Professor John Abraham Discusses Rising Ocean Heat Content
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
6d ago
Research published last month in Advances in Atmospheric Sciences by Prof. Abraham and his colleagues once again show ocean temperatures, more specifically ocean heat content (OHC), once again dramatically increased in 2023.  (As I noted last year, many believe OHC is the best way of measuring anthropocentric warming because it is comparatively less variable on a year-to-year basis.)  Oceans, that cover over 70% of the earth’s surface, absorb roughly 90% of the sun’s heat trapped by an increasing Earth Energy Imbalance (EEI) due to our continuing inability to meaningfully curb our gr ..read more
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Dr. Ajay Chaudhary Discusses "The Exhausted of the Earth, Politics in a Burning World"
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
2w ago
In his soon-to-be-published book, Dr. Chaudhary argues the climate crisis or the Anthropocene era is the political product of rightwing climate realism - what he terms the “Rex Tillerson Position.”  Listeners should be aware politics, not technology or economics, explains why the US continues to emit an enormous amount of CO2e pollution. (The US healthcare industry contributes approximately 550 MT CO2e annually or roughly 9% of the nation’s total.) The politics of functional climate denialism, or the belief business-as-usual can mitigate global warming, has resulted in economic, ecologica ..read more
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Dr. Robert Scoggins Discusses Medicare's Recent Regulatory Reform to Improve Sepsis Care
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
Sepsis presents an enormous public health threat. There are for approximately 1.7 million hospital cases and 270,000 deaths per year. Sepsis is consistently in the top five for hospital case volumes and is the most expensive and resource intensive medical inpatient condition, representing approximately 15% of total hospital costs despite accounting for less than 4% of hospital stays.  Various studies estimate sepsis is present in 30% to 50% of hospitalizations that culminate in death.  Because two-thirds of sepsis cases are paid for by Medicare, beginning this January 1, HHS will add ..read more
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UCLA Law Professor Joanna Schwartz Discusses Her Just-Published, "Shielded: How the Police Became Untouchable"
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
According to the non-profit Mapping Police Violence, since 2013 when experts first starting tracking police shootings, last year was the deadliest year on record with 1,176 law enforcement gun deaths, or more than three people per day and nearly 100 per month.  In 2022 Blacks were three three times more likely to be killed by police than Whites.  However in, for example, MPLS and Chicago, Black shooting deaths were respectively 28 and 25 times more likely than White.   In her recently published book by Viking Press, Prof. Schwartz explains how the corruption of the 4th amen ..read more
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Columbia University's Ms. Cynthia Hanawalt Discusses Public Reporting of Greenhouse Gas Emissions
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
US healthcare emits a massive amount of carbon pollution at approximately 600 million tons annually or roughly 9% of total US greenhouse gasses.  Because of the rapid increase in climate crisis-related harms projected economic losses worldwide over the next few years are estimated in the trillions.  Consequently, the US is beginning to follow Brazil, Canada, France, Japan, Switzerland and the UK in mandating GHG emission and climate-risk disclosures.  Most noteworthy, in April 2022 the Security Exchange Commissions (SEC) issued a proposed rule, anticipated to go final this month ..read more
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Dr. Robert Moffit Discusses "Modernizing Medicare: Harnessing the Power of Consumer Choice and Market Competition"
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
US healthcare spending is extreme currently at approximately $4.3 trillion.  The single largest payer of healthcare services is Medicare at roughly $900 billion annually or 21% of total healthcare spending.   In this edited volume, recently published by Johns Hopkins University Press, Dr. Moffit along with eleven other contributors including Joe Antos, Douglas Holtz-Eakin, Brian Miller, Mark Pauly and Gail Wilensky, lay out the conservative version of Medicare reform.  In sum, the authors argue federal policymakers reinvent Medicare as a defined contribution or premium supp ..read more
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Prof. Nancy Tomes Discusses Patients as Consumers and to What Extent Defining Medicine as a Commodity Has Proven Useful
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
Over the past several decades healthcare has increasingly defined patients as medical consumers.  For example, healthcare advertising is today a $22 billion annual business; federal policymakers have over the past few years instituted regulations requiring both hospitals and commercial health plans to make pricing information public; and, provider quality performance information is increasingly publicly reported.   The question begged is to what extent have efforts to define patients as medical care consumers been successful - or even legitimate.  In “Remaking the American Patie ..read more
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Professors Fredrik Albritton Jonsson and Carl Wennerlind Discuss They're Recently Published Book, "Scarcity: A History From the Origins of Capitalism to the Climate Crisis"
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
Professors Albritton Jonsson and Wennerlind’s recently published book, “Scarcity” by Harvard University Press, offers interpretations of a key concept in economic theory: scarcity, or the belief we live in a world of limited resources and therefore must master the natural world to meet desired needs.   The authors state, “the book does not offer a critique of the usefulness of the neoclassical concept of scarcity, instead, the problem we highlight is that it has been far too successful,” that is “by promoting optimal use of resources and maximum economic growth, it has fostered a wor ..read more
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Dr. Richard Young Discusses His Dystopian Healthcare Novel, "2060" (August 1st)
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
Dr. Young’s novel, “2060” tells the story of Willis Smith, a data analyst employed by IntegraHealth Pharmaceuticals. Mr. Smith is assigned to identify a surviving meta-quad, a patient that has survived four naturally occurring cancers.  In his search Willis meets the owners of Mekong Gardens Senior Care Center who offer a distinctly different healthcare formula.   The story arc peaks when the owners of Mekong Gardens’ care model is exposed and its owners are required to explain their alternative care model, or why they had been defrauding the Medicare program.  The novel is acco ..read more
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Sonia Roschnik Discusses the International Hospital Federation's Environmental Sustainability Programming
The Healthcare Policy Podcast
by David Introcaso, Ph.D.
1M ago
On background, listeners are aware that the US healthcare industry emits an enormous amount of GHG pollution, that hospitals are the largest contributor to industry emissions, that they are substantially energy in-efficient and that the industry’s emissions alone cause innumerable and unrelenting health harm - disproportionately impacting are Medicare seniors and Medicaid children.  Despite these facts the healthcare industry on balance remains solidly uncommitted to decarbonizing. Finally, listeners are now likely well aware early this week the earth reached unprecedented temperatures an ..read more
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