The last Kletsheads [Season 3, Episode 8]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
8M ago
In this final – and therefore extra-long – episode, three parents who have previously been guests on the podcast talk about how their family’s bilingual journey has progressed since then. I look back over the past four years, reflect on the future and, to conclude, we hear a poem written about and dedicated to bilingual children, and inspired by the podcast. Our first guest is Liz. I first spoke to her in the first season of Kletsheads (in episode 4, about language mixing). Liz is originally from Limburg in the Netherlands but has lived in Canada for 10 years. Together with her Egyptian husban ..read more
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Bilingualism and dyslexia [Season 3, Episode 7]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
9M ago
Learning to read does not come easily to all children. Some children experience serious problems with reading and spelling. They have difficulty recognising and learning letters, they mix up sounds or letters, or read very slowly. With proper help, this often passes, but in some children these issues remain. Persistent problems with reading and spelling are sometimes due to dyslexia. What exactly is dyslexia? If a bilingual child has dyslexia, will they succeed in learning to read in both languages? Does dyslexia work the same in all languages, e.g. also in languages with different scripts? Wh ..read more
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The benefits of heritage language education (complementary schools) [Season 3, Episode 6]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
11M ago
Many bilingual children around the world attend heritage language education. Sometimes called complementary or supplementary schools, heritage language programs or mother tongue education, these schools offer children and young people a safe space where they can develop and maintain their HL and cultural identity. Classes take place at the weekend or after children are done for the day with their mainstream schooling, and in many cases include not only language but also a cultural and sometimes a religious component.   In this episode we hear more about the research on heritage language e ..read more
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Bilingualism and autism [Season 3, Episode 5]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Transcript According to WHO, 1 in 100 children have autism. Whilst exact numbers can vary depending on who’s reporting them, where in the world you live, and how autism is defined, this developmental disability is certainly not uncommon. In fact, in many places, the number of people living with autism is increasing. Autism is a spectrum which means that it’s different for everybody. It affects how people relate to others, how they make sense of the world around them, and how they communicate. And it’s likely these problems with communication that raise questions about bilingualism in autistic ..read more
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Books about bilingual parenting [Season 3, Episode 4]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Transcript In this episode we review two books about bilingual parenting: Bilingual success stories around the world by Adam Beck and Bilingual families. A practical language planning guide by Eowyn Crisfield. We get the parental perspective from Maria Papantoniou, a Greek-speaking mother raising her child bilingually in the UK together with her Greek-speaking husband, and Sam Timmermans, a Dutch-speaking father who until recently lived in the UK with his wife and two children. Language scientist Ludovica Serratrice joins me to evaluate the books from a research perspective. Ludovica is Prof ..read more
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Bilingualism and growing old: Can you lose a language?[Season 3, Episode 3]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Transcript If we are lucky, we will all grow old. And if we are even luckier, we will stay healthy for as long as possible. But even if we stay healthy, it is inevitable that we slow down — both physically and mentally. We often don’t function as well as we used to, we become forgetful, and we may also develop problems like dementia. Research shows that being bilingual might help when it comes to slowing down these kinds of problems. Why is this the case ? And does this apply to all bilinguals? Researcher Merel Keijzer explains how being bilingual can potentially help when it comes to slowing ..read more
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Multiple languages, multiple identities? Bilingualism and identity [Season 3, Episode 2]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Identity. It’s a word you often hear when talking about children growing up in a bilingual family, but what does identity really mean? To what extent can you have multiple identities, belonging to different cultures or ethnic backgrounds? What are the consequences for children if they identify more in one way than the other? What role do parents, friends, school and wider society have in play? In this episode, we’re answering these questions with Virginia Lam, researcher at Univeristy of Roehampton in London, herself a bilingual speaker of English and Mandaring and mother of two bilingual chil ..read more
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Why are some bilingual children more bilingual than others? [Season 3, Episode 1]
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Why do some bilingual children end up becoming more bilingual than others? That’s the question we’re answering in this episode of Kletsheads, the first in our third season of the English-language ediition. Most children become more proficient in one of their languages compared with the other(s). This is often the language spoken at school or the wider community. Some children actively use both languages, but many do not. And in much the same way as we see for learning to walk, or the age at which you lose your first tooth, we also see that some children are quicker to pick up their two languag ..read more
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Coming soon: Season 3
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
Kletsheads is back! Season 3 is on its way. We’ll have a new episode for you on the 15th of every month from now through November, eight episodes in total. In this short trailer, I’ll tell you more about what we’re going to be talking about. This season of Kletsheads was made possible thanks to funding from HaBilNet. The Harmonious Bilingualism Network HaBilNet aims to support and stimulate scientific research into harmonious bilingualism and to make sure the results of that research reach the general public. If you want to know more about this organisation, check out their website ..read more
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The best of ‘Kletshead of the week’
Kletsheads [English edition]
by Sharon Unsworth
1y ago
What do bilingual children think about being bilingual? Children – from 8 to 38 years old – talk about the fun and not so fun sides of being bilingual, their favourite words, the language they use with their pets, and what language they will speak when they become parents themselves. In the first two seasons of Kletsheads, I talked to children about what it is like to grow up with two or more languages, our Kletshead of the Week. In this special episode, I bring you the best of, a compilation of my favourite bits from ‘Kletshead of the Week’. Want to listen to the whole conversation with one o ..read more
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