Can Robots Reinvent Fast Food?
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
6d ago
Restaurants are a tough business with tight margins, from the cost of food to paying for staff. Kernel, the new venture by Steve Ells, the founder and former CEO of Chipotle Mexican Grill, is trying to fix that by introducing food-making robots and a "digital-first" approach to restaurants. In this conversation from the WSJ Global Food Forum in June, reporter Heather Haddon talks with Ells about his new bet on consumers’ desire to eat less meat, and on a business model that could solve some of the industry’s thorny challenges. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or ..read more
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Why You Might Be Eating More Seaweed in the Future
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
1w ago
To hear proponents talk about it, seaweed could solve a whole lot of problems. It could feed people, restore polluted habitats and be an economic boost for fishermen. Though seaweed aquaculture has grown in the U.S. in recent years, the country produced less than 1% of the global seaweed crop in 2019. Now, some companies are trying to get seaweed aquaculture to scale in the U.S. But there are regulatory hurdles to overcome, and researchers have questions about how a scaled industry would affect existing ecosystems. WSJ’s Alex Ossola looks at what it will take to make seaweed a bigger part of t ..read more
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How Designer Fruit Is Taking Over the Grocery Store
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
2w ago
No more mealy apples and flavorless oranges. There’s a growing category of produce available in your local grocery store: fruits and vegetables that have been carefully bred with flavor in mind. But these more delicious varieties tend to come in premium packaging—with a premium price to boot. WSJ contributor Elizabeth G. Dunn tells host Alex Ossola how this produce is bred and whether we can expect to see more of it in the future.  What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com  Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of E ..read more
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Science of Success: The Hot Window AC Making Summers Cool
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
3w ago
They’re ugly. They’re clunky. They’re loud. And, worst of all, they spike your energy bills every summer. The window air conditioner is a dreaded summer staple in many homes. But one company is redefining how an AC functions by thinking outside the typical window box. For Science of Success, WSJ’s Ben Cohen tells the story of Midea’s U-shaped window AC that captured the collective consciousness for its noise reduction and energy efficiency. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com  Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future o ..read more
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How NASA Sees Climate Change From Space
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
1M ago
Our climate is changing. In the last 100 years, the planet has warmed about 1.5 degrees Celsius, according to NASA. But how can we learn more about our planet’s climate and what we can do to slow the changes? Gavin A. Schmidt, a top NASA climate scientist and director of NASA’s Goddard Institute for Space Studies, spoke with WSJ reporter Emily Glazer at the Future of Everything Festival on May 22, 2024 about the future of climate science and the data NASA is collecting on the Earth by looking at it from space. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or emai ..read more
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Keeping Cities Cool in a Warmer Future
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
1M ago
2023 was the world’s hottest year on record, and temperatures are expected to continue heating up. Cities, where more than half of the world lives, are contending with this extreme heat. But some places, such as Singapore, are looking for ways to modify aspects of their cities to make them more comfortable for people to live. The Cooling Singapore project is creating a hyper detailed digital twin of the city-state to be able to test the effectiveness of new methods the city would want to implement. WSJ’s Alex Ossola explains what they’ve learned, and how it can help us understand how more citi ..read more
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Saving Ketchup: The Race to Breed a Tomato for a Warming World
WSJ's The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
1M ago
What good is a future without ketchup or pasta sauce? These are just two potential casualties of a changing climate, as tomato growers face shrinking harvests due to hotter and drier weather. WSJ reporter Patrick Thomas takes us behind the scenes of how seed breeders are trying to make a tomato that can thrive with less water, and how that highlights the efforts going into protecting crops against the effects of climate change. Sign up for the WSJ's free The Future of Everything newsletter. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@ws ..read more
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Science of Success: Birkenstocks and the Promise of Healthy Feet
WSJ’s The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
2M ago
 How did a sandal that originally entered the U.S. market as a health product become a fashion staple and the crowning shoe of a multibillion dollar company? Margot Fraser originally brought Birkenstocks to the U.S. thinking that the comfort of the German sandal would appeal to women. But she couldn’t get shoe stores to sell them. They finally made it into the U.S. market through health food stores. Now, the seductively ugly shoe is a cultural icon and was valued at about $8.6 billion when the company went public last year. WSJ’s Ben Cohen explores the history of Birkenstock and how it pa ..read more
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Will a Treatment Work? Try the 'Digital Twin' First.
WSJ’s The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
2M ago
How does your doctor know that a drug or procedure will work to treat a condition before they try it? Often, they don’t. Researchers are looking to create “digital twins,” digital versions of individual organs, to see how a patient will respond. Eventually there could be digital twins of entire bodies that are updated in real time with patient data. WSJ’s Alex Ossola speaks with WSJ senior special writer Stephanie Armour about how that might change the way we treat diseases in the future.  What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify , or email us: FOEPodcas ..read more
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Ultrasound Isn’t Just for Pregnancy. How It’s Helping Treat the Brain.
WSJ’s The Future of Everything
by The Wall Street Journal
2M ago
Ultrasound is known for its use in imaging during pregnancy. But new advancements in the technology suggest that in the future, ultrasound could be used to disrupt the blood-brain barrier. This would allow doctors to more easily diagnose and directly treat illnesses like brain cancer without major surgery. WSJ’s Danny Lewis and Charlotte Gartenberg examine the new ways that ultrasound could be used more specifically and subtly to deliver accurate diagnoses and precise treatments. What do you think about the show? Let us know on Apple Podcasts or Spotify, or email us: FOEPodcast@wsj.com Sign ..read more
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