In and out vs inside and outside
Word Reference » English Only
by goahead97
1h ago
Hello Question: Which sentence is the most idiomatic of the following two in American written English? - "Moving the furniture in and out of the room takes 1 minute." - "Moving the furniture inside and outside the room takes 1 minute." Thanks ..read more
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British people who...
Word Reference » English Only
by fabio407
1h ago
Hi, British people who eat more than 100g of chocolate per day on average are twice as likely to develop cancer. Click to expand... I was wondering whether the definite article ("the") is required in before "British people" in the sentence above, since the clause started by "who", not being preceded by a comma, is restrictive -- defines a specific group of British people based on their chocolate consumption --, so that it' would be important to clearly identify them as "the" specific group we're... Read more ..read more
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Each / both take one minute
Word Reference » English Only
by goahead97
1h ago
Example: "Moving the furniture in and out of the room both take 1 minute." I want to convey the meaning of option A below but I am not sure whether this example sentence conveys that meaning. I think it might also convey the meaning of option B. A) Moving the furniture in the room takes 1 minute and moving the furniture out of the room takes another minute. B) The whole process of moving the furniture in the room and then moving it back out of the room takes 1 minute... Read more ..read more
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Follow sth round
Word Reference » English Only
by Jamal.sh
1h ago
I'm reading When Marnie was there by Joan G. Robinson. “Don’t look down, then,” Anna said sharply. She got up and walked a few steps over to the wall, following it round with her hand, Anna and Marnie are on the second floor in a windmill. They climbed up the ladder through a hole in the second floor. now would you please tell me what "following it round with her hand" means? Does it mean moving forward by touching the wall? Thanks so much ..read more
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Brand awareness vs awareness of brand
Word Reference » English Only
by guniang
1h ago
Hello! Could anybody explain why English people say brand awareness / customer loyalty but not awareness of brand / loyalty of customer? Are there any rules for arranging 2 nouns in such a word pattern? Many thanks ..read more
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Saying… the takeaway?
Word Reference » English Only
by htart
3h ago
“Saying that he’s a good father isn’t the takeaway you should be getting from this.” Is the usage of the word takeaway here correct? Context: Someone read an article and their takeaway from it wasn’t the thing they should’ve focused on as it wasn’t the key fact in the article ..read more
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Definite article vs. zero article and restrictve vs. non-restrictive relative clauses
Word Reference » English Only
by fabio407
3h ago
Hi, British people who eat more than 100g of chocolate per day on average are twice as likely to develop cancer. Click to expand... I was wondering whether the definite article ("the") is required in before "British people" in the sentence above, since the clause started by "who", not being preceded by a comma, is restrictive -- defines a specific group of British people based on their chocolate consumption --, so that it' would be important to clearly identify them as "the" specific group we're... Read more ..read more
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Do we need sugar?
Word Reference » English Only
by Eien
3h ago
Hi, everyone Is there any difference between using "any" or omitting it in questions? For example, if two people are baking a cake together, are the two options below exactly the same? "Do we need any sugar?" "Do we need sugar?" Thanks ..read more
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Hit the audience
Word Reference » English Only
by MegaLan91
3h ago
Could you help me understand what the host says in the following link? Does he say, "hit the audience"? Norton and Hanks ..read more
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Mention of vs mention to
Word Reference » English Only
by goahead97
3h ago
Example: There is a grammar rule in the English language that says this: A sentence starts with a capital letter and ends with a period/full stop, a question mark or an exclamation mark. Option A) However, I did not find any mention of this grammar rule in the books I borrowed. Option B) However, I did not find any mention to this grammar rule in the books I borrowed. Is each option above as idiomatic as the other one? Thanks ..read more
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