Masked, Alone, and in the Dark
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
2d ago
Today's post is by Nuria Gardia, a Mental Health Master’s student at University of Birmingham with a newly discovered passion for Philosophy. Her interests lay in the intersection between philosophy and psychology to better understand how the mind “overcomes” trauma and the relationships between mind-body and self-world. Specifically, how trauma affects human experience and thus, human reality.  This is part of a series of posts by students of the Philosophy and Ethics of Mental Health and Wellbeing module at the Institute for Mental Health. They share some of their views on key topics d ..read more
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Responsibility and Blame in Practice
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
1w ago
Today's post is by Jen Garbett, a part-time Mental Health MSc student at the University of Birmingham. Jen is interested in all aspects of mental health in psychology, especially in moral responsibility in psychopathy and the nature of delusions in psychosis and other psychiatric disorders.  This is part of a series of posts by students of the Philosophy and Ethics of Mental Health and Wellbeing module at the Institute for Mental Health. They share some of their views on key topics discussed in the module. Jen Garbett The concepts of responsibility and blame naturally go ha ..read more
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Rethinking Conspiracy Theories
Imperfect Cognitions
by Kiichi Inarimori
2w ago
Today's post is by Matthew Shields at University College Dublinon on his recent paper “Rethinking Conspiracy Theories” in Synthese.  Matthew Shields What do you think of when you think of conspiracy theories and conspiracy theorists? The first image that typically comes to mind are individuals on dark corners of the internet spinning bizarre tales to explain some major event: that the moon landing was faked, that 9/11 was an “inside job”, that Sandy Hook was a false flag, or that Princess Diana was assassinated. You’re in good company: a great deal of the academic research ..read more
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Participatory Interactive Objectivity in Psychiatry
Imperfect Cognitions
by Kiichi Inarimori
3w ago
Today's post is by Şerife Tekin at University of Texas at San Antonio on her recent paper “Participatory Interactive Objectivity in Psychiatry” in  Philosophy of Science.  Şerife Tekin  As evident from the compelling body of scholarship featured in the Imperfect Cognitions blog, the last decade has been a very exciting time to be doing philosophy of psychiatry. What has been even more exciting for me, as a philosopher who has long been promoting the view that giving uptake to the first-person perspectives and testimonies of individuals diagnosed with mental di ..read more
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Renewing Phenomenological Psychopathology: The Launch
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
1M ago
This post is by Lucienne Spencer (University of Birmingham). In this post she is reporting on the launch of a new project, Renewing Phenomenological Psychopathology. The project aims to apply interdisciplinary approaches to phenomenological psychopathology and diversify the field more broadly. It is funded by a Wellcome Trust International Exchange Award and will run from April 2022 to April 2024. The project leads are Matthew Broome and Giovanni Stanghellini. Lucienne Spencer is the post-doctoral researcher on the project, and Roxana Baiasu is research fellow and network convener.  ..read more
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Philosophical Perspectives on Memory and Imagination
Imperfect Cognitions
by Kiichi Inarimori
1M ago
This post is by Anja Berninger (University of Göttingen) and Íngrid Vendrell Ferran (University of Marburg). Today their post is on the edited volume Philosophical Perspectives on Memory and Imagination (Routledge 2022). Íngrid Vendrell Ferran Having been neglected for many years, the subjects of memory and imagination have started to gain more attention in recent philosophical debates. While there has been some interaction between philosophers working in these different fields (for publications that make significant headway towards establishing a more integrative perspective, see, fo ..read more
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Bipolar Autonomy: Excellent Agency and Marginal Agency
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
1M ago
This post is by Elliot Porter. Elliot is a lecturer in bioethics at Brighton and Sussex Medical School, and is finishing his PhD at the University of Kent. His research focuses on personal autonomy and mental disorder.  His research involves themes in metaethics, moral epistemology, and epistemic justice. Elliot Porter We have largely, but not entirely, moved past the intuition that significant mental disorder constitutes, ipso facto, an injury to an agent’s autonomy. Part of this shift stems from increasingly multidimensional approaches to autonomy that allow us to track, in ..read more
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Emotions, Cognition, and Behaviour
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
1M ago
Emotions Brain Forum BrainCircle Italia and BrainCircle Lugano organised a series of events where women scientists presented their work on emotions in various cities from October 2021 to November 2022 (see full itinerary). The initiative, conceived by Viviana Kasam, was inspired by the work of Nobel Prize winner Rita Levi Montalcini who promoted the work of scientists worldwide and was interested in highlighting research on the brain.  Campus Biotech The last stop of the itinerary was Geneva, where on 25th November 2022 the Emotions Forum featured an interdisciplinar ..read more
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Educating Character through the Arts
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
2M ago
In this post, Laura D'Olimpio (University of Birmingham) asks whether we can educate for good character by drawing upon the arts, presenting a new book co-edited with Panos Paris and Aidan Thompson and entitled Educating Character Through the Arts (Routledge 2022). Laura D'Olimpio Can we learn, morally, from artworks? Is it possible that the various multiple arts may shed light on what it means to be human and help us come to better understand what we mean by ‘good character’? How might one distinguish morally insightful from morally dubious art? And might we be able to cultivate virt ..read more
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Why are you talking to yourself?
Imperfect Cognitions
by Lisa Bortolotti
2M ago
Today's post is by Elmar Unnsteinsson (University College Dublin). Here Unnsteinsson asks why we talk to ourselves. The other day I saw someone enjoying a walk while deeply engaged in conversation but I couldn’t see the other person. The ledge between us was too high. When I turned the corner I saw that the person was alone and actually talking to no one. Well, no one else I should say. It’s unremarkable that I had assumed that there was a pair of people, dancing conversational tango, but, it does raise the question why we think of conversation as, essentially, a multi-playe ..read more
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