How to Help the Environment Right Now Through Citizen Science
Nature's Good News
by Danielle Shaw
2y ago
  Getting involved in citizen science projects is not only a fun way to connect with nature and new people, but it also contributes to conservation efforts and can help us to cope with eco-anxiety. And the best part is that anyone and everyone can get involved! You don’t need any qualifications or experience, just an enthusiasm for nature and willingness to get stuck in and follow guidelines from academics or environmental organisations. You can take part solo or in a group, make it work around your schedule. and as there are countless projects to choose from it's easy to find the perfe ..read more
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Positive Environmental News: 7 Stories That Show Conservation Works
Nature's Good News
by Danielle Shaw
2y ago
Even though I know better, I have gotten back into the bad habit of disappearing down a rabbit hole of doomscrolling. It's known to leave us feeling overwhelmed and helpless, and also wastes energy that could be used to actually take action to help a cause. How doomscrolling makes me feel is one of the reasons that I started this blog in the first place, to encourage myself to look into success stories and remember that there are people making positive change around the world. And it actually helped! It's been a while since I shared a good news list, but this has been a much needed ..read more
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Positive Conservation News: 7 Recent Marine Success Stories
Nature's Good News
by Danielle Shaw
2y ago
  Beside the sea is my happy place, but it's been a while since I was last near the ocean and I'm missing the crashing sound of the waves and the salty, breezy air. So, I am taking us to the seaside for the latest instalment of positive environmental news. 1. This summer, Coquet Island's Roseate Terns population broke breeding records for the 6th year in a row! This year 150 pairs bred, up from 104 pairs in 2016 thanks to dedicated conservation efforts to save Britain's rarest nesting seabird. The island also saw a record breaking season for Common Terns and Kittiwakes. 2. It was ..read more
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Life as a Little Tern Night Warden
Nature's Good News
by Will Bevan
2y ago
I’m sat in a tent on the beach in East Norfolk, sitting comfortably but chilly in a fold out camping chair with some strong coffee, engrossed in a book. My watch says that 2 A.M. has just crept by, and the sounds of the night reach out to me in my reverie. Waves are crashing softly in the distance, and the tent flaps lazily in a gentle breeze. Sand hoppers - tiny crustaceans with springy tails - scale the walls, falling to the floor as they throw themselves at the solar powered light in a cyclical pilgrimage which will last until dawn. Wailing seals and the hoarse barking of a muntjac deer f ..read more
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Positive Environmental News: 10 Recent Conservation Success Stories
Nature's Good News
by Danielle Shaw
3y ago
  I've been feeling more overwhelmed than optimistic recently, and with what seems like a relentlessly harrowing news cycle, it's not difficult to see why. So, it seemed like a good time to actively seek out some positive news. Not to distract from the bad - it's important to know what is going on so we can support where we can - but to remember that there are still good, helpful people all around the world working hard to create a better future for people and the planet.  1. After disappearing centuries ago, wildcats are stalking the forests of the southern Netherlands ..read more
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Dogs and Wildlife – Building a ‘Pawsitive’ Relationship
Nature's Good News
by Will Bevan
3y ago
The UK is a nation of dog lovers, with an estimated 12 million pups in UK homes and a large increase in dog ownership since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic. We are also a nation of wildlife lovers, with the RSPB alone having over 1.1 million members, and many choosing to visit nature reserves and local wildlife sites in their free time. The two are by no means mutually exclusive, and dog ownership is a fantastic way to stay active, get outside, and appreciate the natural world. The RSPB encourages responsible dog walking on its nature reserves, and in the wider countryside, but what ..read more
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How Birds Use Our Waters – Part 3: The High Seas
Nature's Good News
by Will Bevan
3y ago
In this series, I have focused on birds as often overlooked inhabitants of the marine environment, heavily dependent on it as we are for food, the air we breathe, and the regulation of our climate. This time we complete our journey, finally arriving in the ‘High Seas’, the parts of our ocean beyond national jurisdiction which cover a staggering 50% of our planet’s surface area! Along the way we have discovered how a great wealth of bird species rely upon the UK’s coastlines and territorial waters all year round, including our overseas territories, and we have talked about how our coun ..read more
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Nature Nearby: Fighting for Equal Access to Nature
Nature's Good News
by Danielle Shaw
3y ago
Fresh air, sea-salty wind, crunchy leaves under wellies, green trees as far as the eye can see, sunsets and rises, the whoosh of the ocean - experiences in nature are good for the soul, and it's backed up by evidence!  The benefits we experience from spending time in nature are no secret, and I think many of us can appreciate them more than ever since our world got much, much smaller and quieter through the pandemic. Whether the reduced traffic meant we noticed the birds singing more, or extra time meant we spent longer exploring our local woodland, nature was there for us when we need ..read more
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How Birds Use Our Waters – Part 2: UK Territorial Waters
Nature's Good News
by Will Bevan
3y ago
  In Will's last blog post for UK Youth for Nature’s oceans campaign, he looked at how our coasts are crucial in supporting a huge diversity of bird species all year round. This time, he travels further out into our territorial waters, to see how the fate of the seabirds which call our shores home is inextricably tied to the health of our oceans. Click here to read the full article on the UK Youth for Nature website ..read more
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How Birds Use Our Waters – Part 1: Coastal Birds
Nature's Good News
by Will Bevan
3y ago
When thinking about animals which use the marine environment, birds might not be the first to come to mind. However, the UK is responsible for globally important numbers of birds which use our shores and seas in some way. As part of UK Youth for Nature’s oceans campaign, I’ll be journeying from our coastlines, into territorial waters, and finally beyond to the high seas, to show how birds rely on these environments, as well as the threats they face. For the first post in this three part series, I’ll be looking into the species which live along our shores. With over 31,000 kilometres of coas ..read more
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