Think AI Can Perceive Emotion? Think Again.
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
4d ago
Imagine that you are interviewing for a job. The interviewer asks a question that makes you think. While concentrating, you furrow your brow and your face forms a scowl. A camera in the room feeds your scowling face to an AI model, which determines that you’ve become angry. The interview team decides not to hire you because, in their view, you are too quick to anger. Well, if you weren’t angry during the interview, you probably would be now. … In 2019, the journal Psychological Science in the Public Interest engaged five senior scientists, including me, to examine the scientific evidence for t ..read more
Visit website
Improve your sense of direction
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
4d ago
AUTOMATED VOICE: Continue on North Calvert Street for half a mile. LIMBONG: Because without it, not only would I be lost, I’d also feel lost, and I know I’m not the only one. MARY HEGARTY: One of the things we measure in our lab is whether people feel anxious if they suddenly find themselves lost or realize they’ve lost track of where they are. LIMBONG: That’s Mary Hegarty, a cognitive psychologist at the University of California, Santa Barbara. She leads the spatial thinking lab there, where they study how we see and interpret ourselves and other objects in space. And one of the things they s ..read more
Visit website
Why writing by hand beats typing for thinking and learning
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
5d ago
The laborious process of tracing out our thoughts, letter by letter, on the page is becoming a relic of the past in our screen-dominated world, where text messages and thumb-typed grocery lists have replaced handwritten letters and sticky notes. Electronic keyboards offer obvious efficiency benefits that have undoubtedly boosted our productivity — imagine having to write all your emails longhand. To keep up, many schools are introducing computers as early as preschool, meaning some kids may learn the basics of typing before writing by hand. … “Your fingers have to each do something different t ..read more
Visit website
Allergies or Sickness? Unraveling the Mystery of Concealing Infectious Diseases
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
5d ago
What do you think when people stay quiet about infectious situations? Is it just a small white lie?  In this episode, Under the Cortex hosts Wilson Merrell to discuss his new paper in Psychological Science titled “When and Why People Conceal Infectious Disease.” The conversation with APS’s Özge G. Fischer Baum reviews what disease concealment looks like and the factors that contribute to when people do it. Merrell highlights that 75% of US adult participants report concealing infectious illness from others and discusses the potential social pressures that might influence this decision.&nb ..read more
Visit website
Our Cognitive Bias Toward Novel, Negative Information May Make New Social Groups Seem Less Likeable
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
6d ago
People’s biases against the members of other groups are known to arise, at least in part, from self-serving motivational processes that allow us to justify competing for power and resources. Research in Psychological Science suggests that these biases may also have a cognitive basis owing to how we prioritize negative information when encountering new social groups.  This effect can lead people to overlook the positive attributes they may share with a new social group and focus on distinct negative attributes that differentiate them from the groups they have encountered before, said Johan ..read more
Visit website
New Research From Clinical Psychological Science
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
6d ago
Personality Pathology and Momentary Stress Processes Colin Vize, Aleksandra Kaurin, and Aidan Wright The expression of personality pathology differs between people and within a person in day-to-day life. Personality pathology may reflect, in part, dysregulation in basic behavioral processes. Thus, a useful approach for studying maladaptive trait expression comes from literature on stress and daily hassles, which provides dynamic accounts for the relations between individual differences and maladaptive dysregulation. In this study, we sought to integrate maladaptive traits and dynamic stress p ..read more
Visit website
Can scientists ‘solve’ stress? They’re trying.
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
1w ago
As modern-day stress ratchets up to what feels like unbearable levels, researchers are striving to learn more about the precise mechanisms through which it affects our body and mind. The hope is that by unlocking more about how stress works physiologically, we can find ways to prevent it from permanently harming people. … Katie McLaughlin, a psychologist at the University of Oregon, is investigating how mental health problems arise in adolescents as they’re going through a particularly vulnerable time in their lives, transitioning to adulthood. She and her colleagues are still collecting ..read more
Visit website
Scientists Look Beyond the WEIRD World of Happiness
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
1w ago
Quick Take People from WEIRD cultures tend to equate happiness with well-being, but people from collectivist or holistic cultures may place a higher value on meaning, spirituality, and social harmony.  WEIRD cultures often encourage people to pursue the maximum possible levels of happiness, freedom, and other positive states, possibly because historically benign ecological conditions made more resources available for personal pleasure.  People from more holistic cultures, which embrace continuous change and contradiction, tend to pursue a balance of positive and negative experienc ..read more
Visit website
Seifert Is the New Editor of PSPI
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
1w ago
Colleen M. Seifert APS Fellow Colleen M. Seifert, an expert on creative problem-solving at both the basic and applied levels, is the new editor of Psychological Science in the Public Interest (PSPI). She follows APS William James Fellow Nora Newcombe, who has served as editor of the journal since 2019.  Seifert is an Arthur F. Thurnau Professor of Psychology at the University of Michigan. Her research includes projects on divergent thinking and improvisation, learning through causal explanations, and memory and misinformation. She is the co-author of a 2012 issue of PSPI on misinformation ..read more
Visit website
Networking Inside and Outside the Academy
Association for Psychological Science
by APS Staff
1w ago
Professional networking can seem like a daunting endeavor for many young scientists and graduate students, especially those considering careers outside of academia. In an APS Professional Development webinar, five psychological scientists shared their own experiences and advice on expanding your relationships not only in academic circles, but in industry as well. Related content: Career Crossroads? How to Map Your Journey Beyond Academia Speakers in the webinar, “Conference Hints III: Networking Tips – Academia and Beyond,” discussed how to initiate conversations and build relationships at s ..read more
Visit website

Follow Association for Psychological Science on FeedSpot

Continue with Google
Continue with Apple
OR