‘Made in China’ as Possible Supply Chain Money Laundering
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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5d ago
It is estimated that 30% of the world’s production of cotton originates in China. Of that cotton 85% originates in Xinjiang, which is the centre of the Uyghur atrocities. Recently before the High Court, the World Uyghur Congress (“the WUC”) argued that UK authorities were under a duty to block and/or launch money laundering investigations into the many imports of Xinjiang cotton brought into the UK - many by household names in the clothing industry – because of the high likelihood of prison and forced labour forming the start of the supply chain ..read more
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Case note – the appropriate venue for bringing a judicial review claim
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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6d ago
CPR PD 54C - Administrative Court (Venue) provides that, save in relation to a small number of excepted claims, judicial review claims “should be commenced at the Administrative Court office for the region with which the claim is most closely connected” and that “the proceedings may either on the application of a party or by the Court acting at its own initiative, be transferred from the Administrative Court Office at which the Claim Form was issued to another Office. Such transfer is a judicial act” (paragraphs 2.1 and 2.3 ..read more
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Gender recognition and the risk of encouraging a constitutional crisis
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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2w ago
This week it was announced that the UK Government has blocked the Gender Recognition Reform (Scotland) Bill (“the Bill”) from receiving Royal Assent by invoking its powers under section 35 of the Scotland Act 1998. As well as causing disappointment and heart ache for trans people and allies who had welcomed the Bill, some say it also risks encouraging a constitutional crisis. But why is the bill so controversial and what is section 35 ..read more
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The Covid-19 Inquiry – How Might You Get Involved?
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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3w ago
The UK-wide public inquiry into the handling of the Covid-19 pandemic is now getting into gear and it is expected to begin hearing evidence this summer. The inquiry is an important opportunity to secure political accountability and useful and timely recommendations for the future. Covid-19 has affected all of us, so the inquiry is likely to be especially long running and wide ranging. There will be a particular focus on the health and care sector, so readers of ‘The Carer’ may well have a role to play ..read more
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Prince Harry Going to Court and Five other Public Law Developments to Look Out for in 2023
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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3w ago
Six Public Law developments to look out for in 2023, including - The Prince Harry JR, Covid-19 Inquiry, Brexit, The Bill of Rights Bill, Rwanda Flights Litigation and the Russian Sanctions Litigation ..read more
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No time to waste in safeguarding children online
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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3M ago
As the government tweaks the Online Safety Bill, Emily carter highlights the importance of making progress in the New Law Journal ..read more
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How to get your voice heard in the Covid-19 inquiry
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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4M ago
The first preliminary hearing for module 1 of the Covid-19 Inquiry on 4th October is a powerful reminder that it is more vital than ever that those who may be called to participate (or who have valuable perspectives to contribute) are prepared for what lies ahead.   ..read more
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Case Note – Judicial Review of Covid-19 care home policy: Gardner & Harris v Secretary of State for Health and Social Care & Ors [2022] EWHC 967 (Admin)
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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7M ago
After over two long years of life under the shadow of the Covid-19 pandemic, we can circle back and reflect on our colleague, Sophie Kemp’s predictions in relation to ‘the future public inquiry into Covid-19’ in the light of the High Court judgment Gardner & Harris v Secretary of State for Health and Social Care & Ors [2022] EWHC 967 (Admin ..read more
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Case note – CPR Part 18 Requests for Further Information in judicial review proceedings: R (KBL) v Secretary of State for the Home Department and ors [2022] EWHC 1545 (Admin) and R (JZ) V Secretary of State for the Home Department and ors [2022] EWHC 1708
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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7M ago
CPR Part 18 gives power to the court to order a party to proceedings to provide further information, where this is necessary to resolve disputes. Applications for orders under CPR18 are very rare in judicial review cases but two recent decisions of the Administrative Court illustrate the kind of circumstances in which orders will be made; and also, strikingly, that an order can be made at the conclusion of a substantive hearing ..read more
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Technology & the criminal justice system
Kingsley Napley | Public Law Blog
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7M ago
Fred Allen explains why taking a critical approach to emerging technologies is vital ..read more
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