From the Commonplace Book to the Scrapbook
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
7M ago
Excerpt of Eliza Schuyler Hamilton's commonplace book.  Did you know that the first Saturday in May is National Scrapbook Day? Although the term “scrapbook” wasn’t used until the mid to late-1800s, the concept has existed for centuries. Popularized in the 15th century with the advent of the printing press, people have been using what were called “commonplace books” to compile documents such as recipes, letters, poems, and journal entries. Even as early as the 8th century, these types of books were used to compile biblical texts, and the concept of these books as a form of persona ..read more
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Poets of the Schuylers' Time: A National Poetry Month Recap
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
7M ago
Phillis Wheatley, possibly by Scipio Moorhead; circa 1773 In April we introduced you to poets from around the world who lived during the 18th and early 19th centuries! Here’s a recap, in order of the poets’ births, in case you missed out on a post. JUPITER HAMMON Jupiter Hammon was born into slavery in 1711, on Henry Lloyd’s estate on Long Island, New York. Though the details are unknown, he was educated by the Lloyds. As an adult, he worked with Henry on his business, often going to New York City to negotiate trade deals. Hammon may have served in a similar role to Prince, a man ens ..read more
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The Hamilton Sisters: Women's History Month 2023 in Review
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
8M ago
Mary Morris Hamilton, circa 1870s. The following blog post is a compilation from our 2023 Women’s History Month social media posts. Enjoy! When researching women’s history, there can be a lot of missing information. That’s why it was so exciting to receive about 20 letters from 1830-1835 that show in detail the lives of five siblings—four sisters & one brother—great-grandchildren of the Schuylers. Reading the letters is like taking a deep-dive into their world: the trips between their home in Manhattan and their other in Westchester, their brother constantly asking for updates fro ..read more
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Philip Schuyler, the Albany Avenger
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
8M ago
It’s that time of year again, when we post our annual April Fools article. In past years, every effort has been made to make these seem strange stories that like they really shouldn’t be true, but where everything seems to line up in a believable enough way. As much fun as that is, it can cause problems from time to time, such as when one reader prepared Philip Schuyler’s “recipe” for bacon-wrapped eels on the grill- a reference that we made up (at least they were tasty!) This year we’ve decided to take a subtly different tack: The following is not history. At all. Occasionally we may include ..read more
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"the orphan Antle:" The Story of Fanny Antill
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
9M ago
Fanny Antil's gravetone.     We’re celebrating Women’s History Month by sharing a few stories of women close to the Schuyler family. One of the more unique stories is that of Frances “Fanny” Antill, a young girl adopted by the Hamiltons in 1787. Fanny was born in 1785 to Charlotte Riverin (1752-1785) and Edward Antill (1742-1789) on Long Island. Edward received his law degree from King’s College (now Columbia University) in 1762, and moved to Quebec shortly thereafter. Her mother was descended from a long line of wealthy merchants from Brittany, who emigrated to Quebec ..read more
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Peruvian Bark and Turlington's Balsam: Uncovering the Medical History of the Enslaved at Schuyler Mansion
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
10M ago
Dr. Samuel Stringer On a bitterly cold February day in 1776, a man named Prince sat in a freezing cell in Albany, preparing a letter to Catharine Schuyler as frostbite gnawed at his feet. In this letter, Prince described his situation, reporting that he had “quite lost the use of my limbs with cold” after a forced march from Canada over the preceding winter. Prince was eventually purchased by the Schuyler family, but staff at Schuyler Mansion have often wondered about the long-term impact of that winter imprisonment on Prince’s health. Was he fortunate enough to make a full recovery ..read more
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Resources for Albany's 18th and Early 19th Century Black History
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
10M ago
A painting of early Albany by James Eights.  The woman is thought to be  Diannah Jackson. While we are committed to interpreting Black history as an essential part of our nation’s past, present, and future every month of the year, Black History Month is a time to acknowledge and celebrate the stories of people of African descent in our history. As an 18th century historic site and former home of one of the largest slave-holding families in the region, Black History at Schuyler Mansion is often inextricably intertwined with the history of slavery and enslavement. Betwe ..read more
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Holidays in Colonial New York
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
11M ago
There are well over a dozen holidays celebrated between December and January worldwide, but if we were to time-travel to colonial Albany, what festivities might we partake in? Well, that depends on who you were celebrating with! In the 17th and 18th centuries, this region was home to a multitude of national, cultural, and spiritual holiday traditions. In December, people of the Six Nations of the Haudenosaunee celebrated the End of Seasons and prepared for the Midwinter Rites in January- a time for renewing the relationships and responsibilities with their communities and with the earth as th ..read more
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“Letter by Jim"
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
11M ago
        In 1800, there were two men with the same last name living in Easton, NY: Rensselaer Schuyler, Philip Schuyler’s youngest son, and Jim Schuyler, the head of a free Black household. Easton is located in Washington County, northeast of Albany across the Hudson River. Rensselaer lived in Easton for at least a decade in the early 19th century, as he was listed on the census there in both 1800 and 1810.[1] [2] He owned a large parcel of land in Washington County that had once belonged to his father and rented it out to tenant farmers, just as the elder Schuy ..read more
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"Remember Thee"
Schuyler Mansion State Historic Site
by Schuyler Mansion
1y ago
Historians spend a lot of time researching, reading, and looking for anything of historical significance, but sometimes, history finds you. Grouped together with documents and letters regarding Louisa Lee and Georgina Schuyler, was a common place book, a handmade collection of literature and quotes that were important to the creator of the book, that belonged to their mother, Eliza Hamilton Schuyler (1811-1863), the granddaughter of Alexander (~1755-1804) and Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton (1757-1854).   The first few pages of the commonplace book contain a set of four poems. The poems were addr ..read more
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