LGBT Terminology in Slavic languages (Aug 2021)
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
2M ago
After a short break, I am bringing you back the episode we talked about a lot back in 2021. Here, I explain the terminology used in Slavic languages in order to describe a gay person. This is a very sensitive topic and it's not meant to offend anyone. I would also like to state that I won't tolerate homophobic comments. Thank you! Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and comments can be sent to slavstvuyte@gmail.com ..read more
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Intro to West Slavic slang - Polish
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
4M ago
It's official - we've come to the end of our series on Slavic slang ? ❗DISCLAIMER: git actually comes from Yiddish, not English directly. However, they are all cognates. My mistake! This time, I discuss what slang actually reflects, how it helps youngsters express themselves, and what in the world does it means to release a peacock in Polish ? ? All that and more in the episode on Polish slang! Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All ..read more
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Intro to West Slavic slang - Czech
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
5M ago
So far, we’ve always discussed youngsters slang, but somehow I never mentioned any school-related vocabulary. This is all going to change in this episode on Czech slang! Learn what words like déčák or matikář mean in this episode of Slavstvuyte! ? Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and comments can be sent to slavstvuyte@gmail.com ..read more
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Intro to South Slavic slang - Macedonian
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
6M ago
The last out of South Slavic languages - Macedonian ?? ? Getting drunk like wood, slammed by love, or expressing your emotions through a simple "lele" - Macedonian slang has it all!  Ready, set and... ▶️ Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and comments can be sent to slavstvuyte@gmail.com ..read more
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Intro to South Slavic slang - Bulgarian
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
6M ago
Whether it's calling your friends your brother or loaning a word from Turkish to describe losing your virginity, Bulgarian slang won't fall short! ?? Join me in finding out what makes the vernacular of Bulgarian youngsters so special ? Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and comments can be sent to slavstvuyte@gmail.com ..read more
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Intro to South Slavic slang - BCMS
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
7M ago
In this episode, you`ll learn that in BCMS, you greet your friends with (g)de si? gdje si? đe si? đes'? (lit. meaning where are you?), call them your brother – brate, tebra, tebrice, or in Bosnia – jarane. You'll learn that you can also call them an old one – (you'll hear this in Belgrade for example) – matori; in other regions, you can say – stari (with the same meaning) Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and co ..read more
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Intro to BCMS slang
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
7M ago
In this episode, you`ll learn that in BCMS, you greet your friends with (g)de si? gdje si? đe si? đes'? (lit. meaning where are you?), call them your brother – brate, tebra, tebrice, or in Bosnia – jarane. You'll learn that you can also call them an old one – (you'll hear this in Belgrade for example) – matori; in other regions, you can say – stari (with the same meaning) Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and co ..read more
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Intro to South Slavic slang - Slovene
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
7M ago
One of the first things you will notice in Slovene slang is the amount of German words! English ones as well, but given its history, German was way more present throughout the lives of Slovenians than English. Those are the words that are not only to be heard from youngsters since they`ve been a part of the language for some time now. Words like ‘cajt’ (German = die Zeit – time), glih (German = gleich, right away, right now), plac (=der Platz – space, place) švicati (g. schwitzen – to sweat), pucati (g. putzen = to clean) are just some of many that you can hear every day. Support the show Su ..read more
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Intro to East Slavic slang
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
8M ago
In today’s episode, I am going to try and bring some Ukrainian & Russian slang to the table. It’s already August, and I imagine you’re somewhere on some beach, not ready to face reality, so that is why I’m not gonna bother you with aspect, conjugations, phonology, and all things we normally do on this podcast. Instead, just a little something to keep your day at the beach more interesting. Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquirie ..read more
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Expressing a prohibition - verbal aspect in negated imperative in East & West Slavic languages
Slavstvuyte!
by Dina Stankovic
9M ago
What is the difference between whether you are prohibiting someone from turning off the lights and telling them not to fall down?  In this episode of Slavstvuyte!, we are going to dive deeper into West & East Slavic languages and their preferences when it comes to verbal aspects when expressing negative imperative. Support the show Support Slavstvuyte through www.buymeacoffee.com/slavstvuyte Follow me on Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, and Linkedin. For additional information, go to www.slavstvuyte.org All inquiries, questions, and comments can be sent to slavstvuyte@gmail.com ..read more
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