Associations between gut microbiota characteristics and non‐motor symptoms following pharmacological and surgical treatments in Parkinson's disease patients
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Agnieszka Gorecka‐Mazur, Anna Krygowska‐Wajs, Agata Furgala, Jiaqi Li, Benjamin Misselwitz, Wojciech Pietraszko, Borys Kwinta, Bahtiyar Yilmaz
5d ago
Microbial community composition was significantly different in Parkinson's disease (PD) relative to controls. Progressive increases in levodopa were tied to altered microbiota profile in PD patients. Gastrointestinal microbiota composition differs between PD patients pharmacologically treated to those subthalamic nucleus subthalamic nucleus treated. Pharmacologically treated PD patients experienced higher rates of gastrointestinal dysfunction. Abstract Background The gut microbiota has been implicated in Parkinson's disease (PD), with alterations observed in microbial composition and reduced ..read more
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Ineffective esophageal motility is associated with diabetes mellitus end organ complications
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Serge Baroud, Anthony Kerbage, Amit Patel, Anthony Horton, Ariel Sims, Dhyanesh Patel, Kurren Mehta, Neil Kapil, Robert Kavitt, Vikram Rangan, Yue Yu, Fahmi Shibli, Gengqing Song, Ronnie Fass
5d ago
Diabetes Mellitus patients with neuropathy, retinopathy, or two or more comorbidities had lower DCI values compared to those without neuropathy, retinopathy, and less than two comorbidities. DCI values demonstrated a linear relationship with hemoglobin A1C, suggesting a link between glycemic control and esophageal motility. Abstract Background Diabetes Mellitus (DM) is known to induce a wide range of harmful effects on several organs, notably leading to ineffective esophageal motility (IEM). However, the relationship between DM and IEM is not fully elucidated. We aimed to determine the relat ..read more
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Low‐intensity pulsed ultrasound combined with ST36 modulate gastric smooth muscle contractile marker expression via RhoA/Rock and MALAT1/miR‐449a/DLL1 signaling in diabetic rats
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Nie Han, Shaodan Cheng, Ye Jin, Guanheng Li, Huan Wang, Lin Jin
5d ago
LIPUS at ST36 with an intensity of 0.88 W/cm2 exhibited significant differences in functional recovery of gastric motility in diabetic rats. The underlying mechanism may involve LIPUS modulating the expression of gastric smooth muscle contractile markers through the RhoA/ROCK and MALAT1/miR-449a/DLL1 signaling pathways. Abstract Background Low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) combined with acupoint can promote gastric motility of diabetic rats. The switch of gastric smooth muscle cell (GSMCs) phenotype was related to the diabetes-induced gastric dysfunction, but the mechanism is not clear ..read more
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Telehealth is effective for pelvic health physical therapy
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Elisa Karhu, Brooke Gurland, Julia Barten, Lucia Miller, Gloria Yi, Sa Shen, Leila Neshatian
5d ago
Utilizing telehealth by a skilled pelvic health physical therapist for treatment of pelvic floor disorders appears to be effective and may increase access to care. Moderate to significant improvement of symptoms with a hybrid pelvic health physical therapy program focused on behavioral intervention was reported by over 50% of patients. Abstract Background Telehealth utilization, largely spurred by the COVID-19 pandemic, has become popular due to convenience and access. We assessed the effectiveness of telehealth for delivering pelvic health physical therapy (PHPT) in patients with pelvic flo ..read more
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Enhancing Chicago Classification diagnoses with functional lumen imaging probe—mechanics (FLIP‐MECH)
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Sourav Halder, Jun Yamasaki, Xinyi Liu, Dustin A. Carlson, Wenjun Kou, Peter J. Kahrilas, John E. Pandolfino, Neelesh A. Patankar
1w ago
Esophageal motility disorders present a diagnostic challenge, as current methods such as high-resolution manometry (HRM) and the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) operate independently without a unified strategy to enhance diagnostic accuracy. This work provides a structured methodology leveraging deep learning and biomechanics to enhance the HRM-based Chicago Classification using FLIP measurements. Abstract Background Esophageal motility disorders can be diagnosed by either high-resolution manometry (HRM) or the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) but there is no systematic approach t ..read more
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A practical approach to ineffective esophageal motility
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Amrit K. Kamboj, David A. Katzka, Marcelo F. Vela, Rena Yadlapati, Karthik Ravi
2w ago
Abstract Background and Purpose Ineffective esophageal motility (IEM) is the most frequently diagnosed esophageal motility abnormality and characterized by diminished esophageal peristaltic vigor and frequent weak, absent, and/or fragmented peristalsis on high-resolution esophageal manometry. Despite its commonplace occurrence, this condition can often provoke uncertainty for both patients and clinicians. Although the diagnostic criteria used to define this condition has generally become more stringent over time, it is unclear whether the updated criteria result in a more precise clinical diag ..read more
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Extensive scintigraphic gastric motor function testing with concurrent symptom recording predicts prospectively measured daily dyspeptic symptoms
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Xiao Jing Wang, Michael O'Connor, Taylor Peck, Geoffrey Johnston, David O. Prichard
2w ago
A widely available, comprehensive, accurate and reliable evaluation of gastric sensorimotor function is required to further our understanding of the gastric pathophysiology underlying dyspeptic symptoms. The authors build on the work of others to concurrently evaluate emptying, motility, meal distribution and symptom response during gastric scintigraphy. Abstract Background Absent “organic” disease, dyspeptic symptoms may arise from abnormal gastric sensation, accommodation, motility or emptying (GE). Extensive gastric sensorimotor evaluation is rarely undertaken because testing is prolonged ..read more
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Critical appraisal of the SIBO hypothesis and breath testing: A clinical practice update endorsed by the European society of neurogastroenterology and motility (ESNM) and the American neurogastroenterology and motility society (ANMS)
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Purna Kashyap, Paul Moayyedi, Eamonn M. M. Quigley, Magnus Simren, Stephen Vanner
3w ago
Abstract Background There is compelling evidence that microbe-host interactions in the intestinal tract underlie many human disorders, including disorders of gut-brain interactions (previously termed functional bowel disorders), such as irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO) has been recognized for over a century in patients with predisposing conditions causing intestinal stasis, such as surgical alteration of the small bowel or chronic diseases, including scleroderma and is associated with diarrhea and signs of malabsorption. Over 20 years ago, it was hy ..read more
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Symptoms from the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index and clinical factors associated with delayed gastric emptying in patients with suspected gastroparesis
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Claire Sabat, Rachida Lebtahi, Henri Duboc, Marie Dior, Benoit Coffin, Heithem Soliman
3w ago
Tertiary care patients with upper gastrointestinal symptoms were more likely to have delayed gastric emptying when they had a higher weight loss, diabetes, previous surgery, or vomiting symptoms. The Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index score alone could not predict the result of the GE test. Abstract Background The association between upper gastrointestinal symptoms and delayed gastric emptying (GE) shows conflicting results. This study aimed to assess whether the symptoms of the Gastroparesis Cardinal Symptom Index (GCSI) and/or the scores were associated with the result of GE tests and wh ..read more
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Parkinson's disease is associated with low striated esophagus contractility potentially contributing to the development of dysphagia
Neurogastroenterology & Motility
by Alexander Kerschner, Hamza Hassan, Mark Kern, Francis Edeani, Ling Mei, Patrick Sanvanson, Reza Shaker, Elliot Yu
3w ago
Decreased striated esophagus contractility in Parkinson's disease patients may contribute to dysphagia, a prevalent lifestyle and morbidity concern in this patient population. Abstract Background Parkinson's disease (PD) is the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, and more than 80% of PD patients will develop oropharyngeal dysphagia. Despite its striated histology, proximity to airway, and potential negative impact of its dysfunction on bolus transport and airway safety, the contractile function of the striated esophagus in PD patients has not been systematically studied. Methods U ..read more
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