Managing Care of Elderly Pets (Archive from Aug. 6, 2021)
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
3w ago
Similar to people, pets are living longer lives these days due to improved veterinary care and dietary habits. But with extended lives comes a whole new set of age-related conditions, which in turn affects the care needs of these “pet elders” – our beloved senior pets. This show’s guest, Dr. Amy Stone, who heads the primary care and dentistry service at UF, will discuss some of the common conditions that affect older pets, which are among the same problems that affect older people: cancer, heart disease, diabetes, kidney/urinary tract disease, senility, among others. She’ll also talk about how ..read more
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Helping Florida’s Marine Mammals: It Takes a Village
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales
1M ago
When Florida’s marine mammals and sea turtles become sick, injured or die, a quick response is essential to understand the issues at play and, if needed, provide a means for care and treatment. At the University of Florida, the Marine Animal Rescue Program plays that role, working closely with other stranding networks within the state of Florida and nationally when needed. On this show, Dr. Mike Walsh, a clinical associate professor at UF and the program’s director, will discuss some of the program’s accomplishments since its inception, including the recovery of a deceased dolphin and the ..read more
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Leprosy and Armadillos: Should You Be Concerned?
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales
1M ago
Armadillos are the only known animal to carry leprosy in the Americas. Seen everywhere in Florida, these animals often look for insects to eat by digging in flowerbed, then resting in a burrow. Although there have been reports of people becoming infected with leprosy after coming into contact with armadillos, the details of these encounters are unclear. On this show, Dr. Juan Campos Krauer, an assistant professor and extension veterinarian, will discuss armadillo habits and the potential for human interaction, and why while caution is called for, the threat of infection by ..read more
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What to Consider Before Bringing a New Pet Home
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales
1M ago
The decision to bring a new pet into your household is a big one, and not to be taken lightly. Whether you’re considering a cat, a dog, or some other species, you’ll want to be sure your lifestyle is conducive to meeting the pet’s needs. You should also prepare to make some adjustments in your environment, schedule and finances; it’s important that the pet’s needs be met, but to do so you also need to be able to cover the expenses of responsible pet ownership, from food to veterinary care when needed. On this show, Dr. Wendy Mandese, a primary care and dentistry veterinarian, will cover what y ..read more
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Protecting your dog against canine distemper
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
Canine distemper — a viral infection that’s often deadly in dogs—is surging in some parts of the country. Here’s how to keep your pooch safe. First and foremost, stay up to date with your dog’s vaccinations. The canine distemper vaccine is super effective, but dogs need periodic boosters to maintain strong immunity. Infection is transmitted through respiratory droplets from other dogs as well as raccoons — and sometimes foxes and skunks. Contaminated objects can also spread the virus, so keep food and water sources away from wildlife and other dogs. You can also help by reporting raccoons that ..read more
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Veterinary forensics helps to identify animal abuse and crimes against wildlife
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
Veterinary forensic pathologists are using some pretty sophisticated tools to  pinpoint animal abuse and crack crimes against wildlife. Good intentions are golden, but hard evidence wins court cases. Just as in human forensics, veterinary evidence can now be collected through imaging, genealogy, microscopic evaluation of dissections, DNA analysis — even 3D-printed models. Artificial intelligence may increasingly play a role as well — in helping to identify patterns of trauma or disease. In addition to detailed evidence, collaboration with law enforcement, animal control and Fish and Wildl ..read more
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U.S. SHIP: a program to help protect hogs in the face of disease outbreaks
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
Every day, swine producers across the United States are working diligently to fend off dangerous diseases — like African swine fever and brucellosis—that could shut down hog facilities. That’s why the US Department of Agriculture developed the US Swine Health Improvement Plan — or U.S. SHIP — to help protect hogs and US trade in the event of disease outbreaks. The program is based on biosecurity, disease surveillance and testing to help confine diseases that make their way into individual facilities. That way, effects on international trade could be mitigated while getting the disease under co ..read more
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Knowing about toxic household products can keep your pet safe
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
All animals can be affected by toxins in household products — just in different ways. Dogs like to chew on things like detergent pods, while cats tend to groom substances off their fur. Birds are especially sensitive to airborne toxins, while amphibians absorb toxins through their skin. Toxicity is often directly related to the concentration of chemicals. Multipurpose cleaners are usually pretty dilute, whereas corrosive products—like oven cleaners — are much more concentrated. Products that are very acidic or alkaline are also more caustic. Make sure to store household products safely and use ..read more
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Dealing with skunk spray
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
As the weather warms, skunks become more active — and more of a problem for pets. A direct skunk spray to the face can irritate a pet’s eyes — and if ingested, can cause drooling, nausea and vomiting. And of course there’s the smell. The offending thiols [THIGH-alls] in skunk spray aren’t water soluble, so bathing your pet with soap and water won’t help. One effective recipe adds one quart of 3% hydrogen peroxide to one-quarter cup baking soda, then mixes in two teaspoons of liquid dish detergent. When the mixture bubbles, lather it on, avoiding your pet’s eyes. Let it sit for five minutes bef ..read more
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Rabbits: pets with big paws but small carbon footprints
Animal Airwaves
by Carlos Morales, UF Health
1M ago
Did you know that the most common pets have outsized carbon footprints? That’s due to the carnivorous diet we feed dogs and cats. If you’re looking for a more environmentally friendly pet, you might want to take a look at rabbits. These guys thrive on a diet of hay supplemented with veggies and leafy greens — no meat for them! They even go for the parts we toss away—like stems and carrot greens — which you might be able to get for free at your grocery store. What’s more, a rabbit’s droppings can be composted or used as garden fertilizer. That’s not the case with cats and dogs. But before you b ..read more
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