'If You Can Keep It': The Michigan Primary Roundup
1A
by NPR
7h ago
There was a chance that this week's Michigan primaries would be a pair of sleeper contests. A sitting president and a former president are running in both races. They've each already racked up wins in other states by large or overwhelming margins. But Michigan has proven a bit more lively than expected. The media spotlight has been fixed on the perpetual swing state due to the still active, if lopsided, Republican primary. And on the Democratic side, President Joe Biden swept another contest. But the details are what matter. There were concerns that a protest vote against the president would ..read more
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Repairing America's Foreign Policy
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by NPR
1d ago
How has foreign policy changed since the presidency of Donald Trump? For decades, the U.S. aimed to create a more interconnected and globalized international landscape that would lift all boats, creating a more democratic world and a safer United States. But all of that changed in 2016. Donald Trump's presidency shook the very foundations of what the U.S. traditionally tried to achieve abroad. His administration pushed a populist agenda, strained alliances, and praised dictators. How is the Biden administration taking on the challenge of repairing international relations? We discuss that a ..read more
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Local News Is Dying: What's Killing It?
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by NPR
2d ago
Local newsrooms are struggling to stay alive. Major outlets, including public radio stations, continue to lay-off journalists. While some of those layoffs can be chalked up to the economic impact of the pandemic or private equity firms that buy and shut down newspapers – a lot of it is the online migration of advertising. But what it means for you is fewer reliable sources to tell you what's going on and why. Americans in "news deserts" tend to rely on social media to get the latest on their communities and beyond. But relying on social media for information can be less than awesome. We dis ..read more
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The News Roundup For February 23, 2024
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by NPR
4d ago
This week the Alabama Supreme Court ruled that embryos were children, establishing a legal precedent that will affect reproductive rights in the state. The court argued that the Wrongful Death of a Minor Act "applies to all children, born and unborn, without limitation." The Biden administration is weighing action to make it more difficult for migrants at the southern border to pass initial screenings for asylum and to make it easier for those who don't pass the screening to be deported. In election news, the Biden election campaign continued to amass cash. The president raised $42 million ..read more
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Ukraine Aid Is At A Standstill. What Does That Mean For The War?
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by NPR
5d ago
It's been nearly two years since Russia's full-scale invasion of Ukraine began. With Putin's forces making strategic gains in the eastern part of the country, there's increasing international pressure for the U.S. to step up its military aid. America has provided more than $47 billion in support to Ukraine since the war began. But a new package of aid is stalled in Congress. Last week, the Senate passed a foreign aid package that included $61 billion for Ukraine. That was blocked by the Republican-controlled House which insisted it include a border security package. So what does that mean ..read more
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The Art Of Doing Nothing
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by NPR
1w ago
Twiddling your thumbs is often associated with wasting time. But feel shame about thumb-twiddling no longer. In a world of calendars and to-do lists, something has got to give. We so often fear doing nothing, missing out, or getting behind. Our smartphones make it increasingly hard to disconnect from the attention economy. But studies show there are benefits to dilly-dallying when it comes to your work and your health. We'll discuss what it takes to reap the benefits of doing absolutely zilch on any given day. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adchoices NPR Priva ..read more
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A Brief History Of Eyeliner
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by NPR
1w ago
William Shakespeare once said that the eyes are the window to the soul. We make eye contact with others to show that we're listening, to connect, or simply as a way of saying, "I see you." Cultures around the world have understood the power of eyes for centuries. If you travel to India, Chad, Japan, Iran, or just around the corner from your house, you'll probably see the same thing around the eyes of the people who live there: eyeliner. In her new book, "Eyeliner: A Cultural History," Lebanese-British journalist Zahra Hankir explores beauty, power, identity, and resistance through the lens o ..read more
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The News Roundup For February 16, 2024
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by NPR
1w ago
It's been another busy week. Closed-door hearings in the case of the classified documents former President Donald Trump kept at his Mar-a-Lago estate began this week. U.S. District Judge Aileen Cannon first met with Trump's team and the special counsel's prosecutors on Monday. Meanwhile, America's political turmoil surrounding the 2024 presidential election is hot conversation at the Munich Security Conference. Former President Trump's remarks last week suggesting he wouldn't come to the aid of Europe in the event of a Russian invasion are causing concern among U.S, allies. Israel attacked ..read more
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The High-Carbon Lifestyles Of The Rich And Famous
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by NPR
1w ago
The 2024 Super Bowl was the most watched television event in history with over 123 million viewers. Many eyes watching were trained on Taylor Swift as she made the journey from Tokyo to Las Vegas in a highly scrutinized flight on a private jet. A total of 882 private planes flew into Las Vegas during and just before Super Bowl Sunday. One report found the world's richest 10 percent make up for 50 percent of the global emissions through investments, personal consumptions, and other means. Last week, Swift threatened legal action against a Florida student who's been tracking the jet travel o ..read more
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Love Languages And Other Relationship Myths, Debunked
1A
by NPR
2w ago
What's your love language? Acts of service, words of affirmation, physical touch, gifts, or quality time? The concept has been around since the early 1990s. Gary Chapman, a Baptist pastor, published a book in 1992 called, "The Five Love Languages: Secrets to Love That Lasts." But new research is debunking the popular love languages theory. And there's little evidence linking it to happier partnerships. For Valentine's Day, we speak with a researcher and relationship experts about what really makes for healthy relationships. Learn more about sponsor message choices: podcastchoices.com/adcho ..read more
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