection with your community. Throughout the pandemic, people experienced a range of feelings, many of them negative. Stress, grief, boredom and isolation flourished. But for a group of volunteers at a community garden in the United Kingdom, other feelings also emerged: They found solace in sowing seeds, fulfillment in growing vegetables and flowers, and a renewed sense of purp ..read more
Visit website

Follow Health in a Heartbeat on Feedspot

Continue with Google
OR