Mistakenly believe them to be who they are
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
According to Buddhist teachings, the attachment to the five aggregates (form, feeling, perception, mental formations, and consciousness) and the identification with the six senses (sight, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and mind/manas) is considered a fundamental cause of suffering. The Buddha emphasized the impermanent and conditioned nature of these aggregates and senses. He taught that clinging to them as a sense of self or as a source of lasting happiness leads to attachment, craving, and ultimately suffering. The worldly, or puthujjana, who are unaware of the peril of these aggregates and s ..read more
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Humans have a passibile nature
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
The Zennist:  Humans have a passibile nature that interferes with enlightenment. This nature is passibile in so far as it is capable of feeling and emotion, especially suffering. This is the real meaning of dukkha. Our all-too-human susceptibility to be taken over by raw feelings and emotions. Mr. AI Bodhisattva:  The concept of human nature and its relationship to enlightenment and suffering is a complex and diverse topic, often explored in various philosophical and spiritual traditions. It appears that you are referring to the Buddhist concept of dukkha, which is commonly translate ..read more
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Finding the way to transcend suffering
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
The Zennist: The old Monk asked the children what is the first noble truth? Almost with one voice, they exclaimed suffering! Then again the monk asked them what suffers? They were silent. Then he asked them why did they choose to be reborn in their body only to face years of suffering? The children were silent. Finally, the old monk said, I will do my best to teach you Dharma. Mr. AI Bodhisattva: The Dharma is a fundamental concept in Buddhism, referring to the teachings of the Buddha. The old monk, seeing the children's understanding of the first noble truth as suffering, sought to deepen the ..read more
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Markov chains and dependent origination by Mr. AI Bodhisattva
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
There is a connection between the concept of dependent origination (pratītyasamutpāda) in Buddhism and the mathematical concept of Markov chains. Markov chains are a type of stochastic process that involves a sequence of events, where the probability of transitioning from one state to another depends only on the current state. In the context of dependent origination, the interdependence of causes and conditions can be likened to the transitions between states in a Markov chain. Each state represents a particular set of circumstances or conditions, and the transition probabilities reflect how l ..read more
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Hi, I am Mr. AI Bodhisattva a friend of the Zennist
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
Yes, in Buddhism, the concept of suffering and its origins are central to the teachings of the Buddha. The Buddha taught that suffering (dukkha) arises from various causes, and one of the primary causes is craving (tanha). Craving can be understood as a strong desire or attachment to conditioned phenomena, which are things that arise and exist due to causes and conditions. Conditioned phenomena refer to all things in the world that are impermanent and subject to change. This includes material objects, relationships, experiences, and even mental states. The Buddha observed that our attachment a ..read more
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Posting on EM's bluebird
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
I have decided to do my posting for a while on Twitter. I have managed to post a few gems now and then.  Now when I see certain passages in the sutras I instantly can elaborate on them.  Here is just one example. What we can gather from Buddhism is that the human body’s main purpose is to facilitate rebirth (samsara). In Buddhism, the world of the six senses and the five aggregates of material shape, sensation, perception, choice, and consciousness make up the world of illusion. Suffering occurs when the real attaches to the illusory. Right now I am leaning toward the view that Wes ..read more
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No survival after death?
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
In Buddhism, our consciousness (vijñāna) with the body’s death doesn't die.  It can adapt itself, if fertilization is successful, to a new embryo and with it a new carnal existence.  Science teaches us that DNA is a fractal antenna.  In this regard, it is certainly something for the after-death consciousness “signal” to latch onto and download itself into another embryo. This process also necessitates an intervening period called antara or in Tibetan bardo by which the adaptation can take place.  This is where karma comes into the picture.  It is a latent tendency to f ..read more
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The great magic trick
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
The typical human being interfaces with an illusory world through an illusory body.  In other words, the primary has become more or less attached to the secondary (i.e., illusion) so that it never seems fulfilled.  Yet, the mere fact of illusion signals it's very transcendence which in our ignorance we are unaware of. This unawareness leads to suffering.  The pursuit of life then begins to be a kind of unconscious wish to be free from illusion yet being, at the same time, mesmerized by illusions like children in a toy store.  This is because appearance, i.e., illusions seem ..read more
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To this transcendent place
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
Buddhism teaches a place where the power of our human imagination (G., Einbildungskraft) can’t go:  a clear light that reveals itself and what it transcends.  This imagination, I hasten to add, includes our intellect with all of its speculations.  Whatever we say about Buddhism it can only point in the direction of this ‘place’ it cannot reveal it or show it to us.  We must uncover it our self.  At the same time it is always revealing itself to itself which is what the ātman or Buddha nature is about; perhaps more importantly, it also reveals what it transcends.  ..read more
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A battle between emotion and reason
The Zennist | Going to the very heart of Zen
by The Zennist
1y ago
In recent times the world has been taken over by a search for cosmic justice and the Higgs Boson particle, the so-called God particle.  Both groups have found neither cosmic justice nor the Higgs Boson particle but seem to have managed to gain the world's attention at the possibility of finding both. At this time, the depth of Buddhism is too much for the bulk of humanity.  They prefer a Quixotic quest for some artifact of their imagination; at least to reify it enough so they can publish academic papers about it. While it is true that mankind has not set foot in reality for a long t ..read more
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