Major James Francis Thomas
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2d ago
As the defence lawyer for Morant, Handcock and Whitton during the Boer War, the story of Major Thomas is often overshadowed by events of the Courts Marshall. As a prominent figure in the small rural town of Tenterfield, Thomas raised a contingent of mounted troops for service in South Africa and saw action on many battlefields, including The Siege of Elands River. The result of his service and the outcome of the Morant trial left Thomas a broken man, largely shunned by the community who once lauded him. Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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The Battle of Maryang San Part 3
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
With Hill 317 in the safe hands of 3RAR, all that remained was for the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers to take Hill 217 and 3RAR to take Sierra feature and The Hinge. The previous day's fighting had shown that Hill 217 would be a tough nut to crack and although the Fusiliers managed to seize the position, they were unable to hold onto it in the face of a massive Chinese counter-attack. The outcome of the battle would be determined by 3RAR. If successful, the entire Maryang San complex would be secured. Fail and the whole plan would need to be revised. The pressure was on Lt Col Hassett and his ..read more
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The Battle of Maryang San Part 2
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
With Hill 355 secured, the focus of the fighting turned to the main objective, Hill 317 and its neigbouring feature Hill 217. 3RAR would make the assault on Hill 317 while the Northumberland Fusiliers attempted to take Hill 217. In order to take Hill 317, 3RAR first had to secure features known as Tango, Uniform and Qubec. The fighting to take these features would test the strength of 3RAR, severely reducing their numbers before they could make the main attack and seize Maryang San. https://www.australianmilitaryhistorypodcast.com/ Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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The Battle of Maryang San Part 1
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
In 1951 the combatant nations of the Korean War had finally come to the negotiating table, raising hopes that the Korean War would soon be over. But when negotiations broke down, the troops went back to fighting. General Van Fleet wanted the UN troops to advance and push the Chinese troops back. US troops pushed forward at Punchbowl, and shortly thereafter the 1st Commonwealth Division, including the 3rd Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (3RAR) launched its attack on the Maryang San complex. The first phase involved the attack on Hill 355 by the Kings Own Scottish Borderers and the Shropsh ..read more
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Damien Parer
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
When the Second AIF headed to war, a little known photographer named Damien Parer was with them. Having made a reputation in the fledgling Australian film industry, Parer was selected as an official war photographer for the Department of Information. He would go on to record many of the iconic images of Australian troops in that war. But the bureaucracy of the DoI would eventually see Parer resign and take up a role with Paramount News, a move which would bring about his untimely death on the island of Peleliu. https://www.australianmilitaryhistorypodcast.com/episodes Hosted on Acast. See ac ..read more
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The Fall of Rabaul Part 2
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
With the port town of Rabaul captured by the Japanese, the men of Lark Force began their retreat. Two main escape routes developed, one to the north and the other to the south. All of the survivors experienced hardships over the coming weeks. Those who went north and came under the energetic leadership of Lt Appel were the lucky ones, being evacuated after only a few weeks. Those who headed south faced a much tougher trek, with some destined to fall victim to Japanese atrocities at the Tol Plantation. Warning - contains description of the massacre at Tol. https://www.australianmilitaryhistor ..read more
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A quick one.
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
If you would like to support the petition to erect a memorial to the Coastwatchers at Hamilton on the Brisbane River, please follow this link. https://www.epetitions.brisbane.qld.gov.au/petition/view/pid/1246 Cheers Warwick Hosted on Acast. See acast.com/privacy for more information ..read more
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The Fall of Rabaul Part 1
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
The war in Europe seemed a long way off for the inhabitants of New Britain and there was no real urgency from the Australian Chiefs of Staff to secure this vital island. A token force was sent to Rabaul to observe any movement and to report back to Army HQ. But in December 1941, Japanese forces bombed Pearl Harbor and began their conquest of the Pacific. Rabaul was now under threat, but you wouldn't know it. The Defence Chiefs decided not to reinforce Lark Force, or even provide them with adequate resources to defend the port town. Lark Force commander, Colonel Scanlan, had not even made plans ..read more
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The August 1915 Offensive Part 3
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
By the morning of the 7th August 1915, British troops were landing at Suvla Bay, , the left assaulting column was taking off for its part in proceedings, New Zealand Troops were waiting to attack Chunuk Bair and men of the Australian Lighthorse were preparing to charge at The Nek. This day would be one of farce and heartbreaking tragedy. The Commander of the Suvla Landing would start the day with a satisfying snooze while his troops foundered onshore and the left assaulting column would follow a guide on a short cut that ended up adding three hours to the advance and getting the troops lost. A ..read more
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The August 1915 Offensive Part 2
Australian Military History
by Warwick O'Neill
2M ago
With all the planning in place, it was time to put it all into action. Starting with a diversionary attack from Tasmania Post, the Allied attempt to break out from the Anzac Beachhead began. In the afternoon of 6th of August, the Australians charged forward at Lone Pine, initiating what would become five days of brutal fighting. As darkness fell, the main assault headed off for its attack on Chunuk Bair. Timing was crucial. Chunuk Bair had to be taken before dawn, but a series of delays, navigational errors and command failure, saw the New Zealanders waiting at the edge of their objective, wit ..read more
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