Key Developments in Humanitarian Disarmament: New Year, New Efforts
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitariandisarmament
2w ago
Jacqulyn Kantack, Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative Following a busy season of disarmament meetings at the end of 2023, the beginning of 2024 has been relatively quiet on the diplomatic front. Nevertheless, as ongoing armed conflicts, including in Gaza and Ukraine, inflict significant civilian casualties, proponents of humanitarian disarmament have sought to advance civilian protection through universalizing treaties, implementing instruments, and documenting harm. The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons has a new state party, and states met in Austria and Togo to disc ..read more
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Prioritising Protection of Civilians from Explosive Weapons: Bringing about Change through the Political Declaration
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
1M ago
Laura Boillot, Article 36 and International Network on Explosive Weapons (INEW) This blog originally appeared as part of the Forum on the Arms Trade website’s Looking Ahead 2024 series. Psychological support activities in UNRWA collective shelters in West Khan Younis, the Gaza Strip, in October 2023. Credit: Humanity & Inclusion, 2023. “The biggest challenge in this war is dealing with my children’s fear during the constant bombings. Evacuation is tough, moving from one place to another with my two children with disabilities, trying to appear strong despite my own fears. Sadly, nowhere is ..read more
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Key Developments in Humanitarian Disarmament: A Killer Robots Resolution and Measures to Address the Catastrophic Consequences of Nuclear Weapons  
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitariandisarmament
2M ago
Hina Uddin, Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative  The past two months were marked by a flurry of disarmament meetings. States wrapped up their annual session of the UN General Assembly’s First Committee on Disarmament and International Security in New York. Meetings of states parties also took place for the Convention on Conventional Weapons (CCW), Mine Ban Treaty, and the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW). While process dominated progress at the CCW gathering, elsewhere states took important steps on the road to a treaty on autonomous weapons systems and ad ..read more
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Nuclear Ban Treaty’s Inclusive Second Meeting Advances Nuclear Disarmament and Justice
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitariandisarmament
2M ago
Alicia Sanders-Zakre, International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons (ICAN) The Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW) continued to break new ground at its Second Meeting of States Parties (2MSP), held at the UN in New York from November 27-December 1, 2023. Nearly one hundred countries attended the meeting, where they agreed by consensus on a powerful declaration and package of decisions and reviewed the substantial progress to implement the treaty since the First Meeting of States Parties (1MSP) in June 2022. Hundreds of civil society representatives, reflecting a diversity o ..read more
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Remediating the Harms of Nuclear Weapons through an International Trust Fund
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
3M ago
Jacqulyn Kantack, Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic The release of Oppenheimer in July drew public attention to the history of nuclear weapons. However, the film has received significant criticism from nuclear weapons activists for glossing over the horrors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, as well as largely ignoring the history of nuclear weapons testing. Those activists are now preparing for the Second Meeting of States Parties to the 2017 Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons (TPNW), which will take place in New York from November 27-December 1, 2023. The treaty direct ..read more
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From War to Freedom in a Wheelchair: A Syrian Refugee’s Story of Survival
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
3M ago
Talish Babaian, Harvard Law School’s International Human Rights Clinic This blog was originally posted on the Harvard Law School International Human Rights Clinic website. A year ago this past week, on November 18, 2022, Syrian survivor and refugee Nujeen Mustafa spoke to delegates at the signing ceremony of the Political Declaration on Strengthening the Protection of Civilians from the Humanitarian Consequences arising from the Use of Explosive Weapons in Populated Areas. Signed by 83 countries, this groundbreaking declaration aims to better protect civilians from the bombing and shelling of ..read more
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New Humanitarian Disarmament Resource Launched: Harvard ACCPI Brochure
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
4M ago
An updated brochure on humanitarian disarmament, recently published by Harvard Law School’s Armed Conflict and Civilian Protection Initiative (ACCPI), offers an overview of this people-centered approach to governing weapons. The brochure aims to provide a better understanding of the cross-cutting concept of humanitarian disarmament as well as an introduction to the key issues it covers. Credit: Cathy Tutaev for ACCPI, 2023. Humanitarian disarmament seeks to prevent and remediate arms-inflicted human suffering and environmental harm through the establishment and implementation of norms. The bro ..read more
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Civil Society Statement on Humanitarian Disarmament at the UN General Assembly’s First Committee
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
4M ago
At a session of the UN General Assembly’s First Committee on Disarmament and International Security, on October 11, 2023, nongovernmental organizations presented statements on a range of topics, including the arms trade, autonomous weapons, cluster munitions, incendiary weapons, landmines, nuclear weapons, the use of explosive weapons in populated areas, and the protection of the environment in armed conflict.  Matthew Bolton of the International Disarmament Institute at Pace University delivered the following joint civil society statement on humanitarian disarmament. The s ..read more
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Consigning Cluster Munitions to the Past
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
5M ago
Susan Aboeid, Human Rights Watch While much has been accomplished over the years to stigmatize and minimize the use of cluster munitions, more work is needed to ensure the weapons are not used in current or future conflicts. In September, more than 75 states gathered at the UN in Geneva for the 11th Meeting of States Parties to the Convention on Cluster Munitions to take stock of their progress and determine next steps. The 2008 convention prohibits the use, production, transfer, and stockpiling of cluster munitions. It obligates states parties to destroy stocks, clear contaminated areas, assi ..read more
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159 Recommendations to the UN General Assembly First Committee
HUMANITARIAN DISARMAMENT
by humanitarian_disarmament
5M ago
Emma Bjertén and Ray Acheson, Reaching Critical Will The UN General Assembly First Committee on Disarmament and International Security was created from the ashes of World War II, with the goal to prevent such a tragedy from occurring again. Seventy-eight years later, member states are preparing to convene once again during multiple devastating wars and increased geopolitical tensions.  Last year’s First Committee took place less than a year after Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine, which unsurprisingly exacerbated preexisting tensions and strains within the committee. The voting patt ..read more
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