Are you advocating to lower fossil fuels? How about that bouquet?
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
1w ago
In this series of articles, I am not really weighing in on arguments about fossil fuels and peak oil.  My lifestyle in a remote Alaska cabin says enough about how my husband and I have decided to live.  I do want to encourage those who advocate against fossil fuel use and investment, those who are, by definition, telling other people what to do, to EXAMINE THEIR OWN CHOICES and ACTIONS FIRST.  The easiest way to crater an advocacy group is to document a lack of integrity.  Hypocrisy is another word for that. I hear a lot of “talk the talk.” I see less of “walk the walk.” So ..read more
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Are You Advocating against Fossil Fuels? What is the Elephant in the Room? The Room Itself.
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
1w ago
  When conscientious people gather to discuss carbon foot print topics and advocate to reduce fossil fuel usage, the elephant in the room may be… the room itself.  Look around.  What is the room made of? Although the carbon footprint of operational aspects of buildings, like lighting, heating, cooling, and cooking have been widely discussed, has your group discussed the structural elements themselves?  According to the UN’s environmental website (UNEP.org) and the BBC.com, the global construction industry accounts for a whopping 37% of greenhouse gases, 33% of global waste ..read more
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Despite Two Feet of Snow, Spring has Sprung
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
1M ago
Although our land is still blanketed by 2 feet of snow and the lake remains frozen, spring has sprung this week.  How do I know? One clue is the first of many flocks of migrating geese and one, lone sandhill crane (where is its mate?) announcing their annual return to The Great Land.  Welcome back!  I have missed you! Birch Sapping in Spring A second is that twice a day, my husband and I stomp through softening snow to collect sap from the birch trees we tapped on April 20.  We drink this bracingly cold liquid as a vitamin rich spring tonic, and use it instead o ..read more
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Moving Content to Substack
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
4M ago
 Dear Readers, Thank you for your visits here, especially those of you who wrote me with comments or questions through the blog or through my email. I am migrating now to substack.  All future content will appear at: https://alaskauu1.substack.com. Blogspot was a wonderful platform but substack has added advantages for both writers and readers that, to my knowledge, blogspot lacks. My newest post is about Trash in America, and easy, creative, and money saving ways to reduce yours or mine. Happy reading.  I look forward to hearing from you there. Laura ..read more
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My Recent Survivalblog Posts
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
4M ago
 Please follow these links for articles recently posted on Survivalblog.com:   Homesteading Cautionary Tales – Part 1, by Mrs. Alaska   Homesteading Cautionary Tales – Part 2, by Mrs. Alaska ..read more
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How to Make Berry Wine (from fresh, frozen, or canned fruit)
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
5M ago
For a dozen or so years, I have made palatable wine (usually pinot noir and pinot grigio) from commercial kits that vary in price from $69 - $200 per 6 gallons.  To some, I added fresh berries that we grow at home.  I have also made 4 batches of mead with the honey that our honeybees produced.  One batch of raspberry mead was glorious, but three others failed to ferment, so I ended up with three gallons of raspberry/honey syrup – more than anyone needs. Last month, inspired by a friend who makes about 10 types of wine from apricot and wild plum trees, dandelion flowers, and fi ..read more
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Ways to Save Eggs for Months
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
5M ago
Egg laying is partially predicated on the season.  Our hens, of various breeds, are always most prolific layers in the summer months.  In the autumn, when they molt (shed their feathers and grow new ones) they do not lay at all for 6 to 8 weeks.  During the cold winter months in Alaska, they shiver in the chilly coop, laying maybe half as often as in the summer.  It is only in March, when we have 12 hours of daylight, that they venture out into the snow and start to lay regularly again. Therefore, I learned various ways to save eggs to eat during the molt and all winter ..read more
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Radical Life Change- From Southern City to Rural Alaska
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
8M ago
About 15 years ago, my husband and I embarked on a radical shift in our lifestyle.   We moved from a high-rise urban condo in Houston, TX to a 2 room log cabin in Alaska… with an outhouse. Because there are no roads where we live, we sold our Mercedes and Honda and bought snowmachines (called snowmobiles in the Lower 48) to travel 3.5 hours to the closest community, and a plane, with floats and skis, to fly there in 20 minutes.  However, twice a year, when the lake transitions from water to ice, we have no transportation at all. Instead of weekly trips to the supermarket and resta ..read more
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How to Build an Outhouse
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
9M ago
 Please find my most recent post here, about how to build an outhouse .  https://survivalblog.com/2023/10/01/build-outhouse-mrs-alaska/    The following photos are of our two outhouses.  The one with the moon and moose paddle door handle is the new one.   The other one was built in about 2009.  I am honored to have it featured on SurvivalBlog.com, which, every day, offers informative articles of interest to people who want to live intentionally, and self-reliantly.  It includes product reviews, recipes, historical anecdotes, snippets of news from the R ..read more
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Bountiful Berry Harvest in Alaska + Recipe for BBQ sauce with berries
Alaska Bush Life, Off-Road, Off-Grid
by Laura Emerson
10M ago
Sadly, 2023 was “the summer that wasn’t.” In fact, local weather reporters said that this has been the coolest summer since 2008.  The temperature was not as much of a problem as all the rainy and overcast days. I think the longest stretch of consecutive, sunny days was 4, and those were few and far between.    For someone who tries to raise a lot of our own food, this was a sad state of affairs. My vegetable gardens were pretty much useless.  Seeds, seedlings, and bulbs rotted in the ground, and those that grew were leggy and thin.  Cauliflower and broccoli never set ..read more
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